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post #1 of 217 Old 02-13-2008, 03:34 PM - Thread Starter
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A Bonus Room Home Theater.

We have a bonus room above our three-car garage. The room is roughly 13 feet wide by 28 feet long. The ceiling is 8 feet in the center, but the center of the ceiling is only 8 feet wide. Beyond that, the ceiling slopes down to knee walls 64 inches high. There is a window at the far end, overlooking the street. My challenge ... to take this acoustically ideal room and turn it into a combination of thumpy muddled bass, unintelligible dialogue, and harsh reflections. Or do I have that backwards ... ?



I intend to board up the window in a fashion that it looks like a dark room from the street. That will be the screen-wall end of the room. I also intend to construct a new rear wall, so that the footprint of the theater is 13' x 21.5'. This will give me sufficient room for a lobby entryway into the theater, and will allow me to partition off an equipment room behind the projector. This will also be a craft room for my lovely and talented helper.

Floor Plan
Someday, when I actually get around to sketching the floor plan, I will put a picture of it here.

Screen
This will be a 2.40:1 Aspect Ratio theater. I am currently planning on using SMX Acoustically Transparent screen material for a DIY 102" x 42.67" screen. I bought the material before SMX stopped offering its fabric only. The screen material has been rolled up in the box it came in since I received it. I am hoping it hasn't become unusable for whatever reason. If it did, I'll need to rethink the screen.

Gear
I am planning all new gear for the theater. As I acquire gear, I will update this list, noting which items are in hand, and which items are more of a wish list.
Speakers
Left/Ctr/Right Paradigm Reference Studio SA-35
Side Surround Paradigm Reference Studio SA-ADP
Rear Surround Paradigm Reference Studio SA-30
Subwoofers (2) SVSound PC12-NSD

Onkyo NR-5008 A/V Receiver
Epson Pro Cinema 6010 Projector

Seating
Two rows of two. It seems so tiny. But with the way the ceiling slopes, and having to enter the room from the rear, I didn't have much choice. I might be able to squeeze a third chair to the right in the back row, but for now, I am planning on four Berkline 187 recliners. In leather.

Lobby
Concession snack counter. Eight ounce popcorn machine. Fridge. Beer tap. The usual.

Electrical
Two dedicated 20 amp circuits to power the electronics. The projector will be powerbridged from a UPS. The subwoofers will be powerbridged from a surge protector of some sort. The concessions will have a dedicated 20 amp circuit for the fridge and popcorm machine, and whatever neon lighting I might use there. The theater lighting will be controlled by a Grafik Eye 3106 wired into the existing house circuit in the bonus room.

Lighting
Six circuits on the Grafik Eye

1. Fiber Optic Star Ceiling
2. Rope Lights in Ceiling Light Tray
3. Sconces on Side Walls Near Screen
4. Wash Lights on Side Walls
5. Stage Down Lights / Screen Wash Lights
6. Riser/Stair Rope Lights

A single scene push button will set the entry scene from outside the front door.

Soundproofing
Green Glue with Double Drywall. Green Glue with Double OSB on the floor. I am probably making a big mistake not using hat channel, or ripping out the existing drywall. But when I am all done, I can tell myself "I told you so." But I will seal all wall penetrations and drywall seams with acoustical caulk. I will make a return air plenum with rigid fiberglass duct board, and I will make a custom MDF door with an automatic door bottom and soundproof seals in the jamb.

Acoustical Treatments
I am going to cover the front and rear walls with 2" Fiberglass (OC703). I am going to make panels with Linacoustic and Poly Batting for the side walls. The sloped ceiling will be untreated, but wallpapered with textured Anaglypta wallpaper. The ceiling will be untreated for the most part, just fabric over Homosote panels. Maybe treat the reflection points.

And with that, It is time to tell my story ...

It appears my hypocrisy knows no bounds.

Brian
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post #2 of 217 Old 02-13-2008, 03:38 PM - Thread Starter
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If it were February 2007, I might have said something like, “It is now time for me to lay hands on my theater building tools and begin to construct The Cinema Rouge.”

The fact of the matter is that I did start in February 2007. I am embarrassed to say that the theater was not a priority. The new house needed a deck, so I knew the spring, summer, and fall were going to be devoted to a massive Husband & Wife undertaking in the back yard. The deck would be a cash drain and a time-resource drain, but it needed to be finished first, just so we could unlock the kitchen slider and step outside. If this were a deck building forum, I’d tell you about how difficult it is to build a deck 12 feet off the ground, how heavy Ipe really is, and how anxious I am for the snow to stop so I can finish the railings. But I won’t. I'll just offer a picture or two of the nearly-complete monstrosity the two of us built this past summer as an example of what types of projects I will let delay my home theater ...





And then there is grad school. I started an accelerated MBA program in July. So whatever time was not devoted to deck building was devoted to school work. The program finishes in November of this year, so I still have a lot of studying and class attending to do. But I am much more accustomed to the schedule now, and I have figured out how to work my life into the routine.

Yet somehow, last February, even knowing the personal challenges I would face in the coming year, I got the bug to start the theater while I waited for the ground to thaw. (Wanna hear about digging 48” deep holes for the deck posts?) Rather than have people who might be interested in my theater build wonder just how slowly I can make progress on a single project, I thought I would just save up and start my thread a little later. Truth be told – the room doesn’t look a whole lot different.

I have been hiding here on the AVS forum, learning a lot about acoustics and aesthetics, laughing at the little arguments that spawn here and there, and asking an occasional question. I have been acquiring materials along the way. And I have gotten a pretty good jump on the soundproofing aspect of the room. I think if I start my thread now, people won’t be too disappointed … This won’t be the quickest build. But I hope it is not the slowest.

Plus maybe there will be a pointer here and there that I can take advantage of …

It appears my hypocrisy knows no bounds.

Brian
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post #3 of 217 Old 02-13-2008, 03:43 PM - Thread Starter
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On the coldest day of the year, the theater arrived. Well, some of it did. Drywall, OSB, studs. It is minus 4 degrees as the Home Depot truck arrives …


It appears my hypocrisy knows no bounds.

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post #4 of 217 Old 02-13-2008, 07:38 PM - Thread Starter
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Yes, this is a bonus room above the garage. The room is 13 feet wide. The knee walls are 64 inches high on both sides. The "middle" of the ceiling (the part that is parallel to the floor) is 94 inches wide. I am putting in a new rear wall to make the theater room 21'6" long.

It appears my hypocrisy knows no bounds.

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post #5 of 217 Old 02-14-2008, 08:36 AM - Thread Starter
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The first thing to do was to eliminate the window. I sealed the window itself with silicone caulk, so that bugs and weather couldn't get in from the outside. Then I took a piece of 3/16" hardboard and spray painted the "textured" side flat black. After a sufficient number of coats of paint, I boarded up the window.





Now, from the outside of the house, it just looks like a dark room.

Then I caulked the seam from the inside, just to completely seal off the window cavity. I don't want to ever have to get in there to clean it, or take cobwebs out of it.



At this point, though, it is still just a large acoustical hole in the wall. After some green glue and drywall on the sides of the window, I framed it out for a new wall in front of the window. Here I have also removed the existing drywall behind the frame, in order to avoid a triple leaf for those portions of the wall.


It appears my hypocrisy knows no bounds.

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post #6 of 217 Old 02-14-2008, 08:45 AM - Thread Starter
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I removed the existing insulation.



Then I repacked the cavity with fluffy pink batts.



Because there weren't enough tripping hazards in the room, I had my two helpers lay right in front of the wall I was working on.



Then I put the yellow batts back in the wall and sealed it up.




It appears my hypocrisy knows no bounds.

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post #7 of 217 Old 02-14-2008, 08:55 AM
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Looks like a fun project. Pretty dogs too!

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post #8 of 217 Old 02-14-2008, 08:55 AM - Thread Starter
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I caulked the seams with OSI SC-175 acoustical caulk.



I extended the electrical outlets through the double drywall.



The outlets on the side walls will be in the columns, so I can keep noise from the penetration down. Plus, the other side of the knee walls are exposed in a crawl space that I have access to through a scuttle in the garage. I am going to seal and insulate the metal box from the other side to further eliminate noise from coming through the outlet.

Then I taped the joints.



and had my lovely helper apply the rest of the mud to the seams and screws.


It appears my hypocrisy knows no bounds.

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post #9 of 217 Old 02-15-2008, 09:33 PM
 
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Lovely pair of German Sheppard's, by the way the sidewall or the 45° angle looks like a nice experiment for flush mounted side surrounds and yes use a few to cover the seating area in fact the word I'm looking for is uniform coverage over the seating area.

Fit the centre back against the vertical, you could also going back to the sidewalls fit additional ones fitted vertically so that way you'll have an awesome wrap around surround, its not about loudness its about being surrounded, with the right Dolby mix.

Noticed the hardhat is that for when the wife throws a Benny, at you and you need to duck and cover. No seriously most accidents happening in the home than anywhere else.
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post #10 of 217 Old 02-16-2008, 07:41 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cathan View Post

Pretty dogs too!

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Lovely pair of German Sheppard's,

Thanks! Hans and Roxy. Hans is in the foreground. He is 3-1/2 now. Roxy will be 2 next month. They are great to have around.

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by the way the sidewall or the 45° angle looks like a nice experiment for flush mounted side surrounds and yes use a few to cover the seating area in fact the word I'm looking for is uniform coverage over the seating area.

The "corner" between the side wall and the angled ceiling is 64" up. I figure that will be high enough to place the surrounds so that they are still above the listeners' heads - at least for the front row. The way I have the columns worked out in the room, the side surrounds will be right at 107 degrees for the front row (17 degrees behind the listener). They will still be in front of the second row, though. I'm not opposed to putting in more speakers for the back row - I was just thinking that a second pair of speakers might not fit in the 24 inches of side wall that will still be behind the back row. I guess I could put them directly to the side (90 degrees to the listener). That way there is still more surround for the back row, and their surround effects wouldn't be coming from 33 degrees in front of them. Even six inches behind them puts the speakers at 95 degrees. Maybe that's what I'll do.

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Noticed the hardhat is that for when the wife throws a Benny, at you and you need to duck and cover. No seriously most accidents happening in the home than anywhere else.

We actually had a mishap in the theater early on. My wife is less proficient with the drywall gun than I am, so she won't hang any of the drywall (her own choice). Unfortunately (for her) that means she is relegated to "helper." My wife is not as tall or as strong as I am, though, so her arms give out quickly, especially when holding sheets of drywall over her head. We used a drywall jack for the full sheets, but the half sheet we were putting up right in front of the window seemed light enough to manage. She held it up and I screwed it in. Well, after I got a screw in each corner to "position" the drywall - and before I got any more screws in to "fasten" the drywall - she decided to give her arms a rest. And the drywall she was holding over her head quickly landed on it. (Ouch)

It appears my hypocrisy knows no bounds.

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post #11 of 217 Old 02-25-2008, 10:11 AM - Thread Starter
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After the front wall was completed and blessed by the building inspector, we set out to soundproof the rest of the room. We removed three of the four overhead light fixtures. The first one in the chain of lights actually falls outside of where the rear wall of the theater will be built, so we left it in the lobby area. It was fortunate the way the lights were run in the room - a straight line from the rear of the theater to the front of the theater. We were able to disconnect the chain at the first light fixture quite easily. The remaining light fixtures were removed and the wire was cut out. I plugged the holes, caulked the seams, and drywalled it up.



I decided that 21'-6 made for a nice theater depth for this room, while leaving ample space for a lobby and a small workspace / room outside of the theater. Thus, I partitioned the room accordingly. Since the new rear wall would directly separate the theater from rest of the house, I chose a staggered stud configuration. (There is a roof above the theater, an external wall behind the head wall, a garage beneath the floor, and attic space beneath the eaves behind the side walls, so the rear wall is the only wall between the theater and the house.)

I turned one stud 90 degrees where I anticipate a future wall being attached to create the workspace / room described above.




It appears my hypocrisy knows no bounds.

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post #12 of 217 Old 02-25-2008, 10:28 AM - Thread Starter
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We drywalled the rear wall and caulked the seams using more OSI SC-175.





So, then, standing in the room, we can begin to see the shape of the room. Here is the front wall:



And the rear wall:



And no, I don't ask the dogs to be in every photo. Somehow they just know I am taking pictures and want to be in them. Especially Hans. He is such a ham. He loves to hang out with me because we are usually doing fun stuff like making piles of sawdust to roll around in. I think Roxy just follows him.

The threshold for the theater door is raised up 5.5 inches on purpose. Because of the sloping ceilings on the sides, I am really pressed for space. The rear seats will be up on a riser, but I won't have as much room as I'd like for a step without it being right in front of one of the chairs. So the step will actually be at the theater door. The door will swing into the theater and you will step up to enter the room. I was unsure about that - stepping up into the room - until I realized that was exactly how the front door of the house is.

So, when you enter the theater, you will be up on a 5-1/2 inch "riser." As you walk toward the screen, you can either step up another 5-1/2 inches to walk in front of the rear seats, or you can step back down to the floor level of the front seats. If you look closely on the floor in front of Hans' left front paw there is a piece of aluminum tape on the floor. That is about where the back of the front seats will be, so the step up to the second row will be about where his butt is. It seemed to make the most of the available floor space, since my entry door had to be where it is.

As you can see, I have to modify the door itself just to get it to fit under the slope. Unless they make a door shaped like that ...

It appears my hypocrisy knows no bounds.

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post #13 of 217 Old 02-25-2008, 10:41 AM - Thread Starter
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You'd have to see my house to believe me, but I don't think construction was my house builder's strong suit. We find new stuff to laugh about every week. For example, if you look way back, at the photo of the empty room with the window at the end, and look at the foreground on the left wall, you will see it is wavy. That's not the baseboard pulling away They set one of the roof trusses in the wrong spot - about 1-1/2 inches off. They decided to drywall it any. So the left side bulges into the room, and right side bulges out of the room. I can't wait to try to make a straight wall with my acoustical panels

Anyway, I can only imagine what the original drywall seams look like at those 45-degree corners. I would venture a guess that there is not a whole lot of sheetrock behind them. It is probably a poorly-fitting butt joint with tape and mud bridging the gap. Truth be told - my joints weren't much better. I put caulk where I could, but I wanted something more, so I invested in a little lead tape.



I ran the lead tape down the tricky seams just to try to seal off some more noise. Plus, at the base of the original wall, I know there was about a 1-inch gap between the drywall and the floor. I saw it when I removed the carpet and the baseboard. My second layer of drywall and OSB come about ¼-inch from each other, and I caulked my own seam, but I still wanted some more isolation there, so I ran lead along the long floor seams, too.

We covered the lead tape with some self-adhesive fiberglass joint tape, and will mud it in with the rest of the seams.



Now I am even protected if my neighbor decides to start experimenting with nuclear devices

It appears my hypocrisy knows no bounds.

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post #14 of 217 Old 02-25-2008, 11:44 AM
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I don't have a good feeling about drywall compound sticking to that "lead" tape.

That's something I've never seen.
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post #15 of 217 Old 02-25-2008, 11:58 AM - Thread Starter
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I'll let you know tomorrow ...

I figured it would be similar to the metal/mesh drywall patches you can buy. They look like an 8" square of aluminum flashing covered with a fiberglass mesh. I was thinking my lead tape covered with fiberglass mesh tape would be similar. If I have difficulty getting it to set, I'll have to try something else. Or maybe try nothing else ... the corners will be hidden behind light trays / soffits. I figure it's worth a shot, if just for the learning experience.

It appears my hypocrisy knows no bounds.

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post #16 of 217 Old 02-25-2008, 02:14 PM
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I don't have a good feeling about drywall compound sticking to that "lead" tape.

That's something I've never seen.

I agree with BIGmouthinDC. Tomorrow for sure it will dry. But the concern is in the future. I have a feeling that it might crack as well since it won't stick to it properly. I might be wrong. I'm just guessing because the surface is smooth and non-porous.
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post #17 of 217 Old 02-25-2008, 05:27 PM - Thread Starter
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Hmm ... well, time will tell. The lead is only 2" wide, so it is 1 inch on each side of the joint. Each side of the tape is covered with a 2" piece of mesh tape, so it overlaps the lead by an inch. I am pretty confident that the tape isn't going to come off the wall, and that if it decides to crack, it will only be an aesthetic issue that I won't see anyway.

I hope the rest of the theater is more enjoyable to build. I love woodworking - my real hobby. I hate drywall.

It appears my hypocrisy knows no bounds.

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post #18 of 217 Old 02-27-2008, 08:24 AM - Thread Starter
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The verdict ... a partial success.

We had covered the lead tape with two strips of self-adhesive fiberglass mesh tape. We had approached the task trying to plaster down the edges of the lead tape, so we weren't too concerned about overlapping the mesh tape in the middle. For about 80% of the seams, the fiberglass mesh overlapped in the middle of the lead tape, providing a continuous surface for the drywall compound to adhere to. For the other 20%, there was a small (up to 1/4") gap in the fiberglass mesh in the crotch of the angled joint.

As you surmised, the drywall compound did not adhere to the lead tape. Surprisingly, though, the compound formed a very strong bond to the fiberglass which was adhered to the lead tape. In prepping for future layers of compound, we scraped the first layer with a compound knife. I also pushed, prodded, scraped, and rapped with my knuckles the taped joints, and could not get the compound to come loose - except for those 1/4" strips deep in the joint for that 20% where the fiberglass was not attached.

It was an interesting exercise, for sure. In hind sight, I should have put up the lead before I put my DD&GG over the original wall. I hadn't seen the product until a few weeks ago, though.

Oh, well. Now I just have to decide what to do with the parts where the lead shows through. Maybe nothing, since it will be hidden anyway ...

It appears my hypocrisy knows no bounds.

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post #19 of 217 Old 03-09-2008, 06:52 PM - Thread Starter
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We have been out auditioning speakers. One of the reasons I wanted to determine the speakers I will use for the theater so early is so that I can make some design decisions for the columns and the screen placement.

After many weekends of driving around and listening, we have decided that Paradigm Studios are the best choice for our listening needs. They provide the dialogue clarity that my wife needs, will also providing sufficient impact and depth for my listening pleasure.

Here's the problem ...

When I sit in a Berkline 187, my ears are at about 45 inches (until I recline a little bit). So, I'd put the tweeters in my speakers at about 45 inches, too. The Studio 100s are 45 inches tall - perfect. But if I put them on my stage, the tweeters will be at 50 inches.

One thing I am thinking about is setting the speaker on the floor and building the stage around it. The speakers will be behind a false wall, behind speaker grill cloth. I could build the stage across the front of the room and set the false wall on top of it, but then - where you can't see it - end the stage so that the speaker can sit on the floor. Or frame out a "hole" in the stage so that the speaker sits down on the floor, in the middle of the stage.

So my question is, should I:
a.) Frame out a hole in the stage and set the speaker on the floor
b.) Put the speaker on the stage and don't worry about the height
c.) Choose a shorter speaker

Thanks!

It appears my hypocrisy knows no bounds.

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post #20 of 217 Old 03-10-2008, 01:35 PM - Thread Starter
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Or, I guess

(d) Buy a taller chair.

It appears my hypocrisy knows no bounds.

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post #21 of 217 Old 03-10-2008, 05:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sands_at_Pier147 View Post

We have been out auditioning speakers. One of the reasons I wanted to determine the speakers I will use for the theater so early is so that I can make some design decisions for the columns and the screen placement.

After many weekends of driving around and listening, we have decided that Paradigm Studios are the best choice for our listening needs. They provide the dialogue clarity that my wife needs, will also providing sufficient impact and depth for my listening pleasure.

Here's the problem ...

When I sit in a Berkline 187, my ears are at about 45 inches (until I recline a little bit). So, I'd put the tweeters in my speakers at about 45 inches, too. The Studio 100s are 45 inches tall - perfect. But if I put them on my stage, the tweeters will be at 50 inches.

One thing I am thinking about is setting the speaker on the floor and building the stage around it. The speakers will be behind a false wall, behind speaker grill cloth. I could build the stage across the front of the room and set the false wall on top of it, but then - where you can't see it - end the stage so that the speaker can sit on the floor. Or frame out a "hole" in the stage so that the speaker sits down on the floor, in the middle of the stage.

So my question is, should I:
a.) Frame out a hole in the stage and set the speaker on the floor
b.) Put the speaker on the stage and don't worry about the height
c.) Choose a shorter speaker

Thanks!

Are the speakers full sized towers? And are you planning on using a dedicated sub? If so, then just get monitor/bookcase speakers. You will end up cutting off the bass in the towers away for movie listening. With bookcase speakers you'll get the height right.

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post #22 of 217 Old 03-10-2008, 07:59 PM - Thread Starter
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Yes, the ones we like are full size towers. There will be two subs in the room, too (7.2). Just this afternoon I was looking into how AVRs use a low pass filter for the subs, and the lowest setting is 80 Hz. So maybe smaller speakers are more appropriate ... Something in me tells me I shouldn't look at smaller speakers, but part of me knows it is the right decision.

I have actually heard several people mention they prefer smaller bookshelf speakers for the theater, because the imaging is more precise. I'll have to find someone who has the Studio 40s for me to audition.

It appears my hypocrisy knows no bounds.

Brian
The Cinema Rouge Home Theater
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post #23 of 217 Old 03-11-2008, 07:00 AM
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Well with subs the room you won't be using 1/2 of what you are paying for with tower speakers. If it was a dedicated music room, then the equation is different. BPape talked me out of the tower speaker when I was working on speaker selection for that very reason.

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post #24 of 217 Old 03-11-2008, 12:55 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cathan View Post

Well with subs the room you won't be using 1/2 of what you are paying for with tower speakers. If it was a dedicated music room, then the equation is different. BPape talked me out of the tower speaker when I was working on speaker selection for that very reason.

Thank you very much for the feedback. I've been so torn about towers versus bookshelves, I'm not sure what will give me what I need. I have auditioned speakers, but I always find that the towers sound so much better (of course) in the listening environment at the shops. I really appreciate the "real world" feedback that a dedicated theater environment won't necessarily benefit from the larger towers.

It appears my hypocrisy knows no bounds.

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The Cinema Rouge Home Theater
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post #25 of 217 Old 03-12-2008, 01:08 PM - Thread Starter
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I'm wondering if anyone has an opinon about HVAC returns. Here's another bright idea I have come up with ...

The original room had five supply registers in the floor, and one large return grill on the back wall. When I built the new partition wall for the back of the theater, I effectively isolated the return air from the theater. Now there are three supply registers in the theater, with no way for the air to escape.

I am going to use some fiberglass duct board to built a square plenum inside the theater, on the new back wall. I was going to cut a hole in the back wall and pass the fiberglass duct through the wall, into the space outside of the theater. With a few right turns in the air flow path, and some caulk around the penetration, I figure it will be as sound proof as I can make it. Then I would finish the return air penetration with a grill, directly opposite the room (~7 feet) from the existing return air duct in the wall.

The premise here is that "new" air will be forced into the theater through the supply registers, creating a positive pressure in the theater and forcing "old" air out the fiberglass plenum and out of the theater. The air would then find its way into the existing return air duct and back to the furnace.

Will that be sufficient to move air through the theater? Or do I need to run a duct / plenum from the theater exit grill to the existing return grill? I know the furnace forces air into the house, but does the return air also draw a vacuum? Or is the return air passive?

It appears my hypocrisy knows no bounds.

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post #26 of 217 Old 03-12-2008, 01:20 PM
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The return air draws air from the space and is not a passive system. You should have no problems with system as you described it.

Good luck with the rest of the build!

Chris

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post #27 of 217 Old 03-12-2008, 01:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sands_at_Pier147 View Post

Thank you very much for the feedback. I've been so torn about towers versus bookshelves, I'm not sure what will give me what I need. I have auditioned speakers, but I always find that the towers sound so much better (of course) in the listening environment at the shops. I really appreciate the "real world" feedback that a dedicated theater environment won't necessarily benefit from the larger towers.

Trust me, I was right there with you. Yes, one their own, towers will sound better when compared with bookcase speakers on your own. For true side by side have them cut off the towers at 80 hz.

As for the HVAC concerns, I know getting the balance right will make all of the difference between whether your room will be comfortable or not. You may need to add a fan on the return to get the pressure right. A floor return won't help you get rid of heat though. You'll need a return higher up the wall or in the ceiling.

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post #28 of 217 Old 03-12-2008, 02:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cathan View Post

As for the HVAC concerns, I know getting the balance right will make all of the difference between whether your room will be comfortable or not. You may need to add a fan on the return to get the pressure right. A floor return won't help you get rid of heat though. You'll need a return higher up the wall or in the ceiling.

Was going to suggest same thing - an inline fan on the return to help pull air from room.

Cheers,
Mark

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post #29 of 217 Old 07-06-2008, 11:46 AM
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Do you have any more progress pictures? I have a room very similar to yours and i'm curious to see what your going to work on next and the final project.
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post #30 of 217 Old 07-06-2008, 12:36 PM
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Very nice progress. I have a bonus room above the garage that I've also converted to a theater, although mine is temporary until I finish the basement as the room is only 9 x 12 (very cozy!).
Is Rouge referring to the color it will be or is that your name?
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