Official Owners' Thread, Panasonic PT-AE8000U (US version) PT-AT6000E (European version) - Page 178 - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews

Forum Jump: 
 271Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #5311 of 5331 Old 11-05-2016, 11:59 PM
Member
 
Fazzz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: CT
Posts: 137
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 56 Post(s)
Liked: 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dominic Chan View Post
Unless there's a physical obstacle in the way, it's always better to centre the projector horizontally relative to the screen. Vertical lens shift is a different story - most people prefer to mount it closer to the ceiling and use vertical lens shift to centre the image.
However, if you have a scope screen (2.4:1 aspect ratio) and use the "zoom method" to remove the black bars, the mounting is much more limited, both in terms of height, and the distance from the screen.
Not sure if I explained things clear enough. No obstacle in the way and I plan on a 16:9 screen. My projector will be about 6 inches under my ceiling since I have a low ceiling. Since the lens isn't in the center of the AE8000U projector I'm wondering if I should mount it so the lens is in the horizontal center of the room. Or should I put the body of the projector in the center (meaning the lens would be slightly offcenter) and use the horizontal lens shift to center the image?

Here's what I'm referring to:



Maybe it doesn't matter. Just wondering how everyone else has done it.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Panny placement.jpg
Views:	338
Size:	94.5 KB
ID:	1756177  
Fazzz is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #5312 of 5331 Old 11-06-2016, 05:21 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Mississauga, ON, Canada
Posts: 1,631
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 945 Post(s)
Liked: 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fazzz View Post
Since the lens isn't in the center of the AE8000U projector I'm wondering if I should mount it so the lens is in the horizontal center of the room. Or should I put the body of the projector in the center (meaning the lens would be slightly offcenter) and use the horizontal lens shift to center the image?
My previous reply stands. You should use lens shift only if you have to; so it's the lens, not the projector body, that should be centred. Of course, this assumes the screen is centred on the opposite wall.
Dominic Chan is online now  
post #5313 of 5331 Old 11-06-2016, 10:44 AM
AVS Special Member
 
m. zillch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 6,729
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1603 Post(s)
Liked: 1037
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fazzz View Post
When everyone mounted their projector did you mount it so the lens is in the middle of the room or mount it so the projector is in the middle with the lens slightly off center and then use the lens shift to center the image?
If you want to make your life easy for using the CIH auto zoom feature do this: Mount the the projector such that the lens is fairly centered to the screen, left to right (a few inches off doesn't matter), and it's height off the ground is the same as the exact top edge of the screen, but no higher [some people can sneak by putting it even higher still, but only just a bit, and more importantly the alignment process and image shift calibrations they have to go through are markedly more fiddly, complex, and non-intuitive to get things just right for auto zooming.
I show what this nifty auto zoom feature does here:
Fazzz likes this.
m. zillch is offline  
post #5314 of 5331 Old 11-06-2016, 11:03 AM
Member
 
Fazzz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: CT
Posts: 137
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 56 Post(s)
Liked: 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dominic Chan View Post
My previous reply stands. You should use lens shift only if you have to; so it's the lens, not the projector body, that should be centred. Of course, this assumes the screen is centred on the opposite wall.
Thanks. Just making sure. I've had to redo too many things in building so far and this is definitely one I don't want to screw up.
Fazzz is online now  
post #5315 of 5331 Old 11-06-2016, 11:41 AM
Newbie
 
_wire_'s Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 11
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fazzz View Post
Or should I put the body of the projector in the center (meaning the lens would be slightly offcenter) and use the horizontal lens shift to center the image?
The shift works quite well. Optical aberrations from shift tend to occur only at the most extreme shift settings, if at all.

The distance offset from the center of the projector body to the center of the lens is a few inches, whereas the shift range is in proportions of the screen size. Moreover, you'll notice that there's no definitive center of the shift mechanism. Just a midpoint which is fungible.

So mount the projector body perfectly centered if you like.

Last edited by _wire_; 11-06-2016 at 11:45 AM.
_wire_ is online now  
post #5316 of 5331 Old 11-06-2016, 12:01 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Mississauga, ON, Canada
Posts: 1,631
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 945 Post(s)
Liked: 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by _wire_ View Post
Moreover, you'll notice that there's no definitive center of the shift mechanism. Just a midpoint which is fungible.
If the lens is "perfectly" centred, when you change the zoom the image will remain centred.
If then lens if off centre and you use lens shift to centre the image, the image will shift in position as you change the zoom.
Centering the lens will not make the projector "look" off-centre with just a few inches to one side.
Dominic Chan is online now  
post #5317 of 5331 Old 11-06-2016, 12:55 PM
Newbie
 
_wire_'s Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 11
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dominic Chan View Post
If the lens is "perfectly" centred, when you change the zoom the image will remain centred.
If then lens if off centre and you use lens shift to centre the image, the image will shift in position as you change the zoom.
Centering the lens will not make the projector "look" off-centre with just a few inches to one side.
If this is true, how does lens zoom memory feature work? I've never used the feature. But I've never noticed the shift skewed by zoom.
_wire_ is online now  
post #5318 of 5331 Old 11-06-2016, 01:11 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Mississauga, ON, Canada
Posts: 1,631
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 945 Post(s)
Liked: 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by _wire_ View Post
If this is true, how does lens zoom memory feature work? I've never used the feature. But I've never noticed the shift skewed by zoom.
This shift is the reason the projector needs to be mounted at a certain height for people who use the "zoom method" with 2.40:1 aspect ratio screens. Search this thread and you'll find many discussions.

If you've not noticed the shift it simply means the lens is centred to the extent that the shift is not noticeable.

In any case, if you want to prove it right or wrong, it just involves a simple test.
Dominic Chan is online now  
post #5319 of 5331 Old 11-08-2016, 03:50 PM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 0
Unhappy Yellow discoloration - old bulb or burnt panel?

As you can see from the attached image, my AE8000U has developed a yellowish blemish on the upper right and right middle part of the screen. It's of course more pronounced on a pure white background (sorry my camera shot makes everything blue-ish). I only noticed it recently. The projector is only a couple weeks away from it's two-year anniversary and I am still on my first lamp, but it is now flashing RED at 4334 hours - 85% of that was on ECO, now running normal mode.

My question is do you think its likely that the deteriorating lamp might be causing this? I hate to invest $350.00 in a new lamp only to find its not the problem, then have Panny tell me its going to cost $1000+ to repair.

Follow up question - the projector is 2 weeks away from it's two year purchase date but it has 4334 hours on it - will Panasonic still consider it in-warranty? Anyone have experience with this?

Thanks in advance for your input!

Dan
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	20161108_172831.jpg
Views:	53
Size:	68.2 KB
ID:	1760985  
NTI Service is offline  
post #5320 of 5331 Old 11-10-2016, 04:24 PM
Member
 
timevacuum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 29
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Well here is a question from left field: Does anyone care to comment on the possibility of hacking the PCB to get an audio out from the projector?

A number of new media streamers/casters have only HDMI out with no separate connection for audio. For use with a projector like ours, one must use another box in the chain to peel off the sound. Either a receiver with HDMI in or an audio splitter of some kind. I noticed from the service manual that IC1001 has digital and analogue audio outputs that a brave soul might be able to tap into. Even if a person could get connected to the points on the IC, would there be non-adjustable configuration of the IC that would prevent the signal from being output to those pins?

I ask as my amp does not have HDMI and I'm a cheap bastard and just generally like to think about what might be possible.

In reality, it is unlikely that I would risk a several thousand dollar projector trying to solder the connection points so call this more of an exercise. And why the heck didn't they just put the audio output on the thing in the first place?

T.
timevacuum is offline  
post #5321 of 5331 Old 11-10-2016, 04:29 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Mississauga, ON, Canada
Posts: 1,631
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 945 Post(s)
Liked: 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by NTI Service View Post
My question is do you think its likely that the deteriorating lamp might be causing this?
Not likely. A deteriorated lamp will make the image dim but not cause localized discoloration.
Dominic Chan is online now  
post #5322 of 5331 Old 11-10-2016, 05:12 PM
Newbie
 
_wire_'s Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 11
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by NTI Service View Post
My question is do you think its likely that the deteriorating lamp might be causing this? I hate to invest $350.00 in a new lamp only to find its not the problem, then have Panny tell me its going to cost $1000+ to repair.

Follow up question - the projector is 2 weeks away from it's two year purchase date but it has 4334 hours on it - will Panasonic still consider it in-warranty? Anyone have experience with this?
Blotch is not the lamp. Very likely that the optics have scorched.

Hours are way out of warranty.

Is that picture true to the color of white you see on screen? Yikes. A new lamp may or may not help that white balance. If you choose to try, buy a genuine Panasonic lamp and pay the premium for it. But live with the blotch.

What your photos shows is in line with three Panasonic projectors I've had.

Someone might be quick to chime in about how they have had no problems. Good for them.

My interaction with Panasonic over an 8000 that was turning gross during warranty was they repair, they don't replace, the repair looked as worse than the problem I sent my 8000 in for, and support said clearly I cannot expect a pj at 2000 hours to look like it did when I unboxed it. You're at 4000+ hours.
_wire_ is online now  
post #5323 of 5331 Old 11-11-2016, 10:30 AM
AVS Special Member
 
m. zillch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 6,729
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1603 Post(s)
Liked: 1037
Just read this while researching about SXRD degradation, a different technology than LCD, lots of people are complaining about:

"Weaknesses and Limitations of LCD

Unknown lifespan of LCD panels. Given enough prolonged exposure to high intensity UV light and extreme heat, the organic compounds used in most LCD panels are expected to degrade over long periods of time. This degradation can lead to a discoloration of the image and a reduction in contrast. The only way to fix it is to replace the damaged LCD panel, which is typically a cost-prohibitive proposition. You are normally better off buying a new projector.

The big question of course is how long the panels will last. There is no good data on this subject that has been compiled by an independent lab and published for general consumption. LCD vendors do not typically acknowledge LCD degradation can occur, so they don't make any representations about expected life. In general, most LCD vendors maintain that to the degree LCD panels might be subject to eventual degradation, it will be beyond the practical life of the product.

One trusted and very experienced industry source who develops products using both LCD and DLP technology believes that LCD panels have a lifespan in the range of 4,000 to 10,000 hours, with the lifespan depending on how bright the projector is--the brightest LCD light cannons will produce the most stress on the panels resulting in quicker degradation. Low brightness models such as those made for home theater will produce the least stress, and are expected to last longer.

Texas Instruments has performed several tests on LCD lifespan over the past seven years. Based on these tests, they believe that LCD panels will degrade faster than the LCD vendors are willing to admit, and certainly more quickly than the 4000 hours just quoted. The 3LCD camp's response is that TI's tests have been performed by running LCD projectors continuously 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, for several months straight. According to 3LCD and Epson, since the projectors used in TI's lab tests were never designed for a continuous operation high-stress duty.
"

source: http://www.projectorcentral.com/lcd_...nd-Limitations
KillerBee likes this.

Last edited by m. zillch; 11-11-2016 at 10:33 AM.
m. zillch is offline  
post #5324 of 5331 Old 11-14-2016, 06:49 AM
Senior Member
 
winwinc81's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 228
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 118 Post(s)
Liked: 16
I noticed dust blobs for about 2 plus years of usage... it only runs 550 plus hrs.. initially a blue blob Was noticeable on the lower right.. I took out the cover and start blasting up down left right of the 3 ribbon using dslr camera dust blaster....

After which, the blue blob gotten 'dimmer', however a new, more noticeable 'green' like blob appears on the top left... this time round no matter how I blow it, it just won't go away...

I gave up as no matter how I do it... it really just won't go away... any more idea and solutions?

My panny got no more warranty...

Sent from my ASUS_Z00AD using Tapatalk
winwinc81 is offline  
post #5325 of 5331 Old 11-20-2016, 06:25 PM
AVS Special Member
 
ckenisell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 3,771
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 102 Post(s)
Liked: 60
Hey guys. Let's talk calibration...

When using a disc like Spears & Munsil, DVE, or Disney's WOW calibration Blu-rays, what picture mode do you guys put the projector in when you first begin? Do you use the same picture mode for 3D as you you do for 2D? Is there a particular picture mode that renders less 3D crosstalk?

Also, for the various picture modes, there is some kind of lens filter that mechanically slides into place. Anybody care to educate me on the purpose and science behind this lens filter?
ckenisell is online now  
post #5326 of 5331 Old 11-20-2016, 07:07 PM
AVS Special Member
 
m. zillch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 6,729
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1603 Post(s)
Liked: 1037
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckenisell View Post
Also, for the various picture modes, there is some kind of lens filter that mechanically slides into place. Anybody care to educate me on the purpose and science behind this lens filter?
The three LCD panels, R,G, and B, I believe made my Epson, do their best to make all the colors they can using the lamp's light which isn't exactly a pure white [it is "red rich"]. The system can only go so far so a kludgey Band-aid approach was devised to intentional colorize the lamp's light with a color filter or "gel" and then correct for it with the panels. It works pretty well although it reduces light throughput so for the brightest output you don't want to use it.

Although Panasonic ads describe some of their technologies quite poorly, such as Smooth Screen, they get this one right:

"Pure Color Filter Pro for Rich, Vibrant Colors

The optical filter optimizes the light spectrum from the UHM projector lamp, helping to produce deeper blacks while improving purity levels in the three primary colors (red, green and blue). This advanced filter system improves color purity to cover a range that extends from the HDTV standard (Rec. 709 mode)*1 to the color gamut used in digital cinema*2. This gives images the deep, rich coloring that distinguishes movie images.

*1 A setting that supports the 6,500K color temperature recommended in the HDTV standard (ITU-R BT.709).
*2 Specifications put forth by the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE) PR431-2."

source: http://panasonic.net/avc/projector/p...features1.html

Unless you have a problem with the reduced light because you project onto a huge screen, have competing lights in the room, or have a screen with very low reflectivity, I would generally recommend using the filter. Besides improving color accuracy the light loss actually improves the darkness of black slightly, as does using the dimmer ECO mode.

I almost never use 3D and don't know much about it.

In A/V reproduction accuracy, there IS no concept of "accounting for personal taste/preference". As art consumers we don't "pick" the level of bass, nor the tint/brightness of a scene's sky, any more than we pick the ending of a novel or Mona Lisa's type of smile. "High fidelity" means "high truthfulness", faithful to the original artist's intent: an unmodified, neutral, accurate copy of the original master, ideally being exact and with no discernable alterations, aka "transparency".

Last edited by m. zillch; 11-20-2016 at 07:10 PM.
m. zillch is offline  
post #5327 of 5331 Old 11-20-2016, 08:31 PM
AVS Special Member
 
ckenisell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 3,771
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 102 Post(s)
Liked: 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by m. zillch View Post
Unless you have a problem with the reduced light because you project onto a huge screen, have competing lights in the room, or have a screen with very low reflectivity, I would generally recommend using the filter. Besides improving color accuracy the light loss actually improves the darkness of black slightly, as does using the dimmer ECO mode.
Thanks for the information. What picture modes actually utilize the filter and which do not?
ckenisell is online now  
post #5328 of 5331 Old 11-20-2016, 09:03 PM
AVS Special Member
 
m. zillch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 6,729
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1603 Post(s)
Liked: 1037
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckenisell View Post
Thanks for the information. What picture modes actually utilize the filter and which do not?
You can ID them by listening to the motors moving the filter into and out of the light path:

With color filter:

REC 709 [what I personally use 99% of the time, in my dark room]
D-Cinema
Cinema 1

Without color filter:

Cinema 2
Game
Normal
Dynamic [this mode is the brightest because it is designed for maximum light output at the expense of maintaining color accuracy]

Keep in mind as you switch these modes you also can have different settings for all of your picture adjustments so theoretically you can manually brighten the darker modes by pumping up the brightness and contrast and vice versa, however all things being equal the last four will be the brightest modes and the first three the dimmest.

In A/V reproduction accuracy, there IS no concept of "accounting for personal taste/preference". As art consumers we don't "pick" the level of bass, nor the tint/brightness of a scene's sky, any more than we pick the ending of a novel or Mona Lisa's type of smile. "High fidelity" means "high truthfulness", faithful to the original artist's intent: an unmodified, neutral, accurate copy of the original master, ideally being exact and with no discernable alterations, aka "transparency".
m. zillch is offline  
post #5329 of 5331 Old 11-22-2016, 08:29 PM
Newbie
 
_wire_'s Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 11
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckenisell View Post
Hey guys. Let's talk calibration...

When using a disc like Spears & Munsil, DVE, or Disney's WOW calibration Blu-rays, what picture mode do you guys put the projector in when you first begin? Do you use the same picture mode for 3D as you you do for 2D? Is there a particular picture mode that renders less 3D crosstalk?

Also, for the various picture modes, there is some kind of lens filter that mechanically slides into place. Anybody care to educate me on the purpose and science behind this lens filter?
Never cared about 3D. Cared a lot about color and brightness.

To my taste there was only one mode: Normal, with color temp pulled towards red using both the white point control and the gain/bias controls. Panasonic''s 709 didn't look right to me new, and I liked it less as the unit aged and got dimmer.

New I thought the 8000 color was very good in normal mode. But caveat: green is Panasonic's sore spot: green/yellow are too hot and weird. Fire and some movie grading tricks, used in stuff with eerie green light, like Pirates of the Caribbean, Traffic, etc, looked unatural. So I rejected filtered modes, 709 and cinema, as dull and lifeless but maybe yellow/green was better controlled? The loss of brighteness and overall color gamut wasn''t worth it.

To me, Normal had the best balance of brightness and color balance, after some tweaking of the advanced controls.

I built a custom ICC profile for my HTPC using a DTP94 in this mode, native white point, and it looled quite good. For the first few hundred hours.
_wire_ is online now  
post #5330 of 5331 Old Yesterday, 11:59 AM
AVS Special Member
 
JHouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Richmond, Texas (Southwesternish burb of Houston)
Posts: 4,722
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 17
For all those people asking which projector to buy, I can safely say this is the one. You won't be disappointed. For 99% percent of us, you'll find a setting you love straight out of the factory present options. It might take you 4 minutes.

It is bright, detailed, high contrast, engrossing, realistic, stunning, and compares quite favorably with my 65" 4K LED lit LCD flat panel. It's kind of a miracle. This is my 5th Panasonic projector over the last 15 years or so. They get strikingly better each time, and this one is conclusive proof.

You're welcome.

And just to grab views by newbies through the search engine:

Best Projector

Top Projector

Best Value

Best Picture

Which projector

should I buy

Joe -----

The harder it is to tell the difference, the less difference it makes.

 

"I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude." -- Thomas Jefferson, translated from Latin

 

Also translated as "I prefer dangerous freedom over peaceful slavery" 

JHouse is offline  
post #5331 of 5331 Old Today, 08:30 AM
Newbie
 
_wire_'s Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 11
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckenisell View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by m. zillch View Post
Besides improving color accuracy the light loss actually improves the darkness of black slightly, as does using the dimmer ECO mode.
Thanks for the information.
By this reasoning, turning the projector off gives unparalled blacks, you know, unless you're bothered by the light loss.

When working well, fresh out of the box, the lamp is new, before the polarizers scorch, or the panels degrade, the 8000 has good brightness and contrast, and pure black screen is competitively dark.

But because of dynamic iris, dark scenes are murky. As the lamp ages this gets worse. And even when at its best, brightness pumps because of iris. Yarg.

The previous post regarding TI study of LCD optics degrading doesn't surprise me, based on my experience with three Panasonics.

My 8000 blacks started to go bad within two months of use and by 1200 hours were shot.

Unlike Epson, Panasonic doesn't offer an overnite replacement under warranty, they are very clear that you send it in at your own risk and you are on the line for shipping to get the unit to them, $75, a minimum of $180 evaluation fee and possibly a $1000 in repair fees, which they may waive -if- they determine that you eligible for warranty service. Their stance is they might assist with warranty, if you are worthy. Their first priority is to protect themselves, as if their business has an onerous and long-standing service cost problem.

So I waited to send mine in, not wanting to deal with the uncertainty of service and wondering if I could just live with it?nothing's perfect.

Also Panasonic's support on the web is messed up. If you've ever seen what company web sites look like when no one in the company seems care about their customer engagement. You have to really look to find the support page, and there are too-broad categories (menus that read "consumer" "professional" "heavy industry" "blow dryers" "shavers" and as you drill towards your objective you hit dead ends and backwaters on the site, then you find via google that the support site you need is not even connected to the main corporate site, and the form for support info didn't work properly for your browser, so you have to send email, then they respond with a form that requests the same info you provided in the engagement email all over again as if you're nobody.

So I put off returning my 8000, but as the picture got slowly worse and warranty was running out, I had to face it, so I sent it to "Heartland" which is some sort of Panasonic USA service subsidiary or contractor.

Good news was they covered the service under warranty so I was out only $70 shipping, and they turned it around within two days, so it was gone for about a week overall.

Very bad news, the repaired unit was returned with a far worse picture than I sent in. It had a note on it that reads "replaced optical block" and saying to appreciate the technician's high standards, but when I fire it up it's dim, overall color is sickly blue-green with nowhere close to proper white, and there's a big blob in the center like a scorched polarizer. I did not send it in with these problems. My issue was poor contrast due to bad blacks. The repair looked like service put in an assembly from the parts bin hoping I would call it good. AFAIK they could have just hit it with a hammer.

Very disappointed.

And there's a history. I am three for three of Panasonic models degraded to unwatchable by 2000 hours. The first two were out of warranty so I upgraded: First time I thought maybe a production issue that's improving?tech can go like this. Second time I thought bad luck. Third time and failed repair, I thought shame on me.

The insult that caps my disappointment is Panasonic support being very clear, saying directly: do not expect these units to last. Their attitude is the device is expected to degrade and the warranty covers exceptional failure..

It's super interesting how on one hand Panasonic marketing pitches superior picture quality and incredible technology, while their support explains that picture quality is subjective and I should get over it.

So I have no problem with the TI article on LCDs. Won't surprise me a bit to hear that LCD tech has longevity issues.

I gave my repaired 8000 away. It's better than nothing as a freebie. But I couldn't sell it in good conscience.

I am wary of Epson becsuse design is so similar to Panasonic. But Epson service looks to be far more responsive than Panasonic, with their offer of overnite replacement under warranty.

I tried Sony 45 because it uses a distinctly different LCD panel and optical tech from Panasonic & Epson. Best if it just works and never requires support.

Now that I've used a Sony 45 for 500 hours I would not trade it for a new 8000. 45 picture is superior in every way and much more enjoyable for movies, TV, and games.

I suggest anyone shopping today should look at Sony or Epson before Panasonic.

I''m not in a turf war. I have conventional expectations: an attractive picture when fed 1080 709 content, and performance that holds up for 5 or more years. If this Sony goes bad, I will post here just as I'm now complaining about the 8000.

I offer this in hope others have a better experience.
_wire_ is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply Digital Hi-End Projectors - $3,000+ USD MSRP

Tags
Epson 5020ub Powerlite Home Cinema 3d Front Projector , Jvc Dla X35 3d Hd Front Projector , Panasonic Pt Ae7000u 1080p Full Hd Projector , Panasonic Pt Ae4000u 1600 Lumen Lcd Home Theater Projector , Sony Vpl Hw50es 3d Projector , Darbeevision Darblet Hdmi Video Processor , Panasonic Ptae8000u Hd Projector
Gear in this thread



Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off