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post #1 of 17 Old 07-19-2014, 11:13 AM - Thread Starter
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How big can I project image?

I'd like to know how big I can project an image before losing image quality/significant brightness?

I have a Sony VPL-HW55 ES

I'd like to watch both 3d and 2d content (85% 2d). I'm planning on getting a 135" screen, would this be too big to maintain the quality I was talking about?

Any help appreciated!! Thanks
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post #2 of 17 Old 07-19-2014, 11:24 AM
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Hi, I have the Sony VPL-HW50 ES which is euqal in terms of brightness. In 2D 135'' is not a problem at all, you could go even bigger. However in 3D, the brightness behind the glasses drops significantly and I wouldn't recommend to go over 120'' max unless you go with a High Power (HP) screen. The manual also recommends max screen size for 3D to be 100'' to 120''. I hope this helps.
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post #3 of 17 Old 07-19-2014, 11:28 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Mustang84 View Post
Hi, I have the Sony VPL-HW50 ES which is euqal in terms of brightness. In 2D 135'' is not a problem at all, you could go even bigger. However in 3D, the brightness behind the glasses drops significantly and I wouldn't recommend to go over 120'' max unless you go with a High Power (HP) screen. The manual also recommends max screen size for 3D to be 100'' to 120''. I hope this helps.
Thanks for the reply

What are the disadvantages to having a High Power screen when watching 2d (if there are any)?
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post #4 of 17 Old 07-19-2014, 11:30 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Jesse Jhaj View Post
Thanks for the reply

What are the disadvantages to having a High Power screen when watching 2d (if there are any)?
Also, one quick note, the screen will mainly be used for the viewing pleasure of 2 people. Dead center viewing angle.
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post #5 of 17 Old 07-20-2014, 03:09 AM
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Originally Posted by Jesse Jhaj View Post
Also, one quick note, the screen will mainly be used for the viewing pleasure of 2 people. Dead center viewing angle.
You already mentioned the main disadvantage of High Power Screens: The only narrow viewing angle in which the 'High Power' is present. As I don't have a High Power Screen I cannot tell you more unfortunately.
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post #6 of 17 Old 07-20-2014, 06:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Jesse Jhaj View Post
Also, one quick note, the screen will mainly be used for the viewing pleasure of 2 people. Dead center viewing angle.
To get the gain from a high power screen, the projector lens has to be mounted close to seated head height. This type of setup does not work for most people. Ceiling mounted means, you will not get much if any gain from a high power screen.

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post #7 of 17 Old 07-21-2014, 10:58 AM
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^^ are all HP screens retroreflective? I thought some were designed for ceiling mounted projectors that weren't?
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post #8 of 17 Old 07-21-2014, 11:04 AM
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Originally Posted by fierce_gt View Post
^^ are all HP screens retroreflective? I thought some were designed for ceiling mounted projectors that weren't?
High Power refers to a specific material from Da-Lite. If you mean high gain, then yes, that's the case. There are some higher gain materials out there that are angular reflective. But the High Power material from Da-Lite only comes as one type of screen and they are all retroreflective and have the properties Mike is referring to.
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post #9 of 17 Old 07-21-2014, 05:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Seegs108 View Post
High Power refers to a specific material from Da-Lite. If you mean high gain, then yes, that's the case. There are some higher gain materials out there that are angular reflective. But the High Power material from Da-Lite only comes as one type of screen and they are all retroreflective and have the properties Mike is referring to.
figures, first time I succumb to peer pressure and say HP I get called out


yes, I mean high gain. seems everybody around here uses the terms synonymously so I did too or else nobody wants a high gain screen that isn't an HP? haha.
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post #10 of 17 Old 07-21-2014, 06:01 PM
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I wouldn't go as far to say that. I think you see people use the the acronym 'HP' because so many people use it. It's the go-to screen material if you want a high gain experience. The reasoning behind this has to do with how most high gain angular reflective screens get such high gain. The use of what seems like a profound amount of "sparkle" elements. I've seen the Ultramatte 150 and 200 from Stewart (can anyone say "holy-cow that's a lot of glitter?" ). Most companies don't sell screens past 1.3 gain for a reason. Unless you go retro-reflective most materials out there look ridiculous in terms of sparkles. There are, of course, a few exceptions to the rule. But like I said, I don't think those two terms are now synonymous with each other.
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post #11 of 17 Old 07-21-2014, 06:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse Jhaj View Post
I'd like to know how big I can project an image before losing image quality/significant brightness?

I have a Sony VPL-HW55 ES

I'd like to watch both 3d and 2d content (85% 2d). I'm planning on getting a 135" screen, would this be too big to maintain the quality I was talking about?

Any help appreciated!! Thanks
Perhaps the real question you should be asking is "How Big an Image Should I Project". The "ideal" screen size should be based primarily on the what your viewing distance will be. With a 1080p projector one common rule of thumb recommendation is to have a seating distance that is 1.5 times the screen width width. However, some people prefer sitting closer to the screen at perhaps 1.2 times the screen width.

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Last edited by Ron Jones; 07-21-2014 at 07:06 PM.
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post #12 of 17 Old 07-21-2014, 07:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Ron Jones View Post
Perhaps the real question you should be asking is "How Big an Image Should I Project". The "ideal" screen size should be based primarily on the what your viewing distance will be. With a 1080p projector one common rule of thumb recommendation is to have a seating distance that is 1.5 times the screen width width. However, some people prefer sitting closer to the screen at perhaps 1.2 times the screen width.
I think another rule-of-thumb is the screen shouldn't take up more than 75% of your screen wall.
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post #13 of 17 Old 07-22-2014, 12:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Seegs108 View Post
I wouldn't go as far to say that. I think you see people use the the acronym 'HP' because so many people use it. It's the go-to screen material if you want a high gain experience. The reasoning behind this has to do with how most high gain angular reflective screens get such high gain. The use of what seems like a profound amount of "sparkle" elements. I've seen the Ultramatte 150 and 200 from Stewart (can anyone say "holy-cow that's a lot of glitter?" ). Most companies don't sell screens past 1.3 gain for a reason. Unless you go retro-reflective most materials out there look ridiculous in terms of sparkles. There are, of course, a few exceptions to the rule. But like I said, I don't think those two terms are now synonymous with each other.
I didn't think so either, that's why I kind of laughed. this was literally the FIRST time I'd ever just said "HP"... I actually wasn't aware HP was a specific material though, so at least a learned something from it, haha. I always thought high power was just a marketing term they used to describe their high gain screens, and then it became like saying 'kleenex' instead of tissue.


so based on what you've just said, and what I've read ppl post, I'm going to assume is was option 2, and nobody's interested in high gain screens that aren't HP
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post #14 of 17 Old 07-22-2014, 12:14 AM
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Originally Posted by fierce_gt View Post
I didn't think so either, that's why I kind of laughed. this was literally the FIRST time I'd ever just said "HP"... I actually wasn't aware HP was a specific material though, so at least a learned something from it, haha. I always thought high power was just a marketing term they used to describe their high gain screens, and then it became like saying 'kleenex' instead of tissue.


so based on what you've just said, and what I've read ppl post, I'm going to assume is was option 2, and nobody's interested in high gain screens that aren't HP
There are a couple of materials out there that aren't half bad, but I think the retro-reflective high power material from Da-Lite gives you a LOT of gain with a livable amount of negative aspects when comparing to a unity gain screen. This is why so many people out there use it. Plus it's actually a very cheap material. There's high bang-for-the-buck with this material.
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post #15 of 17 Old 07-22-2014, 01:39 AM
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Originally Posted by Ron Jones View Post
Perhaps the real question you should be asking is "How Big an Image Should I Project". The "ideal" screen size should be based primarily on the what your viewing distance will be. With a 1080p projector one common rule of thumb recommendation is to have a seating distance that is 1.5 times the screen width width. However, some people prefer sitting closer to the screen at perhaps 1.2 times the screen width.
I like 0.8 the screen width. That puts the edges slightly in your peripheral where it's not as sharp as the center anyways. But not enough so to be uncomfortable. The experience is much more immersive too.
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post #16 of 17 Old 07-22-2014, 05:04 AM
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I like 0.8 the screen width. That puts the edges slightly in your peripheral where it's not as sharp as the center anyways. But not enough so to be uncomfortable. The experience is much more immersive too.

That's like viewing a 120" (diagonal) screen from just under 7 feet. How close to the front do you sit when going to a movie at the local movie theater (e.g., front 1/4)?

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post #17 of 17 Old 07-22-2014, 05:51 AM
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That's like viewing a 120" (diagonal) screen from just under 7 feet. How close to the front do you sit when going to a movie at the local movie theater (e.g., front 1/4)?
I don't go to the theater, haven't been in years. Less chance of getting shot.

I sat 103 inches from my 128 inch wide screen before my projector died.

My next projector needs to be 4k. A CRT shows no pixel structure whatsoever. Hopefully the Epson Eshift laser can go infinite black on a fade to black.

Maybe a CRT is different, but 800 peak lumens was fine with a screen that size.
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