Dri-Core vs. ThermalDry sub-flooring - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 41 Old 03-07-2007, 06:08 PM - Thread Starter
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My dedicated room has a Dri-Core sub-flooring with carpeting over it. Heavy rains from last week and an unusual build up of ice from a previous storm caused flooding down the bulkhead stairs. About an inch of water reached the theater flooring causing the carpeting to get wet. If you stepped on the carpet, you could invoke the casual water rule (golfers will know what I'm talking about ).

Serv-Pro is now drying out the theater. They have a problem with the Dri-Core tiles. They took one out and water just dripped out of the tile. It seems the water becomes trapped in the cups that make up the plastic bottom. According to them they will have to rip up the entire flooring because they can't get the water out of the tile.

Please look at this link for ThermalDry floor matting. Those Dri-Core tiles are what mine look like. Not good.

http://www.basementsystems.com/basem...asement_floor/

So I'm thinking of replacing it with the ThermalDry product. Has anyone had any experience with ThermalDry? Any opinions?

Thanks,
Skip
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post #2 of 41 Old 03-07-2007, 08:23 PM
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Sorry, I don't have any experience with ThermalDry but it is very interesting product that I haven't seen before. Thanks for pointing it out. Looks like it may be expensive, though......do you have any pricing?
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post #3 of 41 Old 03-08-2007, 03:15 AM - Thread Starter
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No pricing. It may be a proprietary product sold through Basement Systems franchisees.

Anyone work for or know anyone who works for one of these franchises?

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post #4 of 41 Old 03-08-2007, 04:55 AM
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Did see these at the home show last weekend. Not sure you can buy them DIY. I mentioned Dricore and they said roughly the same thing that the website said about them.
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post #5 of 41 Old 03-08-2007, 06:33 AM
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Looks like Dricore has an inherent design flaw. I would think if Dricore could figure out how to put some perforations in the dimples that it might solve some of the water retention problem.

Dricore 2.0?


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post #6 of 41 Old 03-08-2007, 06:47 AM
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That product does look interesting. I would have had a choice to make if i would have known about this a couple of months ago but I didn't and put down Dricore. In Dricore's defense they make the same claims as are made by ThermalDry. If you get 1 inch of water in your basement with the ThermalDry your carpet will still be ruined but I guess you would not have to replace the subfloor. One more point my Dricore tiles do not have cups on the bottom it is more of a starfish design (shrugs) really don't know how to describe it and i do not have any pics of the underside of my tiles maybe i can take one when i get home this evening and post it. Sorry about your water damage also.

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post #7 of 41 Old 03-08-2007, 12:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 704set View Post

My dedicated room has a Dri-Core sub-flooring with carpeting over it. Heavy rains from last week and an unusual build up of ice from a previous storm caused flooding down the bulkhead stairs. About an inch of water reached the theater flooring causing the carpeting to get wet. If you stepped on the carpet, you could invoke the casual water rule (golfers will know what I'm talking about ).

Serv-Pro is now drying out the theater. They have a problem with the Dri-Core tiles. They took when out and water just dripped out of the tile. It seems the water becomes trapped in the cups that make up the plastic bottom. According to them they will have to rip up the entire flooring because they can't get the water out of the tile.

Please look at this link for ThermalDry floor matting. Those Dri-Core tiles are what mine look like. Not good.

http://www.basementsystems.com/basem...asement_floor/

So I'm thinking of replacing it with the ThermalDry product. Has anyone had any experience with ThermalDry? Any opinions?

Thanks,
Skip

Ok, this is getting a bit ridiculous. They a proposing a system for basements that are prone to flooding?! The Dri-core system is a "warm floor" type of system that gets your feet off the concrete and allows the concrete to breathe. Concrete is inherently porous and will always wick water to some degree. The plastic spacers provided by Dri-core or Platon or Delta-FL are there to provide migration of moisture to keep the concrete "dry".

If you have water problems that require you to install plastic everywhere, what about the carpeting? Astroturf? What about the walls? Prefabricated plastic wall systems a la Altro Whiterock? Or line the bottom four feet of all your basement walls with Durock.

This appears to be a sales tactic of creating a need for a product that shouldn't exist. Chances are that if you have flooding to the extent that ruins your flooring, you may end up having a lot more damage. How do you know that you will only ever have 1/2" to 1" of water damage at any time? Wouldn't they have to rip out the bottom portion of the basement to properly dry it? Wouldn't the carpet need replacing if it gets soaked? Seems it would need an insurance claim for the amount of work that would be involved. I think this is just another product to make money and its benefits probably do not justify its cost.

One of the reasons for using heavy sheets of plywood or OSB is to provide a relatively even surface. If you have a perfectly flat basement floor with little to no cracking and no heaving (newer basements - likely have no headroom issues), then this product will work fine. Any heaving and you have to pour a lot of self-leveling product to get the floor to a point where it is usable.

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post #8 of 41 Old 03-08-2007, 01:00 PM
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I had 4" of water in my basement last June . Pulled up all the carpet and Dricore.
Let the dricore sit out in the sun and in my shed . I did intend to throw it away. My neighbor who happens to be a contractor told me I should have no problem
laying the dricore back down. You just have to pull off the cups to check to see they are not holding water . Mine dried very well - no water in the cups. I since have fixed the water problem - 7 g's later I have re-installed the dricore.It fit back together without any problems.
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post #9 of 41 Old 03-08-2007, 02:42 PM
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Have you contacted Dricore to see what they say?

Seems that the water 'in the cups' should evaporate like any other case.
Perhaps turn the dricore tiles upside down?

Ever seen a home under construction. Often it rains before the roof is on, and again before the tar paper is on the roof.
I've never seen them rip out the wood after a rain. They just let it dry out.

Paul
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post #10 of 41 Old 03-19-2007, 05:49 PM
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I think you have to decide what is right for you. I considered Dri Core and opted for a Delta FL install with Advantech and engineered wood floors in my walk-out basement. It works fine for me. I agree that water + wood is bad. So just keep the water away from it!!!! That is the whole point of products like Dri Core, System Platon, and Delta FL. Leaking water pipes, frozen heating pipes, and leaking appliances will cause water damage on any level of your house no matter what type of flooring system you have. That is why people purchase home owners insurance. Even with those plastic tiles, in the event of a major water leak you are going to have to rip everything up. Great, you can save the plastic tiles, but the flooring on top and the labor dollars to replace will still be lost.
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post #11 of 41 Old 03-22-2007, 06:55 PM
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dricore has a star design now...no more cups...i put down pressure treated wood and siliconed the crap out of it to make a dam to prevent any small floods from the bathroom and laundry room
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post #12 of 41 Old 03-26-2007, 07:03 PM
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That's a good idea. In my house, my furnace, hot water heater, and washer & dryer are all in a small utility room separated from the house w/ a fire-proof door. Obviously I am not running my Delta FL and engineered wood into this room. My plan is to install an oak threshold at this door. I am thinking I will seal it in with caulking as you did. If I end up with a leaking washer or something, it will be contained to this room and worst case I will have to replace the threshold. I suppose I could add a sump pump w/ a water level monitor for added protection.

Regardless, for anyone considering one of these subfloor systems, I say do it - hands down. The advantages are considerable. My floors (over concrete) are so warm and compliant now that they are virtually indistinguishable from the upper level of my house. The cold, damp, musty concrete feel is completely gone.
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post #13 of 41 Old 03-26-2007, 08:44 PM
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Where were you able to find the Delta. Searched the site and did not come up with where to buy. How does it compare to Dricore. Here in south central Indiana Dricore is roughly $6.00 for the 2X2 square and sometimes you can find it on sale for around $5.00 bucks if you are patient.

Thanks

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Now a Certified Carpet Counselor and Plumbing Counselor (Self given titles - pay no attention).
Enjoying my "almost done" theater.
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post #14 of 41 Old 03-27-2007, 03:33 AM - Thread Starter
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According to the salesman for the ThermalDry flooring, DriCore is an organic material. Not good if it gets damp because it can breed mold.

Skip
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post #15 of 41 Old 03-27-2007, 06:16 AM
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Quote:


According to the salesman for the ThermalDry flooring, DriCore is an organic material. Not good if it gets damp because it can breed mold.

Here we go with the mold scare. Sounds like the pitch from OC basement systems people.
The dricore has plastic on the bottom and has some sort of finish on top. While I was doing my plumbing and one of the joints failed under pressure, I was able to simply mop up the water from the driciore. The water actually beaded up. No matter what you put on the floor, if you get enough water damage to ruin it, you've got WAY bigger problems than what was put on the floor. So, it got damp. It didn't grow mold and ruin my house, make my wife leave me and get me fired and put me out on the streets.

And, I have to be thinking the drciore actually made me MORE aware of the water situation around my house. I have not a had ANY water problems whatsoever in my basement. However, because I was thinking about the dricroe I had just put down, after a particularly heavy rain, I thouhgt "I better go check." Sure enough, the drain in the walkout area right outside the basement was blocked and the water was lapping at the bottom of the newly installed sliding door. I managed to grab a shovel, get the door open and clear the drain from the doorway, so problem averted. Now I go and check around the area once in while. I think if I had put down something that I can just forget about, I wouldn't have checked and WOULD have had a flood.

I think this argument is down to "He said, she said." It's a personal choice. I love my dricore, as like others have said, it just feels like the rest of the house.

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post #16 of 41 Old 03-27-2007, 11:48 AM - Thread Starter
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No "he said, she said" here. This is from experience.

My basement flooded with about 1 inch of water. Enough to get into the DriCore and dampen the carpet. The problem is getting the water out from between the plastic bottom and sealed top. It's impossible. The DriCore had to come up and even then the tiles were saturated to a point that they could not be completely dried.

DriCore is a great product if you are certain your basement will not flood. But that is never a guarantee. In fact, it's usually not a case of "if" the basement floods, but "when". So be prepared to either rip up the flooring or live with the moisture in the tile if it floods. As far as mold scare, every individual has to determine that risk.

As for me, I will not put down DriCore again.

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post #17 of 41 Old 03-29-2007, 06:50 AM
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Put some rubber floors in and you can bounce around bud lights.

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post #18 of 41 Old 03-29-2007, 01:16 PM
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When I first started to read the OP I was thinking, I don't remember writing this.
It is exactly my story down to the serv-pro drying the carpet. Same deal with the ice build up in the backyard causing the waterfall down the back stairs.

I actually have the thermal-dry tiles and had no issue with getting dried out. Serv-pro took out the carpet pad, ran blowers and dehumidifiers for 4 days. Had the pad replaced, serv-pro cleaned the carpet, and I'm back in business. Biggest problem was a small bathroom area with laminated floor that had to be replaced, but that was a 1day diy job for me.

Now I am working on creating a solution to the poor drainage in the back yard so it won't happen again.
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post #19 of 41 Old 03-30-2007, 05:56 AM - Thread Starter
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There you go. Very similar issues. The only difference is the DriCore ended up in the trash.

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post #20 of 41 Old 03-30-2007, 07:36 AM
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How expensive is ThermalDry? Can you buy it for DIY or do you have to use their installers?
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post #21 of 41 Old 03-30-2007, 07:47 AM
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If its the same stuff I saw at the home show few weeks back, looked good, but DIY'ers could not buy it. Had to be installed by "registered" installers. The product looked ok, but from what I remember was thinner then dricore and was 100% plastic. Not sure if it would have the same insulating values as the dricore product does.
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post #22 of 41 Old 03-30-2007, 04:36 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Solodon View Post

If its the same stuff I saw at the home show few weeks back, looked good, but DIY'ers could not buy it. Had to be installed by "registered" installers. The product looked ok, but from what I remember was thinner then dricore and was 100% plastic. Not sure if it would have the same insulating values as the dricore product does.


The 100% plastic is the advantage if flooded. I don't know about the insulation factor, but padding should be placed under the carpeting. That would definitely help.

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post #23 of 41 Old 06-05-2007, 07:19 AM
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Any product installed in a basement containing organic material, no matter what brand, poses a threat of inhibiting mold and has the potential to expand and warp if there is humidity or basement leaks. It may not happen immediately, but over time it will. The Thermal Dry Floor Matting material is made of all plastic, eliminating mold, rot and warping.

When installing a subfloor material, it is assumed that you have waterproofed your basement (even if you "only have a leak during really heavy rains") and have a quality dehumidification system. A subflooring material is NOT a way to control water, it is intended on lifting carpet off of the cold concrete floor, creating a vapor barrier and a more comfortable surface. Someone had mentioned that a subflooring material is unnecessary, and is created as a scare tactic. But a quality subflooring material can make a big difference in your finished basement as compared to installing carpet on a concrete floor (that's just asking for mold growth -remember concrete is porus).

The bottom line in the debate of the subflooring material is that you'll want to purchase something that will withstand all conditions and last over time. Plastic is a way to ensure that you'll only have to purchase a subfloor once. Waterproofing...now thats another issue.
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post #24 of 41 Old 05-22-2008, 07:24 PM
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I have my basement to remodel too and I agree that a flood is a matter of when...
What do you think about replacing the plywood over a Delta Fl membrane by a Durock (cement board)?
Regards.
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post #25 of 41 Old 05-25-2008, 12:26 PM
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The issue with the DriCore was a design flaw that has since been corrected.

Jason


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post #26 of 41 Old 01-25-2009, 07:08 PM
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I have had several really bad experiences with the ThermalDry flooring system.

I am speaking as an installer - one of the franchisees...
We had one customer have a flood in their 40m2 basement after we laid the tile and before they paid the bill, they still haven't paid and said they had to rip up the whole of the floor tile system as water got trapped under it and started to smell. The edges do not seal in an airtight way and that is part of the problem. A few other jobs we did the tiles just will not stay flat. The supplier (basementsystemsinc) has changed the design several times even introducing a flexible version but still the tiles pop up. It can look pretty when newly laid but I wouldn't recommend them for normal use, walk over them a few times or drag things accross them and you will have problems.

We are looking at a new tile system from grate products which looks like they will solve all of these problems and will be using these in future Meanwhile, what do I do with all my useless stock of the Basement systems product? Any ideas?
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post #27 of 41 Old 01-25-2009, 07:46 PM
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Anybody try this: http://www.superseal.ca/all_in_one_subfloor.html

It seems similar to Delta-fl but with better load capability and no need for a plywood topper. They also make a tile specific version. A little while back, I got a quote for about 50 cents/sq ft. Pretty good price.
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post #28 of 41 Old 01-25-2009, 08:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coctostan View Post

Anybody try this: http://www.superseal.ca/all_in_one_subfloor.html

It seems similar to Delta-fl but with better load capability and no need for a plywood topper. They also make a tile specific version. A little while back, I got a quote for about 50 cents/sq ft. Pretty good price.

So was that 50 cent sq/ft for the tile specific version?

Any other experience with this one? I like the fact that I don't have to do plywood over top.
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post #29 of 41 Old 01-26-2009, 06:22 AM
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It was about $0.50/sq ft for the roll type "All-in-one". It is the type that goes under carpet or laminate/engineered hardwood without needing plywood on top. I got that quote about a year ago so don't assume it is still valid.

Delta-Fl:
Load - 5,200 psf
Thickness - 5/16" + 3/4" ply

Superseal AIO:
Load - 7800 psf
Thickness - 1/8"

The prices are about the same until you factor in the cost of the ply for Delta-Fl.
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post #30 of 41 Old 08-15-2009, 07:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thejazzman59 View Post

I have had several really bad experiences with the ThermalDry flooring system.

I am speaking as an installer - one of the franchisees...
We had one customer have a flood in their 40m2 basement after we laid the tile and before they paid the bill, they still haven't paid and said they had to rip up the whole of the floor tile system as water got trapped under it and started to smell. The edges do not seal in an airtight way and that is part of the problem. A few other jobs we did the tiles just will not stay flat. The supplier (basementsystemsinc) has changed the design several times even introducing a flexible version but still the tiles pop up. It can look pretty when newly laid but I wouldn't recommend them for normal use, walk over them a few times or drag things accross them and you will have problems.

We are looking at a new tile system from grate products which looks like they will solve all of these problems and will be using these in future Meanwhile, what do I do with all my useless stock of the Basement systems product? Any ideas?

Was this with the carpeted tiles or the plastic tiles? I was thinking of having my basement done with the carpeting tiles but your post is making me rethink about it. How about the plastic tiles and then lay a wall-to-wall carpet on top of them? Wouldn't that solve the problem of the tiles popping up and being a hinder?

What price per sqft should we be able to negotiate for the carpet tiles or for the plastic tiles?

Other non-wooden solutions you would recommend?

Thx.
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