Real-world difference between a bigger screen vs sitting closer? - Page 3 - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
Forum Jump: 
 5Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #61 of 75 Old 09-16-2013, 12:43 PM
AVS Forum Addicted Member
 
zombie10k's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 11,418
Mentioned: 96 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3870 Post(s)
Liked: 3951
Quote:
Originally Posted by dougri View Post

anyway, here is the article I mentioned about human vision (in comparison to a camera)... fun read: http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/cameras-vs-human-eye.htm

that's a good article. When we have 14 stops of dynamic range on the cameras AND the displays, Sony will have to relinquish their term 'Reality Creation' unless that is, they are the one's that find the magic tech to re-created the dynamic ability of our sight.

HDR + OLED should get pretty close, much better than what we have now with front projectors.
zombie10k is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #62 of 75 Old 09-16-2013, 04:58 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
fierce_gt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 6,454
Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1772 Post(s)
Liked: 1689
i'm pretty convinced that my Samsung f8500 can already produce more ansi contrast than my eyes can perceive. when I crank up the brightness and watch a scene with large bright areas and some dark shadowy details I lose the details in the shadows. that is, until I block the bright areas of the screen with my hand, and give my eyes a couple seconds to adjust, then I can see the details in the shadows again.


but, to go back to the discussion of size vs viewing distance. I think i'll sum up my opinion this way:
moving a small screen closer to you does not give the impression of a larger screen, but moving a large screen farther away from you does give the impression of a smaller screen.

when I had my 120" screen set up about 14" from my viewing distance and got used to that 'size', I felt the cheaper theatres in the area had 'smaller' screens by comparison. they were obviously much larger, but I was way too far away. yet on the flip side, comparing to a high end theatre, sitting equitable distances from each, the theatre always felt larger than sitting at home.

Displays: Samsung PN64F8500/JVC X35
AVR: Pioneer VSX-1130K, 7.1/5.1.2 audio
Sources: HTPC(Enby), PS3, XBOX360, Wii
Control: Harmony One
fierce_gt is offline  
post #63 of 75 Old 09-16-2013, 09:08 PM
Advanced Member
 
Glen Graham's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 517
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by sstephen View Post

The centre of the screen now is just above eye level when I sit down. It looks a little silly mounted on the wall that low, but I'd much rather not have to look up at the screen while I watch it.

Ding ding! We have a winner. Sadly, too many people factor "the recommended rule" into their equation. Nope.

Screen size is as personal as jacket, eyeware, even your pants and/or underwear.

Before I built my theater, we projected the picture (from a stepladder) onto the blank wall, experimenting with different sizes and placements. After a few weeks, we measured, and realized we **LIKED** 132" back from a 133" screen (18" off the ground).

Check my signature for photos. "Rules of thumb" are too narrow, and suck; everybody should choose their own desire.

Glen
My Home Theater
***********************************
Whatever is not nailed down, is mine.
Whatever I can pry loose... is not nailed down!

Glen Graham is offline  
 
post #64 of 75 Old 09-17-2013, 12:22 PM
AVS Forum Addicted Member
 
stanger89's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Marion, IA
Posts: 22,534
Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3676 Post(s)
Liked: 2046
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glen Graham View Post

Check my signature for photos. "Rules of thumb" are too narrow, and suck; everybody should choose their own desire.

People who argue this (and some people who use rules of thumb) don't take them for what they are, guidelines, starting points, sanity checks. As such they are useful.

If someone comes in here and says "I want to set up a home theater to watch movies, my room is x by y by z and I'll sit L away, help." Telling them "Do whatever you want" helps no one. Rules of thumb are good places to start.

Say that same person said they were going to sit 15' from the front wall and was planning on getting a 32" TV because it's way bigger than the 19" CRT they had before. Well we all know that's crazy, that's way too small, but how do we know that, how do we guide a new person to a realistic solution? Well we compare it to some rules of thumb or industry guidelines.

Common guidance is seating for a theater should be between 2 and 4 picture heights and with a brightness around 16ftL, a 32" TV at that distance is more like 12 picture heights. A more realistic size is between 3.5 and 7', (42 to 84" high). From that we can derive that 84 is probably pushing it size wise (potentially hard to fit in a room and expensive to light) so the user might want to consider moving their seating closer (if they like a big picture). Or maybe they'll need to look into "big iron" projectors or high gain screens to light it all.

But now we have a good starting point. It's helped avoid someone going off into never never land with a system that can't possibly work optimally, like a tiny screen they'll regret later or getting way too big of a screen for the projector they choose to light it with, and being unhappy with the dim picture.

From which (I absolutely agree) the user/OP/new person can draw their own final conclusions about exactly how close they want to sit and how large and how bright they want their solution to be.

In the end it's all about the user being happy with what they have, regardless of if that solution falls within norms or guidelines, but that doesn't mean norms/guidelines/standards are worthless.


-edit

I want to address this:
Quote:
Before I built my theater, we projected the picture (from a stepladder) onto the blank wall, experimenting with different sizes and placements. After a few weeks, we measured, and realized we **LIKED** 132" back from a 133" screen (18" off the ground).

This is a great idea, but it requires that you have some idea of how big and how bright you want to be. How would you have felt if you'd bought a little 200 lumen LED Pico projector, because they're cheap, and LED, and everybody raves about them, only to find out you'd only have about 3ftL of brightness with that setup?

Now obviously that didn't happen, you had a frame of reference to know that a relatively bright HT projector could light that. But if you don't have that frame of reference, that's where rules of thumb come in handy to have a sanity check before hand to avoid planning something that's so far outside of the norm that it's unlikely to work.
Gary Lightfoot and seanbryan like this.
stanger89 is offline  
post #65 of 75 Old 09-17-2013, 12:43 PM
Advanced Member
 
Glen Graham's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 517
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by stanger89 View Post

People who argue this (and some people who use rules of thumb) don't take them for what they are, guidelines, starting points, sanity checks. As such they are useful.

If someone comes in here and says "I want to set up a home theater to watch movies, my room is x by y by z and I'll sit L away, help." Telling them "Do whatever you want" helps no one. Rules of thumb are good places to start.

This is very true and one of my main points (issue?) - few people phrase it as a "starting point". It may be the $3k+ forum has more experienced, but generalizing (other forums, etc), I see too often these stated as "golden rules". A few may speak that they're guidelines, but often they are outnumbered by "rules" (which are often posted by the newbies who bought their screen a week ago and now want to sound like experts, perpetuating the issue).

Then, the newbie runs off and buys the screen, and never realizes that they did not experiment. At first, it is going to be impressive. It took at least a couple weeks for my wife and I to determine the size & height off floor. The final size was bigger and lower than we started, and I'm glad.

Quote:
Originally Posted by stanger89 View Post

Say that same person said they were going to sit 15' from the front wall and was planning on getting a 32" TV because it's way bigger than the 19" CRT they had before. Well we all know that's crazy, that's way too small, but how do we know that, how do we guide a new person to a realistic solution?

Yup, a former coworker converted his garage to a lounge/sitting room. He put a 32" LCD 5 feet off the ground (that's how the Best Buy droid told him, and all the TV he could get on his budget at the time, 5 years ago), about 15' away, put a couple Bose cubes next to it, and activated "widescreen" (stretch-o-vision), and proclaimed that he also had a cool home theater.
Quote:
Originally Posted by stanger89 View Post

From which (I absolutely agree) the user/OP/new person can draw their own final conclusions about exactly how close they want to sit and how large and how bright they want their solution to be.

In the end it's all about the user being happy with what they have, regardless of if that solution falls within norms or guidelines, but that doesn't mean norms/guidelines/standards are worthless.

This is where the human factor enters, loyalty. Just like cars ("I'd rather push a Ford, than drive a Chevy", etc), people tend to believe what they have is best, and defend their choice with inexplicable ferver - especially new (inexperienced) owners.

Experienced and/or seasoned fans tend not to use personal judgement skew recommendations. Calling AVS will give a user a chance to explain their environment, needs, budget, etc - and be guided by a professional to what should work best for the user. Unfortunately, posting on many forums (not singling out this one, others I feel are much worse) gets lots of noise and the true experienced recommendations are drowned out... or those people don't bother trying to be heard.

Even most FAQ's fail to adequately stress that a rule of thumb is a starting place and people owe it to themselves to experiment and dial in their preferences.

Glen
My Home Theater
***********************************
Whatever is not nailed down, is mine.
Whatever I can pry loose... is not nailed down!

Glen Graham is offline  
post #66 of 75 Old 09-18-2013, 07:52 AM
Member
 
jj-34's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Montpellier, France
Posts: 91
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 30 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Another thought about center channel height placement, taken that in general the actors / people in the image have their head / mouth in the top half ( tier ? ) of the image, what if suspending the center channel above and in front of the screen (in front of the black drop eventually) and angled down to the spectators ?

Would that not be a better compromise than near the floor where the sound gets muffled also by the carpeting ( well in my case it does) and that also would allow to lower the screen even more ?

I now have my center above the TV and never had the sensation that the dialogues were not direct from the actors, of course with a screen it would be placed higher which when watching TV could be a problem. I once tried to put the center on the carpeted floor and did not like it at all.

If I have to choose one I'd also favor non AT IQ Vs AT sound positioning plus the fact that AT sound has other speaker's placement constraints too ( distance behind the screen fabric is one ) .
jj-34 is offline  
post #67 of 75 Old 09-18-2013, 08:14 AM
Home Theater Lover
 
Craig Peer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 12,150
Mentioned: 41 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4125 Post(s)
Liked: 4214
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glen Graham

Check my signature for photos. "Rules of thumb" are too narrow, and suck; everybody should choose their own desire.

That may be true, but if you desire a screen as big as the one below with your JVC RS46, I have bad news for you - it's going to be very dim.



Looking at this picture, if that screen is 20' wide, I'll bet that room is close to 1500 square feet alone. I think I know why I don't have a screen that size now ( besides the cost of a projector that could light it up properly ). eek.gif

Current home theater photos - http://www.avsforum.com/photopost/sh...hp?cat=2386514

craigpeer@earthlink.net
Craig Peer is offline  
post #68 of 75 Old 09-18-2013, 08:18 AM
Home Theater Lover
 
Craig Peer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 12,150
Mentioned: 41 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4125 Post(s)
Liked: 4214
Quote:
Another thought about center channel height placement, taken that in general the actors / people in the image have their head / mouth in the top half ( tier ? ) of the image, what if suspending the center channel above and in front of the screen (in front of the black drop eventually) and angled down to the spectators ?

My center channel is above an in front of the screen, and angled down. It works better than it would below the screen in my theater anyway.

Da-Lite HCCV 16:9 screen in front, Stewart ST 130 G3 2.35:1 screen in back.

It's getting harder to see as I paint more walls black, so I used an earlier photo when the walls were gray..............

Current home theater photos - http://www.avsforum.com/photopost/sh...hp?cat=2386514

craigpeer@earthlink.net
Craig Peer is offline  
post #69 of 75 Old 09-18-2013, 11:43 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Forum Special Member
 
curttard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,498
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 136 Post(s)
Liked: 37
I am considering putting my center channel above the screen in the new room as well. I remember reading that supposedly it seems to be coming from the actors more than a speaker below the screen does, although personally I've never really had an issue with below the screen either.
curttard is offline  
post #70 of 75 Old 09-18-2013, 11:46 AM
AVS Forum Addicted Member
 
mark haflich's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Venice, Florida, USA
Posts: 21,464
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1418 Post(s)
Liked: 1012
this issue is whether you have rows of seats on risers and whether the front seats will block the center channel sound. If you fly the center channel, aim it between the the rows and try to keep the acoustical centers of the LRs within two feet of the acoustical center of the center channel This is need so that you percdeive no height chsnge in the sound for an acoustical pan or traverse across the screen.
mark haflich is offline  
post #71 of 75 Old 08-11-2017, 02:26 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 52
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 38 Post(s)
Liked: 14
Necro bump but relevant.

I love the immersion I get from my 120" and have been desperate to replicate it from a TV for various reasons (co-habiting now, not a dedicated theatre, OLED black, OLED 3D). I recently purchased a 65" C6 OLED.

My thoughts on it:
  • There's a good viewing angle calculator online: http://myhometheater.homestead.com/v...alculator.html
  • I knew from that calc that if I push my sofa to 1.3m in front of my screen the viewing angle would be identical to my 120"@ 2.5m.
  • My TV is wall mounted and I had issues sitting this close with a recliner sofa - my fat B&W HTM3s was getting in the way.
  • I purchased an articulating TV bracket that lets me push the TV back and forth by 20" and tilt 20 degrees down. This solved the problem of my feet hitting the center speaker and having the ability to get even closer.
  • The tilt also creates an incredible sense of immersion and when you're sitting that close a 0 degree tilt means that the top of the TV is further away from you than the bottom - so the tilt creates an even picture. I was shocked when I played the IMAX preshow clip online that I got a similar feeling to a real IMAX. The same viewing angle on the projector results in the top of the picture being too high away form me.
  • When not watching movies I can push the TV flat to the wall to permit my roll down projection screen to fall down.
  • Visual queues are important, I didn't appreciate just how important a dark theater was to immersion. Even though the viewing angle is the same, soon as you put the lights on it takes a lot of that feeling away. I put my speaker grills back and cleared the trinkets off my sub and still use my black velvet curtains like with the projector - now on movie night the picture appears to be floating in mid air and with OLED blacks it's like perfect masking. It's actually better than the PJ because you always notice the screen on simultaneous bright/dark scenes.
  • I put my B&W 803s on rotating TV stands so I can point the tweeters to the correct seating position depending on distance I chose to sit at.
  • Auddssey App permits you to quickly upload different configs from your phone. I have one setup for various meters from the display devices

All in all I'm very happy with this approach and will be using my JVC much less frequently. Having infinite contrast on a percieved giant screen blows the JVC away.
g_bickle likes this.

Last edited by rxp91; 08-11-2017 at 02:31 AM.
rxp91 is offline  
post #72 of 75 Old 08-13-2017, 04:58 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by rxp91 View Post
Necro bump but relevant.

I love the immersion I get from my 120" and have been desperate to replicate it from a TV for various reasons (co-habiting now, not a dedicated theatre, OLED black, OLED 3D). I recently purchased a 65" C6 OLED.

My thoughts on it:
  • There's a good viewing angle calculator online: http://myhometheater.homestead.com/v...alculator.html
  • I knew from that calc that if I push my sofa to 1.3m in front of my screen the viewing angle would be identical to my 120"@ 2.5m.
  • My TV is wall mounted and I had issues sitting this close with a recliner sofa - my fat B&W HTM3s was getting in the way.
  • I purchased an articulating TV bracket that lets me push the TV back and forth by 20" and tilt 20 degrees down. This solved the problem of my feet hitting the center speaker and having the ability to get even closer.
  • The tilt also creates an incredible sense of immersion and when you're sitting that close a 0 degree tilt means that the top of the TV is further away from you than the bottom - so the tilt creates an even picture. I was shocked when I played the IMAX preshow clip online that I got a similar feeling to a real IMAX. The same viewing angle on the projector results in the top of the picture being too high away form me.
  • When not watching movies I can push the TV flat to the wall to permit my roll down projection screen to fall down.
  • Visual queues are important, I didn't appreciate just how important a dark theater was to immersion. Even though the viewing angle is the same, soon as you put the lights on it takes a lot of that feeling away. I put my speaker grills back and cleared the trinkets off my sub and still use my black velvet curtains like with the projector - now on movie night the picture appears to be floating in mid air and with OLED blacks it's like perfect masking. It's actually better than the PJ because you always notice the screen on simultaneous bright/dark scenes.
  • I put my B&W 803s on rotating TV stands so I can point the tweeters to the correct seating position depending on distance I chose to sit at.
  • Auddssey App permits you to quickly upload different configs from your phone. I have one setup for various meters from the display devices

All in all I'm very happy with this approach and will be using my JVC much less frequently. Having infinite contrast on a percieved giant screen blows the JVC away.
Ha!... I'm in the exact same situation as you. Went from a 120" Projector screen to a 65" C6. My Room is completely Blacked out (which I had done for the projector)

I assumed the blacking out wasn't going to be important for the TV and boy was I wrong. With the lights out and sitting a bit over 5 foot from the screen the level of immersion is superior to the projector. Also 2.35 Movies seem at least as immersive as 1.85 movies (It was the opposite with the projector).

I also have some bookshelf speakers that image nicely for near field listening and now I'm used to hearing the sounds coming out of the actors mouths. After a couple of months I watched a friends Projector and its so weird hearing the voices coming from a box under the screen instead of moving around from the actors mouths.

I can echo exactly your observations for everything. Watching floating credits get smaller to bigger gradually on that pure black screen floating in air was the moment I was sold. It was as if they were coming towards me and the illusion was better than 3D. Throw in that picture quality from a good 4K HDR on the OLED and I will never consider another projector. Watched an LS10000 and it seemed so flat in comparison (Your eyes get used to perfect black and it becomes normal so when you see a "high contrast" projector they look to me like a 1000:1 DLP used to look)

So to sum up yes a smaller screen can beat a bigger screen but only if its just one viewer. Room needs to be completely black with no reflections. It is more important than ever to disable Center speaker when sitting close and rely on the good soundstage/imaging of your speakers.

Also I realize you are also using a Curved OLED. Maybe sitting so close to a curved screen helps with this experience, as we are both having the same observations re immersion.

Last edited by g_bickle; 08-13-2017 at 05:03 PM.
g_bickle is offline  
post #73 of 75 Old 08-14-2017, 10:28 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 52
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 38 Post(s)
Liked: 14
Nice idea about the bookshelfs. I recently got a pair of KEF r300's and have been impressed with their imagining. Unfortunately it's difficult to angle such large speakers down 18-20 degrees like the TV. I don't find the center channel is much of an issue for me - I do sit at ear level to the tweeter though when reclined and look up at the screen which helps. But I'd really like to try out angled KEF R300's.

The curve certainly adds to the immersion. I saw Guardians of the Galaxy 1 in 3D last night and the IMAX scenes really blew me away. I can't get as close as I'd like due to the crosstalk but it's an identical viewing angle I get with the JVC which doesn't enable eShift in 3D so I have to sit a little further to avoid the pixel grid.

How far out are you sitting?

The only negative I've found is with the nature of perfect blacks you do notice compression artifacts far more. Game of Thrones is full of them.

I'm in a bit of a conundrum now with what display to watch movies on. Movies with good 3D the OLED is an easy choice - but for 2D releases like Dunkirk I'm not sure if I'll side with the OLED or PJ. The PJ still throws a fantastic image and with 4k e-shift you can't see the pixel grid at 1.5m. For a 2.35:1 scope movie the PJ is probably the choice because I can shift the lens down so the picture is at eye level. But for 16:9 the TV is better so the angle to the top of the picture is better.

Bring on the 75" OLED's at the 3-4k price range!
rxp91 is offline  
post #74 of 75 Old 08-15-2017, 05:09 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by rxp91 View Post
Nice idea about the bookshelfs. I recently got a pair of KEF r300's and have been impressed with their imagining. Unfortunately it's difficult to angle such large speakers down 18-20 degrees like the TV. I don't find the center channel is much of an issue for me - I do sit at ear level to the tweeter though when reclined and look up at the screen which helps. But I'd really like to try out angled KEF R300's.

The curve certainly adds to the immersion. I saw Guardians of the Galaxy 1 in 3D last night and the IMAX scenes really blew me away. I can't get as close as I'd like due to the crosstalk but it's an identical viewing angle I get with the JVC which doesn't enable eShift in 3D so I have to sit a little further to avoid the pixel grid.

How far out are you sitting?

The only negative I've found is with the nature of perfect blacks you do notice compression artifacts far more. Game of Thrones is full of them.

I'm in a bit of a conundrum now with what display to watch movies on. Movies with good 3D the OLED is an easy choice - but for 2D releases like Dunkirk I'm not sure if I'll side with the OLED or PJ. The PJ still throws a fantastic image and with 4k e-shift you can't see the pixel grid at 1.5m. For a 2.35:1 scope movie the PJ is probably the choice because I can shift the lens down so the picture is at eye level. But for 16:9 the TV is better so the angle to the top of the picture is better.

Bring on the 75" OLED's at the 3-4k price range!
I'm about 5-5.5 feet from the screen (bit closer for a quality 4k transfer and a bit further back some 1080 stuff and 3d) The problem with the 4k OLEDS (esp the 2016 ones) is they are so brutally honest (Like some high end speakers that make mediocre recordings unlistenable).

I was watching some Dolby Vision on Netflix and it looked sensational. The dark scenes were superb and so clean. Then you get Game of Thrones on Amazon and the artifacts in the dark scenes are horrific. So I just accept that (Yes a 1080p projector or plasma or makes that sort of stuff look better by hiding it more)

3D is not bad even from close. (I can put up with the bit of crosstalk rather than sit back) you do notice that its not getting the full 4k resolution of the panel though. Much prefer a nice HDR/Dolby Vision presentation. Id say I almost prefer a good projector with 3D. Some Blurays look nicer on a 1080 panel/projector too but thats just the OLED being too "honest".

I appreciate projectors, but I just kept nitpicking all their shortcomings after awhile (as I'm too fussy). I can put up with 65" for now and not keep thinking about what its not quite doing right (black level/ ANSI contrast etc etc). Next change will be an 85" or bigger OLED or other tech with perfect blacks and ANSI contrast.

I know what you mean about not sure which to watch for a Nice SDR movie... Projector might be more enjoyable... Problem is a nice UHD 4k Presentation on the OLED really starts showing up the shortcomings of a projector (even the JVCs). As you say bring on the big OLEDs and that will be the end of projectors. I considered at one stage 4 curved 55" OLEDs for a stunning 110" 8k virtual panel but they not borderless enough.

The KEFs you have image pretty well so you should give it a go disabling the center speaker. You may still prefer your center though but Im not going back.

Last edited by g_bickle; 08-15-2017 at 07:06 AM.
g_bickle is offline  
post #75 of 75 Old 09-19-2017, 12:45 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 52
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 38 Post(s)
Liked: 14
I had a go at running a virtual center - didn't like it. Could easily position the audio as not coming from a real center. I've grown up on surround systems and a center speaker since my dad got one back in 1993 so could just be personal preference. The Sony electrostatic solution would be interesting in this scenario. But wouldn't compare to a real 5.1

I also decided to do a A/B comparison last night - no question I prefer sitting close to the OLED. The biggest thing that hit me was that you really do miss the ANSI contrast. I used Gotham's Blu-ray as a test - in scenes where there's both dark and light on the screen the PJ really does look washed out even in a black velvet curtain batcave. I also realised I couldn't really sit very close to the PJ screen to even get the same viewing angle as the TV - because the screen has to be straight, when you sit and recline you have to look up. The angle is too obtuse. With the bracket I have I can tilt down 35 degrees so I sit "under" the TV almost.

One thing that struck me immediately was that the JVC's handling of 24p was way smoother. I increased the smooth motion from 0 to 1 on the OLED and got a very similar feel. No SOA and more JVC like motion.

I'll keep the projector for when people come over but I'm really happy I did this because i've saved myself a fortune in upgrading PJ's and the smart apps on the TV are so much easier to use. In reality it just means I have more to "invest" in my next TV purchase which will hopefully be a 75" OLED in 2020. That way I can sit a little further back and get the audio setup just right too. Makes a non dedicated room much easier to deal with when you switch lights on etc.

Last edited by rxp91; 09-19-2017 at 01:01 AM.
rxp91 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply Digital Hi-End Projectors - $3,000+ USD MSRP

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off