Just bought Samsung UN40D6420UFXZA, scary warning about burn-in - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 9 Old 07-03-2011, 03:33 PM - Thread Starter
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Forgive me if this is the wrong place for this but since it is about a 3D tv I thought I should post it here. I just bought a new 2011 model Samsung LED LCD 40" hdtv, and the first thing I did is sit down with the manual and start reading. The entire first page is basically a warning that watching 4:3 content or other still images can and will cause burn-in. Here is the entire text from page 1:

"Widescreen format LED displays (with 16:9 aspect ratios, the ratio of the screen width-to-height) are primarily designed to view widescreen format full-motion video. The images displayed on them should primarily be in the widescreen 16:9 ratio format, or expanded to fill the screen if your model offers this feature with the images constantly in motion. Displaying stationary graphics and images on the screen, such as the dark sidebars on non-expanded standard-format television video and programming, should be limited to no more than 5% of the total television viewing per week.

Additionally, viewing other stationary images and text such as stock market crawls, video game displays, station logos, websites or computer graphics and patterns, should be limited as described above for all televisions. Displaying stationary images for more than 5% of total viewing time can cause uneven aging of your LED display and leave subtle, but permanent burn-in ghost images in the LED picture. To avoid this, vary the programming and images, and primarily display full-screen moving images, not stationary patterns or dark bars. On LED models that offer picture sizing features, use these controls to view different formats as a full-screen picture.

Be careful about the television formats you select and the length of time you view them. Uneven LED aging as a result of format selection and use, as well as burned-in images, are not covered by your Samsung limited warranty.
"


Are you kidding me?? So I just spent over a thousand dollars for what I thought was a great new 3D tv set and they're telling me I can't even watch old tv shows on it? There's no way I'm going to stretch the 4:3 image to fill the screen - that's ridiculous, and I want to watch my shows in the aspect ratio they were filmed in - 4:3, 16:9, whatever.

Can somebody please elaborate on how much of a problem this really is for this type of set? I have a pretty large collection of DVDs of older 4:3 tv shows, and I watch them often. I was also looking forward to connecting my pc to this set so I could stream various video formats to it, and even play some pc games as well. Now that I've read this, I'm about ready to pack it back up and return it before I even set it up and try it out.

Is this a real problem? Are they seriously telling me only 5% of my content can be 4:3? And how do I avoid channels with logos? This sounds absolutely ridiculous to me and I'm very concerned about this. I do not have the kind of money to buy another set in a year or less if this one gets burn-in, and it sounds like Samsung have washed their hands of any liability. How do they sell a tv and then tell you afterwards that you can't watch 4:3 programming on it? I didn't think burn-in was a problem with LCD sets. Is this only with LED LCD sets?

Please help me understand how much of an issue this is going to be for me, given that I watch lots of 4:3 material. It seems like a great set, but what good is it if I can't watch my shows?

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post #2 of 9 Old 07-03-2011, 04:10 PM
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In my humble opinion LCD TVs are not subject to burn in. I've used LCD TVs for computer input since they were available. I currently use my Samsung un55c8000 with a computer. I have parties for long hours with a stationary Image and music playing. Everything I've read states that an LCD advantage over plasma is that this isn't a problem. I think Samsung and other Manuf. use the same warning for LCD and plasma to cover their butt, they just change plasma to LED (which is a LCD TV). Even plasma has made great strides to eliminate this problem. Don't worry at all.
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post #3 of 9 Old 07-03-2011, 04:11 PM
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I wouldn't worry about it; that is CYA language that every vendor includes in their manuals. If you had a plasma TV you'd have to be a more careful about your viewing habits but with an LCD, occurrence of burn-in and image retention is next to impossible and you should be able to view all the letterbox movies and play all the games you want.

If you do start to see some IR it is far more likely that there is a problem with the panel itself; as a general rule, LCD technology is about as safe as you can get.
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post #4 of 9 Old 07-03-2011, 04:19 PM - Thread Starter
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Thanks for the replies. That's a pretty stern warning from Samsung if it's not really an issue. Why would they have all that on page 1 and risk getting their sets returned by concerned customers if it really isn't a problem anyways? I was just looking at a Vizio pdf manual for one of their 42" LED backlit LCD 3D tvs, and nowhere in the entire manual does it mention anything about burn-in and limiting your 4:3 viewing in any way. This leaves me to wonder if Samsungs may be especially prone to this problem? Or, at least if it happens to a Vizio set, the warranty isn't voided. That's the part that scares me the most - Samsung specifically says they are not liable for burn-in.

Why would Samsung have their entire first page warning you about this and Vizio doesn't even mention it in their manual? They are both the same technology so wouldn't they both have the same problems with burn-in, if it is indeed a problem? And why be so specific about it - it doesn't just say to be careful, it mentions 5% several times.

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post #5 of 9 Old 07-03-2011, 04:26 PM
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I will almost guaranty Samsung and Vizio are the same in this respect. CYA is right.
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post #6 of 9 Old 07-03-2011, 07:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eagle_2 View Post

Thanks for the replies. That's a pretty stern warning from Samsung if it's not really an issue. Why would they have all that on page 1 and risk getting their sets returned by concerned customers if it really isn't a problem anyways? I was just looking at a Vizio pdf manual for one of their 42" LED backlit LCD 3D tvs, and nowhere in the entire manual does it mention anything about burn-in and limiting your 4:3 viewing in any way. This leaves me to wonder if Samsungs may be especially prone to this problem? Or, at least if it happens to a Vizio set, the warranty isn't voided. That's the part that scares me the most - Samsung specifically says they are not liable for burn-in.

Why would Samsung have their entire first page warning you about this and Vizio doesn't even mention it in their manual? They are both the same technology so wouldn't they both have the same problems with burn-in, if it is indeed a problem? And why be so specific about it - it doesn't just say to be careful, it mentions 5% several times.

I believe it is just a simple case of Samsung recycling the disclaimer language across all their manuals. Sony also did the same thing and I remember my XBR2 manual havimg a similar disclaimer. Try looking up a different Samsung manual online and I'll bet you'll see the same language.
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post #7 of 9 Old 02-12-2012, 09:50 PM
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i bought the same TV on Sept 2011 and on Feb6 it stopped working. All you can see on the screen is light thumb like sign and a white line at the bottom of the screen. Samsung came took a picture and gave their verdict right away that there is "physical damage". interesting there is not the least scratch on the screen and the area where they blame for physical damage is glowing and rest of the whole screen is black. so far they are not willing to either replace or repair, but this is disgusting and pathetic that their product didnt last more than 5 months and on top of that the blame me and cashed the $1300.

i always watched 16:9 ratio though the programs i watched are all internet based transmission. i dont know whether this has got something to do with it?
can some ony help me and guide what if they still dont replace or repair is there any other forum where i can complain as this is absolutely unfair that despite there is no scartch on the screen but still they are blaming me that i have thrown either remote control on the screen or puchnced it. do they think that we are crazy or mad to save so much money and buy a tv and then start kicking and punching it. for me not only Samsung's product was so unreliable but ever worst is their customer service and after sales . please help and guide folks am really disgusted and disappointed from Samsung.
thanks
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post #8 of 9 Old 02-17-2012, 09:10 AM
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This thread seems quite relevant to my concern, with a small wrinkle. As new owner of LN40D630 (cold-cathode backlight, not LED), I've read the likely-CYA on p. 16 of the manual, specifically the warning under Menu > Picture > Picture Options > Size, advising not to watch for extended periods with Size set to 4:3.

My question: I don't plan to configure the TV to 4:3, but a substantial # of the channels we watch on FiOS, don't have HD counterparts (e.g., TCM, Fox movies, BBC World News). Is extended viewing of such channels (with resulting black vertical bars flanking the live image) just as "risky" as setting the display size explicitly to 4:3?

Thanks for your help!
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post #9 of 9 Old 02-17-2012, 12:28 PM
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Unless you watch absolutely nothing but 4/3 with black bars the likelihood of damaging the set is about the same as the likelihood of the world coming to an end due to a Zombie apocalypse.

From hanging around these forums it's obvious that 99% of people that buy new sets never look at the owner's manuals and the 1% that does gets scared witless over these silly CYA warnings.

Steve S.
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