What I'd do differently next time. - Page 13 - AVS Forum
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post #361 of 816 Old 02-16-2009, 12:59 PM
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Originally Posted by dgjks6 View Post

1 - To all of those tape measure losers: I used to be one too. This is what I did. I got a work belt - and forced myself to always use it.

This is such a simple suggestion but it probably would've saved me hours. I can't count the number of times I ran around looking for the tool I set down minutes ago.
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post #362 of 816 Old 02-20-2009, 11:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Tariq745 View Post

my house was build in 2003 and I could get my basement 1 foot deeper for $1000 it is 9feet now. I think I should have spend that $1000 but I was laid off that time Dam economy!

Don't regret NOT doing this. for $1000 is most certainly would have been done WRONG.
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post #363 of 816 Old 02-21-2009, 10:58 AM
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I wish i had planned better, not let my friends influence that plan, and not trust my best friend to build the bar.
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post #364 of 816 Old 02-22-2009, 03:37 AM
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Originally Posted by lowrancep View Post

I would spend more time picking dead-straight wood for framing.

In my case the real problem is procrastinating on getting it nailed/screwed into place. With the framing lumber from big-name stores, what is dead straight off the rack can become a twisted nightmare after only 2-3 days of lying around in the house.
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post #365 of 816 Old 02-22-2009, 07:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Mr_Mike_P View Post

Don't regret NOT doing this. for $1000 is most certainly would have been done WRONG.

I don't think he was saying they would dig his existing 9-foot basement one foot deeper, but that he was building a new house, and for $1000 they would build a 10-foot instead of 9-foot basement.

I agree, I passed on that option, and should have taken it.

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post #366 of 816 Old 02-22-2009, 09:21 AM
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Originally Posted by AbMagFab View Post

I don't think he was saying they would dig his existing 9-foot basement one foot deeper, but that he was building a new house, and for $1000 they would build a 10-foot instead of 9-foot basement.

I agree, I passed on that option, and should have taken it.

Yes, much cheaper in the construction phase. I opted for 9' ceilings (10' is too cavernous for me) and 17' vaulted ceiling in the great room and home theater. Money well spent! I never have regretted it.
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post #367 of 816 Old 02-25-2009, 11:05 AM
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Got another one. After I hang the drywall, I use a dremel type thing (made by black and decker) to cut out the outlet boxes. When I finished the other side of the basement worked like a charm. In the theater had problems doing it. Then I remembered that in the basement I had all metal boxes, and here I used the $.25 home depot box. The drill went right through the plastic.

Therefore, I learned that next time I will buy better boxes.
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post #368 of 816 Old 02-25-2009, 11:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dgjks6 View Post

Got another one. After I hang the drywall, I use a dremel type thing (made by black and decker) to cut out the outlet boxes. When I finished the other side of the basement worked like a charm. In the theater had problems doing it. Then I remembered that in the basement I had all metal boxes, and here I used the $.25 home depot box. The drill went right through the plastic.

Therefore, I learned that next time I will buy better boxes.

Or use the right dremel bit? I think there's one that cuts the drywall but won't cut the plastic boxes. Most people (at least in this area) use only plastic boxes, and the drywall guys never cut a box.

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post #369 of 816 Old 02-25-2009, 06:09 PM
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There are 2 "grades". The cheap ones I bought suck. The regular ones that I used for the sconces I had no problem. I bought the dremel drywall bit with the gauge - so I assume it is the right bit. Oh well, nothing a little joint compound can not fix.
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post #370 of 816 Old 02-26-2009, 01:13 PM
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They just finished hanging drywall in my basement where I have both plastic and metal boxes. They used a dewalt tool with a drill bit that looks just like a dremel on steriods. Cutouts look perfect.
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post #371 of 816 Old 02-26-2009, 02:18 PM
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I own said "dremel on steroids" and unfortunately can attest to the fact that your perfect cutouts probably have a lot more to do with the skilled hands steering the tool than the tool itself.


I should have sealed my foundation walls before I framed. (no water problems yet, just the added peace of mind.)

I bought 8' pt lumber because it was easier to transport. If I had bought longer lumber for floor plates, my walls would have been straighter, easier,... and required fewer studs.

I would have put down more sak-crete under my shower base. If you step in this one small spot, it creaks slightly.

I would have covered up my wife's treadmill better before drywall sanding.

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post #372 of 816 Old 03-11-2009, 06:17 PM
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Buy a corner trowel if you are going to do your own drywall. Do it. It is only $13, but I was too cheap and spent hours in the corners.
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post #373 of 816 Old 03-20-2009, 09:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mbec View Post

I own said "dremel on steroids" and unfortunately can attest to the fact that your perfect cutouts probably have a lot more to do with the skilled hands steering the tool than the tool itself.

I should have sealed my foundation walls before I framed. (no water problems yet, just the added peace of mind.)

I bought 8' pt lumber because it was easier to transport. If I had bought longer lumber for floor plates, my walls would have been straighter, easier,... and required fewer studs.

I would have put down more sak-crete under my shower base. If you step in this one small spot, it creaks slightly.

I would have covered up my wife's treadmill better before drywall sanding.

I can attest to the Dri-lok waterproof paint stopping water where it was coming through before (have to wait until it warms up more before I can fix the root cause and run exterior drain tile).

I'm not sure what you mean by longer top/bottom plates meaning you'll have less studs. The stud pattern shouldn't change based on your plates.. You can attach the same stud across two plates.
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post #374 of 816 Old 03-20-2009, 03:04 PM
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If you build long walls in 8' sections as I did, the sections must be joined somehow. Rather than using double top and bottom plates as the point of attachment, I chose to nail the end studs of each respective wall section to one another (effectively joining the two wall sections.)


The studs are on 16" centers with the sole exception of the last stud (which needs to be there as a point of attachment for the beginning of the next 8' wall section. 16 centers are preserved for the entire length of the wall, but every 8' of straight wall requires one additional stud as point of attachment only and not for drywall.

If I had bought pressure treated lumber as long as I wanted the wall to be (instead of only 8' long), I could have used 1 less stud par 8 lineal ft of wall.


I hope I explained myself clearly, it's one of those ideas that is simple to convey in person or with a picture, yet oddly complicated to describe with words.


EDIT: I reread your post. Rather than pulling 16 and backing off 3/4 (like an actual carpenter would) I pulled 16s from the end and ran with it. I didn't realize the error until I was finished. It certainly didn't cause any problems, but I would have backed of that 3/4 had I thought of it.

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post #375 of 816 Old 03-20-2009, 03:17 PM
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Not using double top plates loses all of the horizontal rigidity (I can't say I've ever seen it done - single plates - other than homeowners). I'm not even sure that it's code, without using metal connector plates to tie them together and having joists and/or walls above it in line.

I know exactly what you're saying (you explained it well), but the attachment of two distinct walls should use double top plates unless other rules are followed. A side effect of this typical construction is that you don't need a second stud at each wall section. It seems like a lot of extra work for less structural integrity and basically the same amount of wood.
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post #376 of 816 Old 03-25-2009, 02:01 PM
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I am not a carpenter by trade (obviously).

Structural integrity is a non issue in my basement because every other stud is screwed to a block which I shot to the foundation wall after applying liquid nails.

Thanks for the input, unfortunately for me, it's 2 years too late to be of any help.

Hopefully it will save someone else a few headaches.

rob

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post #377 of 816 Old 03-25-2009, 02:22 PM
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No worries - that's what this thread is all about, right?
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post #378 of 816 Old 03-27-2009, 03:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dthibode View Post

This is such a simple suggestion but it probably would've saved me hours. I can't count the number of times I ran around looking for the tool I set down minutes ago.

I actually have a solution for this one, at least for me. I have now probably 6 or so tape measure. If I forget one, I just go get another one. Eventually by the time the job is done, I will slower recover them all during cleanup. I do the same for other essential tools.

Before that, I just run around in circles hours after afters looking for it.
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post #379 of 816 Old 03-27-2009, 03:52 PM
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A tool belt is also an amazing concept. Cheaper and more organized than $12-15 x 6 (I don't buy the cheapo ones since the $12 ones last forever).
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post #380 of 816 Old 04-15-2009, 09:35 AM
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Only read through a few pages of this thread but I haven't seen anyone say this yet - Make a shopping list BEFORE going to Home Depot or Lowes. I'm sure I wasted numerous hours, days, weeks (+gas) because I forgot to get something at the store and had to go back or go the next day. Once I started making lists, I zipped through the construction phase.

And as Murphy would have it, a big brand new HD was built right around the corner from my neighborhood 6 months after my theater was done.

Visit the Lipszyc Home Theater! 1.0
2.0 done and finally posted! - Theater 2.0

And now...The Queen City Theater (3.0)
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post #381 of 816 Old 04-15-2009, 12:38 PM
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Originally Posted by blipszyc View Post

Only read through a few pages of this thread but I haven't seen anyone say this yet - Make a shopping list BEFORE going to Home Depot or Lowes. I'm sure I wasted numerous hours, days, weeks (+gas) because I forgot to get something at the store and had to go back or go the next day. Once I started making lists, I zipped through the construction phase.

And as Murphy would have it, a big brand new HD was built right around the corner from my neighborhood 6 months after my theater was done.

Ha, I fell into that so many times (and still do at times). Thank goodness that Lowes built a store a couple blocks away (not so bad having to run back, but very inconvenient and loss of time). Yes, I also learned to make a list.

This is a great learning thread!!! Thanks!
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post #382 of 816 Old 04-30-2009, 01:47 PM
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Originally Posted by jstolzen View Post

Unless you have HUNDREDS (and I mean HUNDREDS!) of "free hours" to spend reading, researching, analyzing, and all around tearing your hair out, I'd HIGHLY recommend hiring one of the experienced HT design people here on AVS FROM THE GET GO. .

I'm going to be building my HT myself but I might consider hiring an HT design person to help me with the layout since I have several ways I can go. Who do I contact here at AVS for that? Thanks.
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post #383 of 816 Old 04-30-2009, 01:55 PM
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Originally Posted by robd1 View Post

I'm going to be building my HT myself but I might consider hiring an HT design person to help me with the layout since I have several ways I can go. Who do I contact here at AVS for that? Thanks.

On the flip side, I would say one thing I would change would be to analyze a lot of the stuff posted here a bit better. there are a lot of forces here promoting things that benefit the person (company) posting. I found general contracting my basement theater much easier then imaginable. I think you can skip most of the "technologies" people post around here and still have a space thats 99% as good without them and save a whole heck of a lot of money. I sure am happy 2 years later.

"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic" -Arthur C. Clarke
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post #384 of 816 Old 04-30-2009, 03:52 PM
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I hear ya tleavit, I'm not so keen on some of the new technologies myself. Maybe I should just make a new thread with pics and ask for general advice. The framing, sheetrock, finishing and painting I can do but I'll probably just contract out whatever flooring I decide on and the major electrical work.
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post #385 of 816 Old 04-30-2009, 04:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robd1 View Post

I'm going to be building my HT myself but I might consider hiring an HT design person to help me with the layout since I have several ways I can go. Who do I contact here at AVS for that? Thanks.

If it's a hobby, take your time and work through getting the best physical layout with regard to viewing angle, sight lines, projector position (especially important if using an HP screen), speaker placement, room dimensions. These are things that are difficult to change later on. I spent a good couple of months plotting this all out, setting it aside and coming back to it until I was sure all was as I wanted it. I am very pleased with the results. But again, it is a hobby for me.

If it's something you just want in a hurry, hire a professional with references.
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post #386 of 816 Old 04-30-2009, 05:40 PM
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The murphy corollary: Never buy anything for your HT that you can't afford to replace.

If you buy a top-dollar screen, you will splash coffee on it.

If you buy a white leather $10k one-piece couch, you will forget to take the screwdriver out of your back pocket.

If you cash in the 401k to buy the biggest projector, mount, and 2.35 setup, and a no-exclusions extended warranty on the entire thing... you will find the termite-infested joist, still attached to the remains of your projector on the floor.
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post #387 of 816 Old 04-30-2009, 06:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Fn0rd View Post

The murphy corollary: Never buy anything for your HT that you can't afford to replace.

If you buy a top-dollar screen, you will splash coffee on it.

If you buy a white leather $10k one-piece couch, you will forget to take the screwdriver out of your back pocket.

If you cash in the 401k to buy the biggest projector, mount, and 2.35 setup, and a no-exclusions extended warranty on the entire thing... you will find the termite-infested joist, still attached to the remains of your projector on the floor.

Funny. But if you buy that $10k white leather couch you'll kill the ANSI contrast on your top-dollar screen anyway. One of the many things to consider in the design phase.
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post #388 of 816 Old 05-01-2009, 03:16 AM
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Here is another one - still probably not to late to fix.

I would make sure the lights are on a remote control dimmer. I put in a dimmer and I have all the lights on one switch and thought this would be enough, but the process of watching a movie goes as follows.

Walk in the theater (which is pitch black - no lights and no windows) and turn on the light. Sit on the couch. Then turn on the cable box, projector, and receiver. When the projector warms up get up and dim or turn off the lights. Sit back down.

Actually right now the process is a little different. I do have 6 remotes for the lights. I tell on of the kids to turn of the lights while I sit on the couch, but one day I do envision watching a movie by myself and having to get off the couch to adjust the lights.
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post #389 of 816 Old 05-01-2009, 12:59 PM
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Don't think this has been mentioned yet, but take pictures of all your framing/electrical/ducting *before* you cover it in drywall.

Three years from now when you wonder if that vertical run of Romex that you want to tap into to add another outlet is 3 studs or 4 studs away from the wall, you can look at the photos and know before you poke a hole in the drywall.

-Suntan
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post #390 of 816 Old 05-01-2009, 01:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suntan View Post

Don't think this has been mentioned yet, but take pictures of all your framing/electrical/ducting *before* you cover it in drywall.

Three years from now when you wonder if that vertical run of Romex that you want to tap into to add another outlet is 3 studs or 4 studs away from the wall, you can look at the photos and know before you poke a hole in the drywall.

-Suntan

YES!! Can't believe I forgot that one. I did this and it has been very useful.
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