fixed or retractable - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
Old 09-03-2000, 09:30 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
mfrizzz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: mitchellville, md USA
Posts: 66
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
My new house is under constuction, so I'm turning serious attention to the HT room. Come the first of the year, I will spend about $12,000 on the best dila or dlp available. I will set it up in a projector room about 24 feet from the screen. But I'm totally confused on the screen. The HT Room is huge 24x34 in the basement, so light is no problem. Here's my question: what are the relative merits and negatives of a fixed screen versus retractable? I want an 8 to 10 foot (width) 16X9 screen. I will buy it, not build it. Also, being a projector neophyte, what does "gain'' mean. And how much or how little gain will I need in a room that I can make completely dark??? Are there other screen issues that I need to consider???

thanks,
mike
mfrizzz is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 09-03-2000, 06:53 PM
AVS Special Member
 
LeeAntin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Lynbrook,NY,USA
Posts: 2,311
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Mike,

Having a fixed or retractable screen is usually dictated by the following variables:

1. Wife Acceptance Factor (WAF)- If you were to have an HT setup in a living room, the wife might not like the look of a fixed screen dominating a room really meant for conversation with the lights on.

2. Cost- The price of a retractable is considerably higher than a fixed. many times it is double the cost. Sometimes it is triple.

With a dedicated room that is going to be specifically designed for Home Theater, I would use a fixed screen. As a matter of fact, I have a dedicated HT and do use a 16x9 perforated fixed screen from Stewart Filmscreen Corp. They are more expensive than Da-Lite or Draper but you get what you pay for.

Gain on a screen. Gain is the amount of amplification that the screen introduces when reflecting the light that hits it back to the viewer. The numbers run from 1 to 4. The most common is 1.3. A white screen can go up to 1.8 and even 2.0 but no higher. If you want a higher gain than 2.0 you have to go to a Gray screen that will give 2.5. Then if you want to go even higher, you go to a Silver screen which used to be available at both 3.0 and 4.0 but is now only available at 4.0.

Now you are going to ask "well Lee, what gain should I use?" By specificing that you will go to either a DILA or DLP, then additional gain is not needed. Both of these PJ's are very bright. The difference between a 1.3 or a 1.5 will be unnoticable. High Gain screens are really used for the CRT PJ HT's because the ANSI Lumens is 300 or less. You are talking about equipment that will have 800 or 1000 ANSI lumens.

The big question you have to ask yourself is how big an image do you want? When talking about 16x9 screens we quote the width of the screen as opposed to a 4x3 screen where the diagonal is quoted. Numbers like 84 or 96 or 107, these are the sizes of 16x9 screens in inches.

How close will you be sitting from the image? You have a big room so you can sit backa bit and put up a really big image like a 119 screen. Now the limiting factor becomes the ceiling height. There is someone on this forum using a 138 inch screen. That screen is almost 7 feet high. He is using a DILA with a special lens to get al the light on the screen that he can.

Hope this answers your questions and at the same time causes you ask more questions. The more questions you have the better prepared you will be when it comes time to spend the money and make the whole thing a showpiece.

Lee
LeeAntin is offline  
Old 09-03-2000, 10:02 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
mfrizzz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: mitchellville, md USA
Posts: 66
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Thanks Lee, That was very, very helpful. I'm having nine foot ceilings built in the basement so that will give me some options. But I'm one of those people who sits in the back of the movie theater, so i don't want to be overwelmed by the image. The seating area (lounge chairs/sofa) will be about 18 feet from the screen, and about five feet in front of the projector room at the rear of the room. I'm leaning towards the fixed screen. If I buy a Draper screen, as you suggest, does it come with a frame or do I have to buy or have one built separately? What size screen is reasonable, and not overwleming to view from 18 feet. Are there any maintenance issues with a fixed screen? Does it need to be covered and does it pick up alot of dust? The room is going to be used for TV, music and my bar will be in there. The other issue for me is that I watch alot of regular TV and sports. So the 16X9 screen will have to be big enough so I can project a good 4X3 image. How high off the ground should the projector be, if it is a dlp or dila shooting from 24 feet away? I have to tell the builder soon where to leave a hole in the wall from the projector room. And I took care of that WAF issue early in the game. I gave her two finished rooms in the attic. i own the basement!!!!!
thanks again,
mike
mfrizzz is offline  
Old 09-03-2000, 10:28 PM
AVS Special Member
 
LeeAntin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Lynbrook,NY,USA
Posts: 2,311
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Mike,

I was advocating buying a Stewart screen. It comes with a frame that you easily assemble and the screen snaps to the back of the frame. It comes with everything that you will need to do the job including the frame mounting hardware.

As far as size, you would probably want either an 84" or a 96". The Gain can be either 1.3 or 1.5. It would be mounted on the wall with a distance of between 18" and 24" from the floor. Here is something for you to try right away and it will cost you less than $20;

Take an old bed sheet and cut it to resemble the size screen that you prefer. Make a simple frame out of some old 1x2 lumber and staple the bed sheet to the frame, then hang the frame on the wall. Experiment with the distance from the floor. Stare at it a while to see if you develop any crinks in your neck, meaning it's too high. Personally, I prefer to have my head about 1' below screen center (the point in the exact center of the screen)

The Stewart screen will probably cost about $1,000 plus shipping. It is easily cleaned with a very mild solution of soap and water and the only real maintenance will be to dust it once a week. Of course you never want anyone to touch the screen with their bare hands. I use a small feather duster.

As far as the setup of the DILA, my expertise is with CRT PJ's. I would immediately post your question on the DLP,LCD,DILA section of this Forum. You will get a quick answer but you will need to tell them how big a screen you will be using so that they can calculate the maximum zoom versus the maximum distance.

Good luck and post your progress.

Lee
LeeAntin is offline  
Old 09-04-2000, 12:00 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
mfrizzz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: mitchellville, md USA
Posts: 66
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
thanks Lee, My screen issue is solved. Now, I can move on to others.
mfrizzz is offline  
Old 09-06-2000, 04:48 PM
AVS Special Member
 
dreamer's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Walnut, CA, USA
Posts: 1,324
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 219 Post(s)
Liked: 61
Mike,

It really will depend on the projector in terms of height and distance.

All D-ILA projectors are 100% offset -- which means that the center of the projector's lens needs to go at either the top edge or bottom edge of the screen. And as you zoom, that edge will stay fixed. The zoom range on the G11 and G15 is 1.9 to 2.8 screen widths. Which means that from 24 feet the largest width you will get is 151 inches, but more importantly for you is that the minimum is 103 inches. This is as small as you will be able to zoom it down -- roughly 8 1/2 feet.

As to the height of the projector mounting, keep in mind that in a ceiling mount, the projector's lens center will hang at least 8" below the mounting bracket. So a 16:9 screen at 103 inches wide will be 58 inches tall, and the highest you can mount it is 8 inches below the ceiling -- since the DILA has no keystone adjustment you will need the screen at the same height as the lens -- leaving the bottom of the screen at 42 inches off the floor. This is probably a good thing, as you don't want people's heads in the light-path, you don't want the screen too low. You may want to take four pieces of string and stretch them from an imaginary lens to the four corners of your proposed screen. You may be surprised how you are limited in order to keep seating positions out of the light-path.

You may also note that with the maximum size screen from 24 feet distance, an 86 inch height is necessary -- which would have its bottom only 14 inches off the floor. Again, staying out of the light-path may eliminate a lot of the useable seating space in the room.

------------------
Thanks,
Kirk

*********************
Kirk Ellis
JVC DLA-RS1 VuTec 122" Screen
Harmon Kardon AVR 247 Parasound L&R Amp
Psycoustic Mark III L&R Towers, Boston Center
Energy Take 5 Surrounds, HSU Research Sub
dreamer is offline  
Old 09-06-2000, 07:33 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
mfrizzz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: mitchellville, md USA
Posts: 66
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Yikes. Thanks Kirk. That certainly gives me something else to think about.
mike
mfrizzz is offline  
 
Thread Tools


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off