What I'd do differently next time. - Page 24 - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 31Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #691 of 885 Old 07-05-2011, 01:00 PM
Member
 
PeterB123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 123
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by stepyourgameup View Post

It's not small, it's intimate.

lol

Well, I guess since 50% of the time, it's just me in there (awesome), it's not too bad.
PeterB123 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #692 of 885 Old 07-05-2011, 01:08 PM
AVS Special Member
 
elmalloc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Cleveland, OH
Posts: 4,776
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by npc2396 View Post

I am amazed at how much better the mouse ears absorb the camera flash compared to the "very black"

Are you speaking of Behr's Disney Mouse Ears paint?

Current Projects:
IN PROGRESS (80%) - Building 3D Theater room.
IN PROGRESS (30%) - Building Lounge/Hallway Area.
IN PROGRESS (15%) - Building Home LAN (4 PCs).
ON HOLD - Building Home Gym.
ON HOLD - Building Simulation Room (Eyefinity).
ON HOLD - Building Theater room (Sim2 HT380, 2.35 14ft wide).
elmalloc is offline  
post #693 of 885 Old 07-05-2011, 01:41 PM
AVS Special Member
 
stepyourgameup's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Kansas
Posts: 1,469
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by elmalloc View Post

Are you speaking of Behr's Disney Mouse Ears paint?

Also, why don't you paint your walls dark also?

Alcohol. The cause of and solution to all of life's problems.
stepyourgameup is offline  
post #694 of 885 Old 07-05-2011, 01:48 PM
AVS Special Member
 
stepyourgameup's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Kansas
Posts: 1,469
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 29
Don't assume that you can easily pull the slack out of Romex thru an outlet box after drywall is up. I ended up having to cut the box with a utility knife and Drimmel to get the Romex to pull all the way out. Instead, either go ahead and wire the outlets or tie off the Romex and stuff it in the box.

Alcohol. The cause of and solution to all of life's problems.
stepyourgameup is offline  
post #695 of 885 Old 07-05-2011, 04:58 PM
Member
 
npc2396's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Avon Lake, Ohio
Posts: 170
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Yes , Disney mouse ears.

The gray is actually very dark but the flash is really lighting it up. With just the 4 - 4" can lights on the grey is almost indistinguishable from the blue.
npc2396 is offline  
post #696 of 885 Old 08-03-2011, 08:06 AM
AVS Special Member
 
JustMike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
Posts: 2,239
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Liked: 21
Great advice! The third contractor I brought in to look at my theater space said, "Why don't you rotate everything 90 degrees and take out that wall?" The result is that I went from a cramped 15x18 foot space to an 18x24-foot space that will eventually seat 11.

Mike Kobb
(Formerly "ReplayMike". These opinions are mine alone, and in no way reflect the opinions of employers past or present!)
"Mike's Money Pit" Build Thread
JustMike is offline  
post #697 of 885 Old 08-03-2011, 08:52 AM
AVS Special Member
 
stepyourgameup's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Kansas
Posts: 1,469
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidK442 View Post

One thing I don't regret (not really the purpose of this thread but what the heck) is the decision to not sound proof. I see the extent to which some go to keep sound in and out and wonder if it is really worth it. Loss of space, money, time. Often more effort goes into sound proofing then anything else; multiple layers of drywall, sound clips, green glue, solid doors, magical forcefields! I suppose it is one of those large details that separates the good from the great but I have never regretted not doing it. When the family is asleep I turn the volume down a bit, when they are awake I turn it up. Besides, I think I would feel a bit uneasy if I couldn't hear the kids killing each other.

My only concern with sound proofing was to keep the HVAC noise out of the theater, which is in the next room. I didn't put in an air return in the theater but there is one next to the theater door in the other room and I cut a 1/2" off the bottom of the door to allow air to go under. I hope that it will suffice or I will have to put in a dead vent or some such.

Alcohol. The cause of and solution to all of life's problems.
stepyourgameup is offline  
post #698 of 885 Old 08-03-2011, 09:35 AM
Member
 
chris bryant's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Pueblo, Colorado
Posts: 182
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by stepyourgameup View Post

My only concern with sound proofing was to keep the HVAC noise out of the theater, which is in the next room. I didn't put in an air return in the theater but there is one next to the theater door in the other room and I cut a 1/2" off the bottom of the door to allow air to go under. I hope that it will suffice or I will have to put in a dead vent or some such.

You will regret not having a return vent in the TR, even if it is a small room. Too much body heat build up. Undercutting the door does not work well even for a small bedroom. Try using an insulated rolled duct for the return air and try to keep the run as long as possible. The return air duct does not cause as much noise as the supply air. That should be an insulated duct as shown in my previous post's here, if possible. Or at least try to use 1" rolled fiberglass insulation as best as possible.

Add a sub 2x4 insulated wall between the furnace room and the TR, and/or add 1/2" sound board, found at Home Depot, on the furnace side of the TR wall. Lay some carpert down in the funace floor area, which will help with sound deflection from the furnace motor and ducts.

I disagree that sound proofing does not make a difference. There is a reason why recording studios use "magical force fields" to improve sound quality. It is more about sound deflection. Using insulated drapes on the side walls is an inexpensive way to help sound quality and is a cheap way to give a home TR an expensive professional look. Again, there is a reason why Theaters use them. Just my 2 cents.
chris bryant is offline  
post #699 of 885 Old 08-03-2011, 10:13 AM
AVS Special Member
 
stepyourgameup's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Kansas
Posts: 1,469
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by chris bryant View Post

You will regret not having a return vent in the TR, even if it is a small room. Too much body heat build up. Undercutting the door does not work well even for a small bedroom. Try using an insulated rolled duct for the return air and try to keep the run as long as possible. The return air duct does not cause as much noise as the supply air. That should be an insulated duct as shown in my previous post's here, if possible. Or at least try to use 1" rolled fiberglass insulation as best as possible.

Add a sub 2x4 insulated wall between the furnace room and the TR, and/or add 1/2" sound board, found at Home Depot, on the furnace side of the TR wall. Lay some carpert down in the funace floor area, which will help with sound deflection from the furnace motor and ducts.

I disagree that sound proofing does not make a difference. There is a reason why recording studios use "magical force fields" to improve sound quality. It is more about sound deflection. Using insulated drapes on the side walls is an inexpensive way to help sound quality and is a cheap way to give a home TR an expensive professional look. Again, there is a reason why Theaters use them. Just my 2 cents.

I can tie into the return run if I need to. I guess I will do so if it is a problem.

Alcohol. The cause of and solution to all of life's problems.
stepyourgameup is offline  
post #700 of 885 Old 08-03-2011, 10:52 AM
AVS Special Member
 
JustMike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
Posts: 2,239
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Liked: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidK442 View Post

Third time the charm they say. 15X18 cramped? One man's hovel is another man's palace I suppose. Then again I would never have a need for 11 seats as typically it is just the family who uses the room. No link to your theater build?

Heh, yeah, 15x18 would have been okay, but I really wanted two rows of seats, and I couldn't make the geometry work out so that both rows would have good line of sight, good image sizes, and so forth.

I'm in the process of writing the first two long-winded postings for what will be my build thread. The theater construction itself got sidelined by larger renovation of the house, but it's truly underway at last! Look for "The Money Pit Theater", starting soon on an AVS build thread near you.

[Edit: Shucks. It looks like somebody else did a previous build called "The Money Pit". I'll have to come up with a different name...]

Mike Kobb
(Formerly "ReplayMike". These opinions are mine alone, and in no way reflect the opinions of employers past or present!)
"Mike's Money Pit" Build Thread
JustMike is offline  
post #701 of 885 Old 10-21-2011, 12:34 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Warren_G's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Saskatoon, SK
Posts: 1,025
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I too agree with a certain degree of soundproofing. I dont buy into the diminshing return value of all the steps that some take in soundproofing their room, but there are 2 valuable characteristics of taking some steps. Reduced noise floor, which increases your dynamic range in the theater as well as reducing distracting outside sound. And second, it allows you to use your theater at a higher volume at times when you may not be able to, such as when people are sleeping somewhere in the house.

My soundproofing strategy in my theater was less about hightech materials and methods like GG, DD, etc. and more about decoupling from the floor above and wall beside the room. It didnt cost much extra to do it this way, but the result is that I can lose myself in my room without bothering others or being disturbed by outside sounds.
Warren_G is offline  
post #702 of 885 Old 10-23-2011, 06:03 PM
Member
 
Arialis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 115
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
MY sub shakes the room and I can hear the front wall and ceiling rattle when the sub kicks in. The HT is almost ten years old and I am so debating doing the front wall and ceiling to address this issue....

But Id have to shut down the theater and I dont wanna do that lol..
Arialis is offline  
post #703 of 885 Old 03-04-2012, 02:49 PM
Member
 
95silverstallion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 45
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Im only part way through my build but I will tel you one thing that would be a no brainer for me...Dont buy alot of lumber at once and dont get it delivered. If youre a weekend only project person like me then only buy the lumber you will use for that weekend. It sucks making a trip to the lumber yard everytime you need lumber but...I had about 150 studs delivered and over the course of a month about 50 studs were IMO unusable.

Ive been much happier getting 30 or so studs and using them up over the weekend. This way I can pick through at the store for staright ones and use them immediately. No junk wood delivered and no time for the studs to lay around and warp.
95silverstallion is offline  
post #704 of 885 Old 03-06-2012, 07:50 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
Mfusick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Western MA
Posts: 24,089
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 191 Post(s)
Liked: 995

-

"Too much is almost enough. Anything in life worth doing is worth overdoing. Moderation is for cowards."
Mfusick is online now  
post #705 of 885 Old 03-06-2012, 10:04 PM
AVS Special Member
 
stepyourgameup's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Kansas
Posts: 1,469
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post


That's what I call a kitchen remodel.

Who is that dime piece in the picture?

Alcohol. The cause of and solution to all of life's problems.
stepyourgameup is offline  
post #706 of 885 Old 03-15-2012, 02:27 AM
Member
 
mrci10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 21
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
If I could to do things over again, I would've made more money!

That way I could've had the theater designed first then designed the house, then built the house and purchased all the equipment/furnishings all at the same time.

I've been purchasing audio/video toys for several years, trading up as I go along. I bought what I thought was the best theater speaker system--Paradigm Signature Series 8. Only to later learn that the very tall (48”) tower mains will be sitting on top of a 12" stage—With the tweaters at the top of these tall main speakers they will be almost in line with the top of the screen--and way over the top of my head/ears. Also, there will be no way to place the center channel tweater in line with the main tweaters.

Maybe this massive speaker system wasn’t the best system to place behind a movie screen.

mrci10 is offline  
post #707 of 885 Old 03-16-2012, 04:05 PM
Member
 
cme4brain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: South Eastern Virginia, USA
Posts: 69
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 12
You know what? I completely agree with post about not spending $$$ on sound proofing. I have saved big $$$ by not doing the same thing. So what if the fam hears some home theater sounds once in a whole? Like we haven't heard kids yelling, playing their music, playing their games? The money is better spent, for me, one better speakers!
cme4brain is offline  
post #708 of 885 Old 03-16-2012, 06:12 PM
AVS Special Member
 
JustMike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
Posts: 2,239
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Liked: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by cme4brain View Post

You know what? I completely agree with post about not spending $$$ on sound proofing. I have saved big $$$ by not doing the same thing. So what if the fam hears some home theater sounds once in a whole? Like we haven't heard kids yelling, playing their music, playing their games? The money is better spent, for me, one better speakers!

The trick with soundproofing IMO is to keep extraneous noise out of the theater. I, like you, wasn't concerned about keeping theater sounds from leaking out. Everybody's situations will differ of course.

Mike Kobb
(Formerly "ReplayMike". These opinions are mine alone, and in no way reflect the opinions of employers past or present!)
"Mike's Money Pit" Build Thread
JustMike is offline  
post #709 of 885 Old 03-16-2012, 08:40 PM
Member
 
95silverstallion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 45
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I had all my audiostuff in my regular living room and would crank movies up loud with a 4yo and a 1yo in bed. They never wake up front it. Im not concerned about the new dedicated theater in the basement being noisy.
95silverstallion is offline  
post #710 of 885 Old 03-17-2012, 12:28 AM
AVS Special Member
 
nickbuol's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: Marion, Iowa
Posts: 1,838
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 56 Post(s)
Liked: 221
I am so glad that I focused time, energy, and money on soundproofing. Some of the big "bang for your buck" stuff really isnt that expensive in the scheme of things. I have a great location in my basement, but it is right below our master bedroom. There are many times that I want to stay up land watch something and my wife wants to go to bed. Since I enjoy movies a little loud, the soundproofing let's me still enjoy my theater without keeping my wife awake. It isn't perfect, but perfection would have cost significantly more.
nickbuol is offline  
post #711 of 885 Old 03-17-2012, 07:40 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Club Gold
 
Dennis Erskine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Near an airport
Posts: 9,143
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Liked: 46
Quote:


You know what? I completely agree with post about not spending $$$ on sound proofing. I have saved big $$$ by not doing the same thing. So what if the fam hears some home theater sounds once in a whole? Like we haven't heard kids yelling, playing their music, playing their games? The money is better spent, for me, one better speakers!

You know what? That's not the reason for sound isolation (although in some families it is). The quietest sound on a sound track is 22dB. The average ambient background noise floor in a quiet residence is 33 to 35 dB. To overcome the noise floor, that's a 6 times increase. Playing a 22dB sound at 34dB is no big deal. Playing normal dialog six times louder is a big deal and not very comfortable. Playing a 105 dB peak six times louder can be painful ... can result in temporary hearing loss ... the good news is, it is very likely your amplifiers will clip or your speakers become damaged so you don't have to worry about it anymore. Bad room + good speakers = bad sound. Just the way it is.

Budget, physical constraints, etc. may get in the way of sound isolation efforts but you're better off with a better room and less expensive equipment than the alternative.

Dennis Erskine CFI, CFII, MEI
Architectural Acoustics
Subject Matter Expert
Certified Home Theater Designer
CEDIA Board of Directors
www.erskine-group.com
www.CinemaForte.net
Dennis Erskine is offline  
post #712 of 885 Old 03-21-2012, 09:37 AM
Advanced Member
 
chinaclipper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: I live in the great Midwest!
Posts: 577
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dennis Erskine View Post

Budget, physical constraints, etc. may get in the way of sound isolation efforts but you're better off with a better room and less expensive equipment than the alternative.

Dennis I have said this for YEARS.
I spent a few more dollars on the room, vs speakers, and I have NEVER regretted it.
Newbies sit in my theater, and absolutely RAVE, then I have so much fun when they try to guess how much I paid for speakers. (and they ALWAYS guess WAAAAAY high). I usually wait until they guess like $20k or more. (and they ALWAYS do ) Truth? $400 system "speakers-in-a-box"

FLOORS them...."No way!!" and "ARE YOU KIDDING ME?!?!?!"
Then I show 'em.

Point? IMHO, it is the room design/acoustic treatment that gives the best "bang for your buck", NOT expensive speakers.

_______________________
Le Cinema Rockhurst
See my build progress here!!
 

chinaclipper is offline  
post #713 of 885 Old 03-23-2012, 07:41 PM
Advanced Member
 
cdika17's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posts: 715
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Liked: 20
I pulled these from Jautor's build thread, some really good points, hope he does not mind.

"LESSON/MISTAKE: Having the risers built-in as part of the structure means it's not possible to undo the theater and turn the space into something else. Not that I would ever do that, but it could be a turn-off to potential future owners. While it would be possible to fill in the front of the room, lowering the rear riser would be a huge challenge."

"LESSON: At the time, Dennis' AVS-special design service wasn't available, and having shopped for other design services (which I deemed too expensive at the "basic" service level for the amount of additional expertise I would gain), I didn't use any of them. Having seen Dennis' design work here, and for the price he offers the AVS service, I *HOPE* that if I was starting from scratch today I would be smart enough to send him a check! I did get a lot of free advice from industry experts and manufacturers by visiting them at CEDIA, and of course, reading lots and lots of AVSforum threads. "

"MISTAKE: Having the risers built-in as part of the structure means it's not possible to undo the theater and turn the space into something else. Not that I would ever do that, but it could be a turn-off to potential future owners. While it would be possible to fill in the front of the room, lowering the rear riser would be a huge challenge.

MISTAKE: I also made the risers 5'9" deep, also using some chair dimensions (see LESSON above). In the final theater, there's just enough space for the Berklines to recline fully. "

"IF I DID IT OVER: I'd have made the room 17'x 24', adding a foot of width (6" to each aisle), with at least 1' longer to the front, and 6" more on each riser. But I would have stuck with my final seating plan. If I had the room up front, I might have put in a small stage, but I don't consider the lack of a stage as a mistake, either."

"MISTAKE: Plan all your speaker locations before the room shell is constructed. When I built the house, I had a space in the back for a pull-out rack, so rack access wasn't going to be a problem. And I made the rack area large enough for a small countertop - likely for a popcorn machine. But I didn't think about where the rear speakers needed to be. Turned out one of them really needed to be in the middle of that cabinet area. If I placed the speaker column inside of the cabinet location, the two rear speakers would be only 4' apart. Nope, speaker placement wins, cabinet goes away. In hindsight, that cabinet was unnecessary. Popcorn machine is hot, noisy and smelly (all in a good way!) - and is therefore better off outside the theater. I had a lot of U space in my rack, so I added a drawer there for remote/accessory storage, which works great."

"IF I DID IT OVER: The rack area will later be drywalled with everything else. But the AX-S pull-out rack is intended to be used with "millwork". I should have finished the rack recess area with a site-built cabinetry box. The small, drywall covered space isn't perfectly square/flush, so when I pull the rack out, it tends to rub on one corner, which makes me get out the touch-up paint. A cabinet could have been made easily to the proper dimensions, and slipped into place. I purchased the Gasket/Guide kit for the rack to fill any gaps - turns out I don't have any gaps, it's too tight a fit even for the guides!"

"MISTAKE: (This is the big one, which is great, because it didn't really impact the final outcome) aka:

IF I DID IT OVER: The columns, all 6 of them, were then framed out to be covered in drywall. This meant that the interior of the column is outside the treated theater space, and therefore all the things penetrating it are creating holes in the theater. Little things like the step and sconce light electrical boxes. And, um, that in-wall 6"x12" speaker. D'oh.

In hindsight, those columns should have been built post-drywall, with only small holes for electrical and low-volt. Thenn the speakers would have been enclosed within the room. The result is that as they are, a lot of surround sound can be heard in the attic space on one side of the theater, and it's also transmitted from the rears to the stairwell behind the room. The good news is that because the theater is placed away from bedrooms, and it's only the 'surround' channels, it had no real negative consequences for me. I may box in the side columns from the attic side to reduce transmission there, but it's only a nitpick for me. But your milage would definitely vary...

The same is true, to a lesser extent, of the ceiling framing. The can lights also penetrate the room shell, not a post-sheetrock soffit. But again, this is a second floor, the attic above is filled with blown insulation, and is geographically isolated from the rest of the house. In the end, with music playing at high volume from all channels, I can barely hear the transmission outside, and not from the bedrooms. Most of the sound that does make it into the adjacent gameroom is coming through the solid-core theater door (you can feel it vibrate)."

"IF I DID IT OVER: I would have used two separate PowerBridge inlets behind the rack, one going to the projector location, the other to the front of the room (for speakers/subs/screen). The reason is that if I wanted later to install a UPS in the rack for the projector, the way it's wired now, the subwoofer and everything else at the front of the room would also be on the battery backup. Had I wired separate inlets, I could have run the projector to the UPS, and the screen wall outlets just to the conditioner/surge protector. Now, this is probably not a big deal as it is, as "run time on UPS battery" is not the goal here."

"IF I DID IT OVER: Since the GrafikEye will be installed in the entry hallway, I decided to add 2 wall stations where one would expect the light switch(es) to be in the room. One just inside the room, and another next to the rack. In reality, with the remote control working well, I rarely use those wallstations, and at ~$200/each probably would have skipped at least one, if not both of them."

"LESSON/MISTAKE: With all the recessed lights on, it's still not bright enough in the room to read comfortably from the seating locations. Not an issue for theater use, but I ran into it many times with instruction manuals! I can crank up the sconces, but the direct glare from those at full power doesn't help the situation.

IF I DID IT OVER: I probably would have added 3" recessed can lights in the soffit above the seating locations, which of course would also have helped force me to the 8-zone GrafikEye."

"My advice is to follow what I did (based on advice from other AVS'ers):

1) Wait until the room is complete before actually buying the projector
2) Wait until you have the projector before finalizing the screen size
3) Test screen size in the real space before hitting the "Buy" button..."

-----------------------------------------------
Chase "Fetch"


Current Theater Build
 

New House Build

 

cdika17 is offline  
post #714 of 885 Old 04-19-2012, 01:20 PM
Member
 
Drakul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Houston
Posts: 103
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 11
When you prewire for 7.1 make sure the mid speakers are at our behind your seating position.

Try not to have as much of a half-dome ceiling which can wreak havoc on your screen placement and all your measurements.

PUT A PLUG IN THE FLOOR! For your power recline seats.
Drakul is offline  
post #715 of 885 Old 04-20-2012, 10:16 AM
235
Senior Member
 
235's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Winnipeg
Posts: 490
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 21
Secretly start the room planning/design phase long before the family knows about it. Otherwise you'll get plenty of "what's taking so long, just build it already" type of comments . Designing every detail of the room before construction takes a lot of time but also avoids painting yourself in a corner later. Sketchup is your uncompromising friend.
BrolicBeast likes this.
235 is offline  
post #716 of 885 Old 04-20-2012, 10:58 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Brad Horstkotte's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 5,123
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Liked: 57
Re: SketchUp - one tip: use components / composites liberally! If you don't (I didn't), its pretty easy to get to the point where editing the drawing becomes extremely difficult - to the point where I basically just stopped keeping mine up to date, and winged it the rest of the way.
Brad Horstkotte is offline  
post #717 of 885 Old 04-20-2012, 11:44 AM
Senior Member
 
willscam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 364
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by 235 View Post

Secretly start the room planning/design phase long before the family knows about it. Otherwise you'll get plenty of "what's taking so long, just build it already" type of comments . Designing every detail of the room before construction takes a lot of time but also avoids painting yourself in a corner later. Sketchup is your uncompromising friend.

+1. I spent 2 years planning and researching and have spent 3 months, so far, building. Almost everyday, since I actually started physically working on the theater, my wife asks "So, are we watching a movie in your theater tonight?". It's as if she thinks I've been building it for over two years.

"Trying is the first step towards failure" - Homer Simpson

 

willscam is offline  
post #718 of 885 Old 04-20-2012, 01:22 PM
AVS Special Member
 
tony123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Upstate, South Carolina
Posts: 4,994
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 25
I'm on year 4... Something wrong with that?

The "Twinseltown" Theater
Construction Thread
tony123 is offline  
post #719 of 885 Old 04-20-2012, 01:59 PM
Advanced Member
 
BroncoSport's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Wichita, KS
Posts: 757
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 20
Slow down speedy! I'm on year 7 (I believe). But in all fairness to the excuses, I took about a 5 year break and restarted the build... 2 months ago. I am now hoping for finishing it this summer/fall.
BroncoSport is offline  
post #720 of 885 Old 04-20-2012, 02:10 PM
Senior Member
 
willscam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 364
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Ahem.. no no, Tony, nothing wrong with that. I'm sure you'll be finished any day now.

I cheated and started with an already finished room. My goal is to complete it in 6 months. We'll see....

"Trying is the first step towards failure" - Homer Simpson

 

willscam is offline  
Reply Dedicated Theater Design & Construction



Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off