Is 3D about dead? - Page 32 - AVS Forum
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post #931 of 934 Old Today, 07:22 PM
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With 3D passive (2K); do you have to sit eye-level (horizontally and vertically) with the display, and also not too close to the screen as to not see the artifacts? ...Vertical banding (black vertical moving bars), or whatever it is called.

And like you already mentioned, sharpness (@ half the resolution per eye).
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post #932 of 934 Old Today, 08:43 PM
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Originally Posted by NorthSky View Post
With 3D passive (2K); do you have to sit eye-level (horizontally and vertically) with the display, and also not too close to the screen as to not see the artifacts? ...Vertical banding (black vertical moving bars), or whatever it is called.
Passive 3D at a public cinema uses different technology that does not produce the artefacts produced by Film-type Patterned Retarder passive home displays.

Passive 3D on a home display if the display is only Full HD will involve a Film-type Patterned Retarder (FPR) that halves the number of vertical pixels that are visible for each eye. At reasonably close viewing distances you perceive a fine pattern of black horizontal lines, like Venetian blinds; and there are aliasing effects, e.g. a diagonal line can appear to have small jagged steps. I find that even at a greater viewing distance I perceive aliasing even if I can no longer see the individual black horizontal lines. If you are a reasonably non-critical viewer, 3D with a passive Full HD is not too bad. It is bright, and it doesn't flicker. Some people report finding it less tiring to watch than 120Hz active glasses technology.

The vertical viewing angle is very critical. You get minimal ghosting if you are at the correct vertical viewing angle and horrible ghosting if you stray too much from that angle. The horizontal angle is not particularly important as regards ghosting but may affect the picture quality in other ways (LCD displays). Passive can be a particular benefit in Europe and Australia with a 50Hz television frame rate as active glasses usually operate at only 100Hz with a 50Hz picture, which can lead to noticeable miraging for a certain percentage of viewers (such as me!).

A 4k passive panel is currently a very good solution* for viewing Full HD 3D if viewers are prepared to view at the optimum vertical viewing angle. With my 65" Sony 4k LCD TV I do not notice aliasing or black lines unless I get extremely close to the screen. Ghosting is low (though not as good as with DLP projectors and active glasses), and there is no timing discrepancy between displaying the Left and Right views.

_________

* I am assuming the passive 4K TV uses a fine pitch for the film-type patterned retarder resulting in 1080 horizontal lines for Left and interspersed 1080 horizontal lines for Right. (An exception is the 2013 model 55" Sony 4K set which uses a coarser FPR pitch.)

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post #933 of 934 Old Today, 09:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthSky View Post
With 3D passive (2K); do you have to sit eye-level (horizontally and vertically) with the display, and also not too close to the screen as to not see the artifacts? ...Vertical banding (black vertical moving bars), or whatever it is called.

And like you already mentioned, sharpness (@ half the resolution per eye).
Passive 3D sets are quite sensitive to vertical viewing angles, so you definitely don't want to be mounting one above a fireplace if you intend on watching 3D movies. I can readily see a difference seated vs. standing up on my particular set, for example (8.5' viewing distance from 70" display). Horizontal viewing angles are a little more forgiving. As for the vertical scan lines, I can't directly see them from my viewing distance, but I notice the effects of the halved resolution i.e. jagged lines, and some fine detail is lost. It's really not that bad, and is only readily apparent in certain scenes. Despite the limitations, I absolutely love watching 3D content at home. If the advancement of the technology and drop in price continues, I expect my next TV will be a 4k, passive 3D OLED set in the 70-80" range.
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post #934 of 934 Old Today, 09:09 PM
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Originally Posted by andy sullivan View Post
But what about the active glasses? I love 3d and own over 20 movies. I wear glasses so I must put the active 3d glasses over my regular glasses. They are heavy enough to start hurting my nose within 15 minutes. It won't stop me from watching 3d movies but I can see where it would be a serious turn off for some.
My situation is similar to yours with the exception that my active Panasonic glasses don't bother me at all. Here in Florida, it quite common to have those larger sunglasses that fit right over your regular glasses, especially if you're frequently going from inside lighting to bright outdoor sun. It's just convenience.

My take on the over-amplified dislike of 3D is that some folks find the realism & experience just too different from what they've always known. Freaks'em out.
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