Just bought a Yamaha YSP-2200 soundbar, questions about hooking up other devices... - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
Baselworld is only a few weeks away. Getting the latest news is easy, Click Here for info on how to join the Watchuseek.com newsletter list. Follow our team for updates featuring event coverage, new product unveilings, watch industry news & more!



Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
Old 12-11-2013, 11:19 AM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
phie's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 346
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked: 10
So the soundbar has a few HDMI ports, does that mean I can hook up other devices to it (e.g., computer, WDTV Live, etc) and it'll take advantage of the soundbar's sound? Or do I still need a receiver? I have a Denon 2310 that I'd like to sell if possible as I don't have the space for it. Is there any benefit to using a receiver with this soundbar?

Thanks!
phie is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 12-11-2013, 11:40 AM
AVS Special Member
 
taichi4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 2,653
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 282 Post(s)
Liked: 144
You don't need and shouldn't use a receiver with the YSP-2200 as it's a powered soundbar...as opposed to a passive soundbar...with its own built-in amplification. Just connect your sources directly to the unit.

You might want to hold on to the Denon until you're sure you like the sound of the Yamaha, however!
taichi4 is offline  
Old 12-11-2013, 04:25 PM
 
ttlnb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 440
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Liked: 49
After testing lots of stuff and trying to get ARC/CEC to work correctly I found my results were a crapshoot. I came to 3 conclusions:

1. ARC/CEC is evil.
2. ARC/CEC is possessed.
3. Friends don't let friends use ARC/CEC.

Seriously, you can spend hours on this stuff to realize it is a great idea on paper but poorly implemented among the various manufacturers. Connect the TV to the sound bar with an optical cable, turn off CEC on all devices, get a good universal remote.

It will be money and time well spent!
ttlnb is offline  
Old 12-11-2013, 05:09 PM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
phie's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 346
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Thanks both of you! So the Yamaha is powered, which means it's its own amp/receiver? And as long as it has the ports I need, I have no need for a dedicated AVR?

ttlnb: what is ARC and CEC? Why do you recommend connecting the TV and soundbar via optical cables? Why not HDMI?

I do have a Harmony universal remote that I like.

I am new to this if you can't tell!
phie is offline  
Old 12-11-2013, 08:29 PM
 
ttlnb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 440
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Liked: 49
ARC = audio return channel. If you connect devices to the TV or use the TV's sources like antenna or smart TV apps then it can send the sound back ti the sound bar or receiver through the HDMI. However, it does not always work correctly because depending on how HDMI syncs sometimes it only gets a stereo signal. Also, ARC does not send the lossless formats like True HD and Master DTS. To use ARC you have to turn on CEC. You are much better to connect all your components to the sound bar and then connect one HDMI to the TV from the sound bar. Even if your sound bar only has one HDMI out I wouldn't use ARC. I'd run an optical cable back the the sound bar instead of ARC. I guess that is why we see so many sound bars with optical inputs and no HDMI, they don't want to deal with the ARC/CEC headaches.

CEC = consumer electronic control. In theory it is supposed to switch all your inputs, control the volume, and turn off equipment not being used. So if you turn on your blu-ray player for instance the TV and sound bar would automatically switch to the correct inputs, the volume control on the remote no matter which one you use in the chain of components should control the sound bar or receivers volume and not the TV and then turn off the devices you are not using. It is supposed to figure out what is connected and turned on and make smart decisions for inputs, which device to use for the volume, etc. In reality it is a cruel joke, and you swear your devices are possessed. Things turn on/off that you don't want. The volume sometimes controls the TV, sometimes the sound bar, and which input it picks is done by a roulette wheel. I had problems with equipment from the same manufacturer, like Sony TV, Blu-ray and Sound bar. So turn CEC off which will also turn off ARC.

To confuse things CEC is called different things by different manufacturers. For Sony it is called Bravia sync, Panasonic is Viera link, Samsung is Any-net, LG is simplink, etc.

So for your system connect all your devices to the sound bar. For instance

cable/satellite box > YSP 2200 w/ HDMI
Computer > YSP 2200 w/ HDMI
WD Live > YSP 2000 w/ HDMI

YSP 2200 > TV w/ HDMI

If you plan to use the TVs internal source such as an antenna or its Apps then:
TV > YSP 2200 w/ optical instead of using ARC/CEC via the HDMI.

Use your Harmony, you'll be happy you did. If you try to connect all the devices to the TV and try to use ARC for sound, CEC will wreck havoc with the harmony. It's as ugly as the republican and democrats fighting for who has control:-)
ttlnb is offline  
Old 12-13-2013, 01:16 PM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
phie's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 346
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by ttlnb View Post

ARC = audio return channel. If you connect devices to the TV or use the TV's sources like antenna or smart TV apps then it can send the sound back ti the sound bar or receiver through the HDMI. However, it does not always work correctly because depending on how HDMI syncs sometimes it only gets a stereo signal. Also, ARC does not send the lossless formats like True HD and Master DTS. To use ARC you have to turn on CEC. You are much better to connect all your components to the sound bar and then connect one HDMI to the TV from the sound bar. Even if your sound bar only has one HDMI out I wouldn't use ARC. I'd run an optical cable back the the sound bar instead of ARC. I guess that is why we see so many sound bars with optical inputs and no HDMI, they don't want to deal with the ARC/CEC headaches.

CEC = consumer electronic control. In theory it is supposed to switch all your inputs, control the volume, and turn off equipment not being used. So if you turn on your blu-ray player for instance the TV and sound bar would automatically switch to the correct inputs, the volume control on the remote no matter which one you use in the chain of components should control the sound bar or receivers volume and not the TV and then turn off the devices you are not using. It is supposed to figure out what is connected and turned on and make smart decisions for inputs, which device to use for the volume, etc. In reality it is a cruel joke, and you swear your devices are possessed. Things turn on/off that you don't want. The volume sometimes controls the TV, sometimes the sound bar, and which input it picks is done by a roulette wheel. I had problems with equipment from the same manufacturer, like Sony TV, Blu-ray and Sound bar. So turn CEC off which will also turn off ARC.

To confuse things CEC is called different things by different manufacturers. For Sony it is called Bravia sync, Panasonic is Viera link, Samsung is Any-net, LG is simplink, etc.

So for your system connect all your devices to the sound bar. For instance

cable/satellite box > YSP 2200 w/ HDMI
Computer > YSP 2200 w/ HDMI
WD Live > YSP 2000 w/ HDMI

YSP 2200 > TV w/ HDMI

If you plan to use the TVs internal source such as an antenna or its Apps then:
TV > YSP 2200 w/ optical instead of using ARC/CEC via the HDMI.

Use your Harmony, you'll be happy you did. If you try to connect all the devices to the TV and try to use ARC for sound, CEC will wreck havoc with the harmony. It's as ugly as the republican and democrats fighting for who has control:-)

Thanks so much!! Yes, I forgot to mention my cable box. So yes, I just need to hook the YSP2200 up to the cable box, then the cable box goes to the TV all via HDMI? And then the HTPC and WD TV Live get hooked up via HDMI and I bypass CEC and ARC and I'm all good? Anything else I should know about the YSP 2200? Is the volume equalizer (so night time viewing is tamed) good? The Audyssey Dynamic Volume tech is awesome on my Denon!
phie is offline  
Old 12-13-2013, 01:42 PM
 
ttlnb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 440
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Liked: 49
The cable box and all your devices are connected to the YSP HDMI inputs. Then the YSP HDMI out is connected to an HDMI in on the TV. I'm not sure how well their adaptive volume works.
ttlnb is offline  
Old 12-13-2013, 01:49 PM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
phie's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 346
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Okay, thanks! Anything else I should know about the YSP 2200 to get the most out of it? How should I place the subwoofer?
phie is offline  
Old 12-13-2013, 04:18 PM
 
ttlnb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 440
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Liked: 49
Placing the sub is a loaded question and setting a sub properly is difficult without measurement equipment. Run the set up and see if it integrates well with the sound bar, not too boomy or lacking in bass. Try the sub in different locations and re-run the setup to see which area sounds best to you.
ttlnb is offline  
Old 12-28-2013, 08:22 AM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
phie's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 346
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked: 10
The soundbar is awesome, thanks!

What level do you recommend setting and leaving the subwoofer at?
phie is offline  
Old 01-06-2014, 02:36 AM
Newbie
 
Sandot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Just bought the ysp2200 and not sure if I should get the Dolry HiFi Stone or YBA-11 to stream my music. Can anyone please help?
Sandot is offline  
Old 07-31-2014, 08:01 PM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 0
I just wanted to know, how do you connect the soundbar to the desktop, just via hdmi cable to the graphic card hdmi slots? and it will work fine? i have a rampage iv black edition motherboard.

thanks for the help!!!
dragvinz is offline  
Old 08-01-2014, 05:40 AM
Newbie
 
no_nick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Well I got a Denon DHT S514 and after some research I found that the best way to hook my gear up is as shown in the pic below. Depending on how many sources you have you'll need a HDMI switch, like I do. If anyone has a better idea please share.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	soundbar.png
Views:	2511
Size:	20.8 KB
ID:	191274  

Last edited by no_nick; 08-01-2014 at 05:43 AM.
no_nick is offline  
Old 08-03-2014, 03:21 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Mattopotamus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 2,068
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1122 Post(s)
Liked: 790
Quote:
Originally Posted by no_nick View Post
Well I got a Denon DHT S514 and after some research I found that the best way to hook my gear up is as shown in the pic below. Depending on how many sources you have you'll need a HDMI switch, like I do. If anyone has a better idea please share.
Some newer TVs can actually pass 5.1 with the HDMI to optical route
Mattopotamus is offline  
Old 08-30-2015, 12:48 PM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
phie's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 346
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Are soundbars generally not recommended using in 2 channel or 2.1 channel mode? I was wondering if I could use this soubar hooked up to my computer for 2/2.1 channel listening, and the odd movie (don't care if the source is sound surround though). Or maybe I should just buy bookshelf speakers and an amp.
phie is offline  
Old 08-31-2015, 02:44 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 1,741
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 762 Post(s)
Liked: 336
For hooking up o your computer I would get a pair of active/powered speakers. I'm not sure your budget but the JBL LSR-305 monitor speakers are some of the best I have heard for $260 pair, you can add a sub if you want more bass.
Ellebob is offline  
Old 08-31-2015, 08:32 PM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
phie's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 346
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Thanks! I will check them out. I would like to spend less than $100. I have an old Sony 5.1 AVR I can use so it doesn't have to be powered. The monoprice bookshelf speakers have great reviews on most general tech sites and I always buy cables from them, but how do they rate with avsforum users? I am very open to buying used (I actually prefer it due to personal philosophical reasons). Any other recommendations for less expensive speakers on the used side? I assume since I have an amp and therefore can go with unpowered speakers, I can get a good deal on older speakers? I've heard good things about Energy? Besides CL and eBay where should I look for used? For the next month I'm in DC, then back to Manhattan. Thanks!
phie is offline  
Old 09-01-2015, 03:22 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 1,741
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 762 Post(s)
Liked: 336
If you already have the amp then CL and tag sales are probably your best bet but will take some time. Some options for new would be the Dayton B652 $35/pair you could even get a Dayton sub and be under $150. Other speaker options would be Dayton B652-AIR $60/pair, Pioneer Andrew Jones speakers SP-BS22LR $130/pair, BIC Venturi DV62si $120/pair, and Yamaha NS-6490 $130/pair.
Ellebob is offline  
Old 09-01-2015, 11:57 AM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
phie's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 346
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Thanks! I've never heard the term studio monitor, what is the difference between it and say the ascend sierra 1? are there downsides to them?

what about the eris e5 or e4.5? both seem to be well liked and about $180 used for the e5, puts it in the same ballpark as the JBLs.

The Dayton B652 for $35/pair would be awesome! How does it compare to the JBL's you mentioned or the eris e5? I see it is called a bookshelf speaker not a studio monitor. Why does it lack the studio monitor distinction? Is "studio monitor" itself a marketing term? $39 prime shipping is very tempting! And as for hooking it up to my old Sony AVR to my macbook pro, I shouldn't have any problems with that. Will I have to control volume thru the AVR or will I Be able to use the computer's volume control? Finally, what's the best way to hook the speakers to my computer, whether it is a powered speaker set or not? The tech specs list a "headphone port" and says under it: Support for audio line out (digital/analog). Again, I just want it to listen to music or general computer stuff,
I'm not expecting sound surround out of it...I have plex server running to watch media with sound surround on my TV with my YSP 2200.

Oh one other thing, I have started to learn to play the piano through a keyboard and obviously the keyboard has crappy sound. Can I use any of the speakers we are discussing above with my keyboard?

Thanks!
phie is offline  
Old 09-01-2015, 03:00 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 1,741
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 762 Post(s)
Liked: 336
Studio monitors are speakers like any other. They typically describe accurate speakers or to be used in a studio as compared to like a PA or concert speaker in the pro world. Marketing terms get thrown around all the time with no basis in fact. Whether they are studio monitors or just speakers there are 3 main types.


Active - These speakers plug into the wall and don't need and amplifier or receiver as it is built into the speaker. Inside the speaker is an electronic circuit for the crossover and separate amplifiers for each driver. In a two way speaker there will be an amplifier for the woofer and amplifier for the tweeter. These speakers because the circuitry is powered by AC power and not the amplifier the crossover can be a lot more precise especially if it uses digital signal processing. With a more precise crossover and each driver having its own amp they tend to be the most accurate and dynamic and that is why you see this type in most recording studios.


Passive- This is what most home speakers are. The amplifier/receiver that is connected to the speaker and it powers all the components of the speaker, the crossover circuitry, woofer, tweeter, etc. They are not as good as active speakers but are used for two reasons, cost and simplicity. You only have to get a pair of speaker wires to the speaker and their is no internal electronics or amps so they are cheaper to make. An active speaker you need to get AC power to each speaker as well as a cable to bring the audio signal to the speaker.


Powered - It's like a cross between a passive speaker and an active one. It use one amplifier and the crossover and drivers are powered by the amplifier. You will often seen these used as computer speakers so no separate amp or receiver is required but sometimes less expensive studio monitor and PA speakers use this design as well. Some people use the term active and powered interchangeably.


With that being said I would rather have a well designed passive speaker than a mediocre active speaker. A lot comes down to the design by if all components are equal I would use active speakers all the time.


The JBL LSR series is a big step up from any of the others I mentioned and I would probably give the Sierra 1 a run for the money. It is one area where spending twice as much gets a very good noticeable jump in performance. Unlike the high end where the law of diminishing return is more prevalent. The speakers I mentioned are decent for the price but they are the low end of the speaker market. The Pre-sonus E5 is in the same class as the JBL. The JBL with its waveguide will have better off axis response and probably a little more dynamic. You can probably have a listen to each at a music store and see which you prefer.


If connecting to your receiver from your laptop it would depend how you connect it. If you use the optical connection you would control the volume with the receiver. If you use the analog connection you would have two volume controls, the computer and the receiver.


If you connect to active/powered speakers you would use the analog connections and use computer for controlling the volume. You might need some adapter cable to fit the type of connection on the speakers. It depends which model you are considering.


You can use either set up for your keyboard if your keyboard has an audio output. Don't turn up the volume too loud on the keyboard if using the receiver, control the volume with the receiver.
Ellebob is offline  
Old 09-01-2015, 03:23 PM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
phie's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 346
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Thanks! So I am trying to decide between the e5 and the JBL 305 you mentioned. Do you have any idea how to decide between the two? Which one is the better speaker? The e5 is about $50 less.

Quote:
Don't turn up the volume too loud on the keyboard if using the receiver, control the volume with the receiver.
Why is that?
phie is offline  
Old 09-01-2015, 03:33 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 1,741
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 762 Post(s)
Liked: 336
Part of picking a speaker is how it interacts in your room and your personal preference. Personally, I haven't heard anything better than the JBLs in that price range but I haven't listened to them side by side or in a good environment for the Presonus.


Most keyboards are designed to be connected to pro equipment. Pro equipment takes a hotter signal so if the volume is too high on the keyboards it could overdrive the receiver. You can use it with the receiver and you will be able to play pretty loud. just adjust the volume from the receiver and don't feed the signal too hot from the keyboards. Most active speakers either have multiple connections for balanced or unbalanced inputs or they have a sensitivity adjustment to account for the differences between pro and consumer equipment.
Ellebob is offline  
Old 09-04-2015, 02:10 PM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
phie's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 346
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Thanks! I'll do some more research, I rather spend less if possible. I'll be on the lookout on the NYC craigslist for the JBLs, right now the cheapest I've seen is $190 including shipping for a pair. Let's see if I can get it for less.
phie is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
 

Tags
Yamaha Ysp 2200 Digital Sound Projector Black
Thread Tools


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off