Testing speaker lines without receiver? - AVS Forum
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Old 12-29-2007, 10:21 PM - Thread Starter
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Hey guys,

I'd like to start hooking up my speakers and close up my soffit where the speaker wire is run. Is there a quick and easy way to test each speaker run without having to set up the reciever?

Id hate to close it up and fine that one of them does not work.

Thanks
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Old 12-29-2007, 10:39 PM
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How about a Ohms meter and check for resistance, tie one end of the speaker wire and check the other work for me.
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Old 12-29-2007, 10:52 PM
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Another method if you don't have a multimeter - if you have a speaker hooked up already (or one handy), you could take a 1.5V AA or AAA battery and briefly tap the wire ends to the battery and listen for the 'thump' of the cone excursion to confirm continuity.
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Old 12-31-2007, 03:56 PM
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I ususally do this with a 9Volt.

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Old 12-31-2007, 04:18 PM
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9volt for me as well
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Old 12-31-2007, 05:33 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas Aggie View Post

9volt for me as well

So just tap a 9V + and - with the + and - of the speaker wire and listen for the pop.

I can do that. Beats buying a meter

thanks!
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Old 12-31-2007, 08:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rsprance View Post

So just tap a 9V + and - with the + and - of the speaker wire and listen for the pop.


No need to try to match it up, but if you want you can make note if the woofer goes in or out. Then if you touch the same wires to the same polarity going around the room you can check to be sure that you haven't crossed any wires at the speaker connections.
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Old 01-01-2008, 06:15 AM
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Although the 9V speaker check sounds easy and pretty good, the best check would be with a multimeter. You need to check two things: a) that the wires are continuous from source to termination, and b) that they are not shorted to ground or each other.

With the leads at the termination end twisted together check the ohms reading from the source end. Depending on wire size and length, a typical reading will be 4 ohms.

Then, with the leads at both ends open, check the resistance between the conductors and from each conductor to ground. You should find very hi resistance, such as 30 meg ohms.
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Old 01-09-2008, 06:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandpiper View Post

With the leads at the termination end twisted together check the ohms reading from the source end. Depending on wire size and length, a typical reading will be 4 ohms.

I beg to differ. The round trip should be less than one ohm. In my case, using 12 gauge (Romex tm solid conductors) about 35 feet one way measured just over a half ohm for the round trip.

If you already installed speakers, using a speaker to complete the circuit at one end while measuring at the other end, you should still get well under 4 ohme. Four ohms' impedance for a speaker is measured at a reference frequency of about 1000 Hz. For DC, as from an ohmmeter, the "impedance" is much less. I would say less than one ohm for the speaker alone. Straight wires have about the same "impedance" at all audio frequencies.

When using a battery, particularly a 9 volt battery, to test for speaker phasing, be very brief. These tests drain a 9 volt or an AA battery heavily.

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Old 01-09-2008, 08:14 AM
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The resistance should definitely be less than one ohm. It will possibly show up on your multimeter as zero.
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Old 01-09-2008, 11:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Allan Jayne View Post

I beg to differ. The round trip should be less than one ohm.

Sorry. You are correct. A 50 foot run (100 feet round trip)with 16 gauge wire should be about 0.4 ohms.
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