Convince me to go Projector Instead of Plasma. All the hassle aghhhh - Page 2 - AVS Forum
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post #31 of 38 Old 04-21-2014, 05:59 PM
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I think the biggest "hook" for projection is actually trying it in your home. That is what sold me.

I was headed for a 65" plasma, being a massive plasma fan and loving my 42" Panny plasma. But having seen projection in some stores, and in a couple friend's places, I was musing about
that option too knowing it would be pretty cool. It wasn't until I borrowed my friend's projector to actually test for seating distances for a 65" plasma that it really happened. I'd zoomed the image to
65" diagonal, and found I'd have to move the furniture pretty close (somewhat awkwardly in the room) to get the immersion I seemed to be craving. So then I just tried zooming the image big
on the wall and...OMG! Cinema! In My Home! It was just effortless immersion and a whole different experience. There is something that clicks when you realize, in your own room, sitting on your
own comfy couch where you've never seen anything there but a flat screen...that you could actually have THIS (projected cinema-like impact) in your own home.

It's been 4 years since I got my first projector and it's still as thrilling to me every day as when I first experienced it. I feel like pinching myself all the time when watching it. (Especially as projection image quality just
keeps getting better and better).
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post #32 of 38 Old 04-21-2014, 09:26 PM
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I'm fairly certain that if the OP isn't convinced on going projection, nothing will. I'm on my third projector now and I laugh when I hear about people buying their "massive" 70 inch screen for somewhere in the range of three thousand dollars. My friend just bought a BenQ 1080p projector for $899 and he has it set to 120" on his wall. And the image is fantastic - super sharp and clean. I now have five friends that have converted to front projection after coming over to my house for a movie. People see it and think, "oh, I can't have that in my house - it's too expensive." It couldn't be farther from the truth. Is it a bit more work to install it? Not necessarily. Are the black levels as good? Maybe not, but if you get the right screen, maybe. Can I watch it with ambient light? With enough lumens and the right screen, yes. Will all of my friends be jealous of my setup? Hell yes, they will! You will never, ever go back to a TV after you've experienced what a front projection setup can do to immerse you in the movie/game/show. And as Rich has said, it never gets old. I get so excited when I get to go down to my theater and pop in a movie or load up a game on Steam. If my wife had a quarter for every time I said, "did I mention I LOVE my home theater?", we'd be filthy rich.

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post #33 of 38 Old 04-22-2014, 10:46 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmoneyman2323 View Post

No problem, Its an old video and the room really has taken a different transformation since then, but it does show the quality you can get out of a living room home theater set up. Now the last items on my list is to black out the first 5 feet in front of my screen to improve contrast even more, and i want to install some motorized curtains that will black out the entire wall behind the screen when I bring down the screen.

I say go for it, and you will be happy once installed.

why do you need to black out the wall? Does it do anything to the picture? or just creates more contrast?

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post #34 of 38 Old 04-22-2014, 11:16 AM
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I think it cuts down on reflected light and makes the image pop and the blacks look better. (More of a theater type experience) I get a lot of reflected light on my off white walls...but I would never consider painting my walls a flat black or a darker color until I create a dedicated movie room.  They (big guys) say the same thing with darker flooring/carpet.

 

Just look at my picture by my name (to the left)  and you can see what the image looks like with my sliding glass door blinds/curtain open.  Picture the wall/ceiling/carpet a flat black and the image would look much better/brighter against a black background.

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post #35 of 38 Old 04-22-2014, 11:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pianist718 View Post

why do you need to black out the wall? Does it do anything to the picture? or just creates more contrast?

A projection screen, unlike a TV does not make light, it reflects it. So.. if you have a scene that has a dark area and a light area, the dark spots are made by the projector not lighting up that spot.. The light parts shine out into the room, bound off of light colored objects (ceiling walls and floor) and shine back on the dark areas.. I think you can guess what it does to the image?
This is the area of projection setup that is most ignored and plays a VERY large part in achieving a good image.. Most people don't like a black velvet ceiling in the livingroom... again see images in my signiture "Before" (day time view of TV in my living room) and "After" (night time projection viewing)
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post #36 of 38 Old 04-22-2014, 12:53 PM
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The only issue (other than the wife would kill me and I have to sell my house in a year or so) I have with painting or curtains or even a screen is the aspect ratio of the image changes depending on the medium such as cable/blu-ray/dvd/480p/720p/1080p.  As a novice home theater guy, I like the flexibility of not being limited or having to reconfigure curtains every time I change from HBO to a blu-ray.  While the image is not perfect (I'm not the best screen wall painter.), it is still amazing.  I dial down the light from the projector to compensate for the off white walls and control the light into the area as much as possible.

 

Now in my future home and as I gain experience with home theater, I will paint the walls and I plan on building (or buying) the house around the home theater (as much as possible).

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post #37 of 38 Old 04-22-2014, 02:46 PM
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The principle difference between a large flat panel and a two-piece projection system is that the former renders a "TV experience" and the latter delivers a "cinema experience". TV's have glassy reflective surfaces and glow like...well, like TVs. A large projection screen interfaces with your biology differently...no glass -- no reflection...just the image itself filling your field of vision, making it possible to suspend disbelief...just like it did when you went to the movies as a kid. If you want to "watch" a movie, you can certainly do so on a TV, but if you want to "experience" the movie, you can really only do that with a good projector and a large screen.
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post #38 of 38 Old 04-22-2014, 05:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steve1106 View Post

I think it cuts down on reflected light and makes the image pop and the blacks look better. (More of a theater type experience) I get a lot of reflected light on my off white walls...but I would never consider painting my walls a flat black or a darker color until I create a dedicated movie room.  They (big guys) say the same thing with darker flooring/carpet.

Just look at my picture by my name (to the left)  and you can see what the image looks like with my sliding glass door blinds/curtain open.  Picture the wall/ceiling/carpet a flat black and the image would look much better/brighter against a black background.

I'm not going to paint my ceiling as I know I will probably sell my home in the next 5 years, what I'm going to do is black out the first five feet of my ceiling where reflections are most noticeable. I'm using stretch velvet I purchased from JoAnn Fabrics and some large foam core boards. I will glue the velvet to the foam core boards using with an adhesive spray and gorilla tape and then mount the covered foam core boards on the ceiling. It's very reversible, and I got the idea from other threads here on AVS (black theater improvement). Also got the idea of materials to use from the place below.

http://forum.blu-ray.com/showthread.php?t=123152&page=6

If you scroll down in the link you will see what this guy did to improve contrast and stop light reflections above his screen in his living room. I'm just going to extend the black velvet to about 5 feet from the screen on the ceiling.
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