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post #451 of 863 Old 09-12-2009, 09:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjg100 View Post

Look into zone control: www.retrozone.com/index.htm
I used the flex damper system. Easy to install and it works well. I converted an existing room into an HT. Since the HT is located upstairs I placed the HT and bedrooms on the same zone. Install a remote sensor in the HT room. This way you can use the remote sensor to kick on the AC when needed. My room used to get hot, but now I can keep it nice and comfortable no matter how long I run the projector.

Thank you for the suggestion.

However, as far as I can tell that system requires you already have a comprehensive HVAC system installed, which I do not. My old house has hot water radiator heating and an installed Spacepack Air-conditioning system (Air Conditioner installed on top of our house, pipes were run through our walls into each room to provide air flow). We can not separately control the air conditioning flow to each room; it's either on or off.
I wouldn't want to power up the whole system in the winter, just to try to cool one room. That is why I figure I may have to try something like a ductless air conditioner just for my home theater room, if things get too hot with the room closed off.
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post #452 of 863 Old 09-12-2009, 06:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by R Harkness View Post

Thank you for the suggestion.

However, as far as I can tell that system requires you already have a comprehensive HVAC system installed, which I do not. My old house has hot water radiator heating and an installed Spacepack Air-conditioning system (Air Conditioner installed on top of our house, pipes were run through our walls into each room to provide air flow). We can not separately control the air conditioning flow to each room; it's either on or off.
I wouldn't want to power up the whole system in the winter, just to try to cool one room. That is why I figure I may have to try something like a ductless air conditioner just for my home theater room, if things get too hot with the room closed off.

If its cold outside isn't there a way to get some of that cold air into just that room? Lot less electricity and possibly less noise.
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post #453 of 863 Old 09-20-2009, 05:40 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by R Harkness View Post

Thank you for the suggestion.

However, as far as I can tell that system requires you already have a comprehensive HVAC system installed, which I do not. My old house has hot water radiator heating and an installed Spacepack Air-conditioning system (Air Conditioner installed on top of our house, pipes were run through our walls into each room to provide air flow). We can not separately control the air conditioning flow to each room; it's either on or off.
I wouldn't want to power up the whole system in the winter, just to try to cool one room. That is why I figure I may have to try something like a ductless air conditioner just for my home theater room, if things get too hot with the room closed off.

I am talking about summer time cooling, when you are already running the AC. For winter time all you need to do is pipe in some outside air.
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post #454 of 863 Old 09-21-2009, 06:46 AM
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Thanks. I'll see how things go. Once my curtains are up in a couple of weeks, allowing me to block off the room entrance, then I'll see how hot things get.
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post #455 of 863 Old 09-21-2009, 10:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjg100 View Post

I am talking about summer time cooling, when you are already running the AC. For winter time all you need to do is pipe in some outside air.

This is exactly what I'm in the process of doing right now! I bought a variable speed inline duct fan and added a new vent in the theater and then working on getting the outside vent installed. Its basically a bath van in reverse, with the fan outside the room.

The hope is that by running the fan a low speeds that I'll get a good flow of fresh air into the room when I'm not needing to run the AC. I think it'll work great in the fall and spring, but will be curious to see how it works when its really cold outside and I want to just cool the theater a little.
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post #456 of 863 Old 09-23-2009, 08:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by strange_brew View Post

Another one just came up in my HT thread - make sure you wire your PJ outlet so you can use a UPS!! I missed that one completely.

It was quite interesting explaining the concept to my electrician as to why I wanted to do that. It's great though - I got the entire thing setup with a UPS.
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post #457 of 863 Old 09-24-2009, 04:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twashade View Post

This is exactly what I'm in the process of doing right now! I bought a variable speed inline duct fan and added a new vent in the theater and then working on getting the outside vent installed. Its basically a bath van in reverse, with the fan outside the room.

The hope is that by running the fan a low speeds that I'll get a good flow of fresh air into the room when I'm not needing to run the AC. I think it'll work great in the fall and spring, but will be curious to see how it works when its really cold outside and I want to just cool the theater a little.

That's what I do and it works great.

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post #458 of 863 Old 09-26-2009, 05:47 PM
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What I would do differently...

Remove sharp and heavy object from atop my ladder before moving it.

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post #459 of 863 Old 09-27-2009, 12:19 AM
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That's not even a joke. I had an impact driver land on my head from a 12 foot ladder. Luckily neither my head nor the tool were damaged beyond repair!
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post #460 of 863 Old 09-28-2009, 08:45 AM
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Few things:

1. Paint quicker and/or remove painters tape earlier. Took me months to find the time to paint the basement and now that it's done I'm removing the tape (from months ago) and it's taking all the paint up with it, when it comes off at all.

2. Paint in the right order and be more careful while painting. The amount of times I've hit the ceiling with the wall roller and vise versa is amazing. Now I'm painting the baseboard after I've done the walls and I'm going to have to go back and repaint the bottom of the walls.

3. Pay someone to paint my basement. I thought it would take no time at all but for someone with zero painting skills and a frustrating basement layout (retrofit theater) I'd just as soon have paid someone $500 and be done with it in a week.
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post #461 of 863 Old 09-28-2009, 09:34 AM
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I actually painted all my walls before putting in the flooring, baseboards, and crown molding. I could be as quick and sloppy (at the edges) as I wanted. I ended up getting the whole basement finished in a few hours.

I also used premium plus Behr paint, so only one coat was needed over the primer.
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post #462 of 863 Old 09-28-2009, 02:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moguy View Post

I actually painted all my walls before putting in the flooring, baseboards, and crown molding. I could be as quick and sloppy (at the edges) as I wanted. I ended up getting the whole basement finished in a few hours.

I also used premium plus Behr paint, so only one coat was needed over the primer.

My basement's ceiling is multi-leveled because of an I-beam the builders framed around. I don't see any "nice" way to get crown moulding in.

Trying to get a straight, solid line to divide the black ceiling and grey walls is just hell. I've tried taping (it bleeds under anyway) and one of those Sure cutting-in tools, the kind on 2 small wheels (only gets to about a cm from the ceiling - useless).

I think my last resort is to go around the room with a finer brush and just creep into the corners very slowly and tediously...
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post #463 of 863 Old 09-28-2009, 02:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Logic_BomB View Post

I've tried taping (it bleeds under anyway)

I've never tried this painting a room, but I used to build R/C model airplanes. We would tape, then paint the tape edge with a clear, let that almost dry and THEN paint the color. Then the tape has to come off before completely dry. The results were absolutely, perfectly straight lines. But I don't even know if there's a "clear" you can use for painting walls.
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post #464 of 863 Old 09-29-2009, 03:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erkq View Post

I've never tried this painting a room, but I used to build R/C model airplanes. We would tape, then paint the tape edge with a clear, let that almost dry and THEN paint the color. Then the tape has to come off before completely dry. The results were absolutely, perfectly straight lines. But I don't even know if there's a "clear" you can use for painting walls.

Instead of "clear" seal the tape edge with the color of the paint that is below the tape. Then paint the wall like normal.

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post #465 of 863 Old 09-29-2009, 05:03 AM
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Alternatively, as I've seen on an episode of Holmes on Homes, do the first coat with an almost dry brush which just seals it but doesn't have enough paint to bleed under. then the second coat will go on without troubles. Worked for me many times.
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post #466 of 863 Old 09-29-2009, 09:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cathan View Post

Instead of "clear" seal the tape edge with the color of the paint that is below the tape. Then paint the wall like normal.

Brilliant!
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post #467 of 863 Old 10-11-2009, 03:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by R Harkness View Post

Well my project is into it's second year, planning and building. At some points I've definitely been stoked and had some fun designing my theater (I hire various contractors to get what I want built, but every inch is custom designed by me with help from an architect friend).

But a lot of the times it's just been brutal. I'm frankly very, very sick of the whole process and not having fun anymore. It's almost done though.

The good thing is that for picky folk like me I get just what I want. All that time of thinking things through, looking at every alternative angle to do something, may have extended the project but also seems to have paid off as everything seems "just right" in the room so far.

Sometimes, due to all the mess and effort, I almost regret how much I've put into the project and think "Maybe I should have just done something simpler and been happy."
But I know that isn't me, ultimately. I would have picked nits. So intead I really went for it on all fronts to get what I want, figuring if I got the room right at this point I could just forget about it and stick to possible equiment upgrades in the future.

One issue that I may well end up regretting is cooling for the room. I did consult some HVAC and cooling guys, but they said it would be noisy and/or expensive to do anything big for my room (it's an existing living room renoed into home theater).
They said things should be ok as is - I have all the equipment, save the projector, in another room. And there is some air conditioning in there. But once I have curtains blocking off the room opening I'm afraid things might get too warm, especially in winter when we aren't running air conditioning. I'm hoping I won't end up having to buy an air conditioner for the room to watch movies!

You could look into a Mitsubishi Mr Slim ductless heating/cooling.
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post #468 of 863 Old 10-12-2009, 02:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike2060 View Post

You could look into a Mitsubishi Mr Slim ductless heating/cooling.

Thank you. I've been looking into ductless cooling. Although I finally got my curtains in so I can close off the room. At this point things don't seem to be getting too hot.
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post #469 of 863 Old 10-12-2009, 02:59 PM
 
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things I would do differently...

I'd probably go all the way back to get a larger house instead of trying to convert a small room into a man cave. The cave part is spot on, low ceilings, dark (no natural light) but I want a bigger room period.

Oh well, gotta do what you gotta do with what you have
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post #470 of 863 Old 10-15-2009, 11:14 AM
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Wow. I'm the king of learning through bad experiences it seems. Here's a tip that will save you some ripped out hair:

Make sure if you caulk cracks in the baseboards (which mine had extensively, almost the entire way around the room), you don't use 100% silicone (non-paintable) caulk. I tried to touch up/paint the baseboards today and it was like oil and water. ARH!!!
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post #471 of 863 Old 10-15-2009, 11:30 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Logic_BomB View Post

Wow. I'm the king of learning through bad experiences it seems. Here's a tip that will save you some ripped out hair:

Make sure if you caulk cracks in the baseboards (which mine had extensively, almost the entire way around the room), you don't use 100% silicone (non-paintable) caulk. I tried to touch up/paint the baseboards today and it was like oil and water. ARH!!!

You can use latex with silicone. Lasts longer than regular latex and works real smooth. If you need a custom color to match your paint. Buy white and squeeze it out of the tube into a plastic bowl. Clean all white caulk residue from inside the tube. Add some (water based) paint to the caulk in the bowl and mix with a spatula. Keep adding paint in small amounts until it matches. Use spatula to get the caulk back into the tube. Tap the tube while filling to get out the trapped air. Stick the end cap back on the tube and caulk away.
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post #472 of 863 Old 10-15-2009, 01:27 PM
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I bought a different caulk to basically put a coat over the silicone stuff I already used. It's DAP brand and it's latex w/ silicone added, fully paintable, etc...

It's just a real bummer and hit to the motivation that I did the whole room only to find I have a redo the whole room directly over the work I just did.

I've read online that there is no "great" way to undo what I've done. The options boiled down to ripping it all up and re-doing OR rubbing it all down with alcohol followed by coating with a clear shelack OR put a layer of latex caulk over it (trying this since it's "easiest").
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post #473 of 863 Old 10-18-2009, 06:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by strange_brew View Post

Another one just came up in my HT thread - make sure you wire your PJ outlet so you can use a UPS!! I missed that one completely.

Newbie question: what is a UPS and how do I need to be using it????

I am in the pre-drywall phase right now and the electrician is doing the wiring. The builder has a HDMI prewire option that I elected with includes running and hdmi cable to the ceiling and an outlet right next to it. Is that enough?
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post #474 of 863 Old 10-18-2009, 07:08 PM
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Uninterupted Power Supply.

The easiest way is to use a powerbridge to the projector from the rack. Monoprice has one, or you can cobble together the parts locally, or you can buy the "Powerbridge" branded product. Run a search here and you can find a couple threads.
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post #475 of 863 Old 10-19-2009, 08:48 AM
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Can someone put up a link to the monoprice version of the powerbridge as mentioned above? Tried searching their site and couldn't come up with anything. Much appreciated.

Dan
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post #476 of 863 Old 10-19-2009, 07:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by advertguy2 View Post

Can someone put up a link to the monoprice version of the powerbridge as mentioned above? Tried searching their site and couldn't come up with anything. Much appreciated.

Dan

http://www.monoprice.com/products/pr...seq=1&format=2
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post #477 of 863 Old 10-20-2009, 04:58 AM
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Thanks!!
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post #478 of 863 Old 10-20-2009, 10:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suntan View Post

Don’t think this has been mentioned yet, but take pictures of all your framing/electrical/ducting *before* you cover it in drywall.

Three years from now when you wonder if that vertical run of Romex that you want to tap into to add another outlet is 3 studs or 4 studs away from the wall, you can look at the photos and know before you poke a hole in the drywall.

I didn't do this and I'm regretting it.

This may also save you from having to tear open a wall in the future, if you didn't get permits and some day you need an inspector to sign off the work. Really thorough documentation and pictures might be enough to satisfy them (and might help sway a nervous prospective home buyer).

Here's one of the best tips I can offer: When choosing layout, colors, carpet, etc., remember that some day you're probably going to put the house up for sale, and you'll need the theater to be attractive to a wide variety of prospective buyers. Keep the colors muted and tasteful. Make sure it looks professional, not DIY (even if it is).

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post #479 of 863 Old 10-30-2009, 08:34 AM
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Wow what a great thread. I've finally read through the whole thing. I'm still at least a year away from starting my theater in my basement, but I've already thought of something to add to this. I'm fortunate enough to only have 1 of the 4 walls against the foundation in my layout so I'm definitely not finishing the backside of the other 3 until the theater is up and running the way I want it. I don't care if it's less efficient from a building standpoint to do a basement in pieces. In the end the room will be finished faster, and I'll be able to change almost anything up until the last minute.

Something else I thought of that would've been a mistake for sure..... for those of us in the northern states that usually have to worry about our basements getting too cold as opposed to too hot....I think the simplest way to solve the HVAC issue is to run electric strips under the floor ahead of time. It's silent and very comfortable.

Hopefully this thread is still going in a couple years when I'll have more suggestions to add.
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post #480 of 863 Old 10-30-2009, 09:56 AM - Thread Starter
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For those of you in the Northern States who think you don't need cooling in your theater in the winter ... probably worth rethinking that.

Dennis Erskine CFI, CFII, MEI
Architectural Acoustics
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Certified Home Theater Designer
CEDIA Board of Directors
www.erskine-group.com
www.CinemaForte.net
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