Marantz VP11S2, Epson ProCinema1080UB, Sony VPL-VW40 Reviews. - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 24 Old 01-29-2008, 08:06 AM - Thread Starter
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NEW FORMAT NOTES:
As you read on, you will notice there is a new format to my reviews. The basic structure is the same where I will still write them as if I was “talking” to someone (many like this format as it makes these reviews a fun read). I will also still give my opinion on the overall performance of the particular piece of equipment, as well as information on the features, pricing, etc… In addition, I will post even more screenshots than before as many people just glance over the actual review part and go straight to those anyways. In fact because of this, I even procured a high end digital camera to really maximize the quality of the screenshots.

Now what you will no longer see is the measurement section. I know some of you will be disappointed, and some will not care one way or the other. I have done this for several reasons. First off, though I always put a disclaimer that my resulting numbers should not be considered as the “rule”, many people do take them to heart. Remember my room is not an ideal test environment, and every projector differs, as does the particular reviewers gear, technique, environment, etc… Because of this, the resulting numbers that I (and really any reviewer get), should only be taken with a grain of salt. Unfortunately this doesn’t always happen so I have decided to remove them completely. In their place, I will put specific aspects of the projector in “list” mode, and comment on what I see relative to other projectors I have played with. Let’s get to the review now!
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post #2 of 24 Old 01-29-2008, 08:08 AM - Thread Starter
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INTRO:
It seems that most reviews tend to be of projectors in the upper-end price spectrum. Unfortunately, there are a lot of great projectors that are set in the, well, more manageable price ranges, but they can often get passed up for reviews. So I decided to work on a couple of those to give some of my feedback. First on my list, the Epson ProCinema1080UB.

The ProCinema1080UB is Epson's latest 1920x1080 LCD projector. It utilizes the new D7 LCD panels, which are a breakthrough in their ability to reproduce very high contrast/low black levels. The PC1080UB claims as much as 50000:1 on/off contrast, as opposed to their previous non-UB model at 12000:1quite a change. Additionally, the UB version has an increased light output rating (from 1200 to 1600 lumens). The Epson is loaded with inputs, including 2 HDMI, a component, s-video, composite video and a VGA 15pin for computers and such. It also has RS2323 and a 12v trigger, so it can easily be interfaced with motorized screens, control systems, etc All this and more for a mere $3999 MSRP (not including the rebates they run frequently throughout the year).

The Epson arrived in 3 boxesthe projector, the spare lamp, and the mount. Oh, I forgot to mention thatthere are 2 versions of the EpsonHome and Pro. My review is about the Pro, but there are some differences between the two. The Pro is a black unit, vs. white for the Home. The Pro has a 3 year warranty, vs. 2 year for the Home. The Pro also comes with a free spare lamp and mount (as I mentioned), vs. the Home which does not. Lastly the Pro is ISF certified and has more abilities for adjustments. So moving on, I grabbed the projector and headed for my theater to start the testing. The unit is actually quite light, which is a welcome change for my back as so many of these things are crazy heavy. I opened the outer box and took out the projector. It comes in a single cardboard box, with cardboard inserts for locking it in place. The projector itself is doubled wrapped with a foam bag and a softer black cloth bag. This protects the fine black-pearlized finish nicely. I got it hooked up and started to play with it.





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post #3 of 24 Old 01-29-2008, 08:10 AM - Thread Starter
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The first thing I noticed is the remote. The remote is very well designed. The buttons are well laid out, and spread far enough apart that those with big fingers (like me) can reliably press the correct button when needed. In addition, the buttons are backlit, with an easy to find light on button for the bakclight. The remote is also ergonomically designed to fit into ones hand comfortably. There are discrete input, memory settings, and various other discrete controls so one doesn't always have to go into the menu to make quick adjustments.



The projector, as I mentioned, is nice and lightweight. But don't let that fool youby holding it you can feel how well put together it is (no flimsiness at all). So I set it onto my table and made my connections. The lens comes shipped with a yellow foam insert around the lens. This helps protect the lens from shipping jostles since it is a moveable lens. Specifically, the Epson has a large amount of lens shift, both vertically and horizontally. In fact, to my recollection it is the largest amount of shift I have come to find (+/- 96% vertically or +/-47% horizontally). Plus, the shift mechanism is solid. There are 2 thumb knobs for adjusting each direction, and they simply are rotated until the image is at the correct position. NOTE: I have found that often the image is NOT centered out of the box horizontally. In other words, when I set it up with the lens centered on the screen, the image often is off to one side. I am making note of this so those who get this unit aren't alarmed about it. So I positioned the image on my screen, adjusted the zoom and focus (manually done I should add) and started with the testing.
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post #4 of 24 Old 01-29-2008, 08:14 AM - Thread Starter
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First, I ran through the basic adjustments. The Epson menu pretty much has everything one would want. The main menu has the standards (brightness, contrast, basic color temp, etc…), and then there is an “Advanced Menu” where you find Gamma, Color Temp fine tuning, and Primary/Secondary (CMS) adjustments. Upon finishing the basic setup, I took my initial readings. I found that the color temperature is relatively good out of the box (when preset to 6500k in the main menu). My particular unit was close, but I have tested some other Epson’s that were near dead on. The primary/secondary colors were a bit oversaturated out of the box (which is not uncommon with projectors in general). Fortunately, for those who don’t like that, the CMS system in the Epson is extremely well done and gives the ability to dial it in just how one wants it. Of course, I’m a geek so I tweaked it to no end.  After a bit of adjustment, I was able to get the CT and main colors to near perfection. Ah…how sweet it is… I also should mention the fan is extremely quiet in Low Mode, and barely gets louder in Normal Mode. Moreover, I have to say when shut down, this thing has the absolute shortest shut down cycle (literally about 10 seconds, as opposed to most that can run 1-2 minutes). This isn’t really pertinent to anything, but I just found it interesting.

COLOR TEMP BEFORE:


COLOR TEMP AFTER:


PRIMARY/SECONDARY COLORS BEFORE:


PRIMARY/SECONDARY COLORS AFTER:


Now, there are many memory settings in the Epson ProCinema1080UB. This allows one to have different setups of all the adjustments, for each type of environment one might be using. For instance, if you have a room with ambient light during the day, you can have it setup to be at a slightly higher CT, boosting the light output, and then for evening have it at D65 for the maximum performance. Very slick, but let’s go onto my observations…
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post #5 of 24 Old 01-29-2008, 08:19 AM - Thread Starter
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OBSERVATIONS:
This is the fun partviewing an image. I got my BluRay player hooked up and gave it a go! Here is what I found:

Contrast: Simply put, the Epson ProCinema1080UB has the best black levels of any LCD I have viewed to date. I am not saying it is the absolute best as admittedly I have not seen them all, but from my experience it certainly is. The Epson does have an iris to help accomplish that. Some projectors have, well, clunky irises, but I found the Epson's was quite smooth and quick, so I didn't notice the change at all. The black levels actually rivaled that of some of the competing formats, such as DILA and SXRD. This is a breakthrough for LCD's. Now couple that with the great light output, and the Epson is able to achieve quite impressive contrast results.

Light Output: The Epson is rated at 1600 lumens. Now as usual, this isn't really true. I'll explain. The Epson is certainly capable of near that level results, but, not when ideally calibrated for dedicated HT use. When properly calibrated, the unit tests out at about 1/3 of that, rivaling most other projectors in its class. But, as mentioned before, if one has ambient light to contend with, in which case color temp isn't really an issue, the Epson can be set such that it puts out a lot of light to help combat that issue. All in all, this unit has more than enough light for the average HT.

Colors: I mentioned earlier that out of the box the colors were a bit oversaturated. Again, this is actually more the rule than the exception with projectors from what I find. But, you aren't stuck like that if you don't want to be. The CMS system in the ProCinema1080UB is quite good. I was easily able to dial that into near perfection (based on the HD709 standard). The colors were also very rich and not lacking in the least bit, which is a benefit for 3chip designs.

Sharpness: This is one of the hard things that LCD's have to reproduce. The nature of the LCD panel and how it is designed can make it more difficult to achieve clean sharpness (without adding too much edge enhancement). Part of this is due to the lens, and the convergence. The Epson does a stellar job at this. In fact, its ability to resolve detail is again, one of the best I have seen for LCD. The lens is very good in this projector, especially for the price point. I was able to find minimal CA on various test patterns and I was able to get the pixels to resolve almost completely. In addition, the convergence was very good on my test unit (not perfect as that is rare, but not enough off to cause a softening of the image either).
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post #6 of 24 Old 01-29-2008, 08:21 AM - Thread Starter
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And now what you really care about...

SCREENSHOTS:

Ratatouille (BluRay):





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post #7 of 24 Old 01-29-2008, 08:23 AM - Thread Starter
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Spiderman 3 (BluRay):






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post #8 of 24 Old 01-29-2008, 08:25 AM - Thread Starter
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CONCLUSION:
With projectors getting better and better, one would expect results like I have found with the Epson ProCinema1080UB. But the best part is that it accomplishes these kinds of results for a mere $3999, something that even as near as 2 years ago was near impossible. Technology will continue to improve as always, and with LCD technology already having the best price points to work from, I expect that we will continue to see great things in this class down the road. Epson has hit a home run with this projector and I am sure it will hold its own for quite some time.

Thanks!

NOTES:
After spending forever working on this and taking all the screenshots, I realized I have some moire in them. Doh! Anyways, I had already packed up the unit before I realized I had it so my apologies!
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post #9 of 24 Old 02-06-2008, 06:27 PM - Thread Starter
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NEW REVIEW FORMAT NOTES:
As you read on, you will notice there is a new format to my reviews. The basic structure is the same where I will still write them as if I was talking to someone (many like this format as it makes these reviews a fun read). I will also still give my opinion on the overall performance of the particular piece of equipment, as well as information on the features, pricing, etc In addition, I will post even more screenshots than before as many people just glance over the actual review part and go straight to those anyways. In fact because of this, I even procured a high end digital camera to really maximize the quality of the screenshots.

Now what you will no longer see is the measurement section. I know some of you will be disappointed, and some will not care one way or the other. I have done this for several reasons. First off, though I always put a disclaimer that my resulting numbers should not be considered as the rule, many people do take them to heart. Remember my room is not an ideal test environment, and every projector differs, as does the particular reviewers gear, technique, environment, etc Because of this, the resulting numbers that I (and really any reviewer get), should only be taken with a grain of salt. Unfortunately this doesn't always happen so I have decided to remove them completely. In their place, I will put specific aspects of the projector in list mode, and comment on what I see relative to other projectors I have played with. Let's get to the review now!
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post #10 of 24 Old 02-06-2008, 06:30 PM - Thread Starter
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INTRO:
So for the heck of it, the other day I felt like trying something new. Perusing the AVSForum, I stumbled across the Marantz VP11S2 thread. Then I remembered that they did not demo it at Cedia, rather they only showed the VP15S1. The VP15S1 was quite impressive at the show, and I found the same thing when I did my review on it. So I thought what the hecklet's see what improvements the VP11S2 might have. Well, enough to make me smile ear to ear.

The VP11S2 is Marantz's flagship $14995 projector. It is the first DC4 single chip (and of the time of this write-up, the only one), which is TI's new 1920x1080 chip that is capable of much higher contrast levels than previous generations. The projector has a full range of inputs, including 2 HDMI 1.3, 2 Component, VGA, Composite and S-Video. It also has 2 assignable 12v triggers, a direct IR input as well as an RS232 for control system integration. Marantz puts a lot into the quality of their product, not only for the picture, but physically as well. It has a steel framed support internally to minimize vibrations, Konica-Minolta lenses, hand-picked optics, hand-picked DLP chips, etc When you pay for an expensive projector like this, one should expect a company to put this level of detail into all aspectsand they certainly do. In addition, the VP11S2 has the latest generation Gennum VXP video processor, which in and of itself is a huge advantage.

The VP11S2 arrived the other day. Unfortunately it sat there, taunting me as I look at the box next to my desk. I have been busy lately so finding spare time to do a review can be a tough one. There it satcalling my nameJason, come try me out, you won't be disappointed. The suspense was killing me, so I decided to bolt out early for the day, VP11S2 in tote, and headed to my showroom for some quality one on one time.

The first thing one will notice is the size and heft of the box. It weighs just over 42lbs in all, and is quite large. The box looks quite similar to the one the VP15S1 comes in. In fact, other than the part number label I believe they are identical. Upon opening the box, I found a second box (which by now you all know I love double boxing), then a soft foam top layer, and then the Styrofoam protectors holding the projector. Yupsame basic packaging design as the VP15S1 (which is great, because it is of the best packed I have ever seen). Oh, after you take out the projector, there is a large foam base as well, with a cardboard insert that holds the accessories. So I got the unit all setup on my test table and went to town.




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post #11 of 24 Old 02-06-2008, 06:32 PM - Thread Starter
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The remote control is the same as the VP15S1. It is well laid out, and there is a small switch on the side (set apart from others) that turns on the back light, making it easier to see things in a dark room. The remote is full function, covering virtually all aspects of the units controls. This makes it easier to quickly access the controls when a change is needed. The buttons are a tad small for my large fingers, but the way they are laid out I rarely if ever had an issue hitting a wrong button.





Anyways, I plugged in my test pattern generator and started the tweaks. The menu is well laid out on the VP11S2. It is easy to navigate and find the necessary controls. Of course it has the standard adjustments, such as brightness, contrast, etc In addition, it has dual lamp levels, 3 iris settings (this is not a DI, but rather a static iris designed to either maximize light output or contrast), and 5 color temp settings (note they don't label them by actual temp, but rather 1-5I found 2 tracked the closest to D65). I should mention there are also several gamma settings, and the VP11S2 has tons of memory settings such that a person can setup different memories for different sourcesvery slick. So first I ran the basic settings and found that the defaults (0) for the most part needed adjustment. Next, I went into the second menu page and did the grayscale adjustments. As mentioned earlier, 2 was the closest out of the box (see graph below). I did have to fine tune it though, and was able to get it to track much better (not perfect, but closer than out of the box). The VP11S2 does not have any CMS system, and the red/green colors are a bit oversaturated, but I didn't find that they were too distracting (more on that later). Now I was done with the work, time to play!
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post #12 of 24 Old 02-06-2008, 06:41 PM - Thread Starter
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OBSERVATIONS:
I hooked up my HD-DVD and BluRay players, and started to feed some source material. Here is what I found:

Contrast/Black Levels: I have seen about every DLP made, and I can say with 100% truth that this has the BEST black levels on a DLP I have seen to date. In fact, they were so good, I would compare them directly to levels accomplish by some of the LCOS based machines (note I did my testing with Iris 1most closed). Now I know the DC4 is helping a great deal with this, but I don't think that is the only thing going on, so I suspect that Marantz has some other tricks up their sleeves. Whatever, I don't care, it works! Now, because of the extremely good black levels, the VP11S2 easily has the highest on/off contrast I have seen on a DLP as well. In fact it is the only one that achieved greater than 10000:1 (a good amount greater)! I think I need one of these.

Light Output: The VP11S2 is rated at 1000 lumens. Now we all know rarely do the manufacturers ratings achieve what they claim when properly calibrated. Well, this came darn close let's just say (when set to max light outputIris 3, Normal Lamp). Likely most people would not want to run it full open most the time as that will drop the contrast. But, I found that even at Iris 1, there was still sufficient light to fill my screen (at least with a fresh lamp). With the 3 iris settings, the end user can really set it up on the fly for different viewing environments/sources. This was very impressive.

Colors: As I mentioned before, the VP11S2 was a bit oversaturated with no CMS to adjust that. I don't feel this is a downfall by any means, but for those who want perfection in this aspect, you may need to look elsewhere, OR grab a video processor that has a CMS system built in. With that combo, you would be looking at pure beauty. Fortunately, even with the slight oversaturation, the dynamic contrast kept the colors vibrant and poppy, giving a really 3d look to the image.

Sharpness: Yes. Yes it is sharp. In fact, super sharp. I was able to easily resolve every pixel with extreme detail on the edges (when viewed super close up). Moreover, the Konica-Minolta lens is so high-grade, that there was virtually no CA at all. This further added to the ultra-detailed images. This is one of the reasons I really love DLP's. For me personally, I just love the razor sharp detail on movies, and especially live TV.

Color Temp Before Calibration:


Color Temp After Calibration:


Primary/Secondary Colors:
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post #13 of 24 Old 02-06-2008, 06:43 PM - Thread Starter
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Enough of that...SCREENSHOTS!!!

Batman (HD-DVD):







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post #14 of 24 Old 02-06-2008, 06:45 PM - Thread Starter
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Surf's Up (BluRay):





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post #15 of 24 Old 02-06-2008, 06:45 PM - Thread Starter
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CONCLUSIONS:
I really hate to play favorites and generally I am very good at avoiding it. But I do have to admit the Marantz VP11S2 is one of the best projectors I have seen to date. Though this projector is in the higher end of the price spectrum, I would still have no problem recommending it for anyone who has the means. I would caution everyone that if you have the ability to see one of these in your area, and you don't really want to spend the money, leave your checkbook at home; you will not be able to resist.

Thanks!
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post #16 of 24 Old 02-12-2008, 08:41 PM - Thread Starter
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NEW REVIEW FORMAT NOTES:
As you read on, you will notice there is a new format to my reviews. The basic structure is the same where I will still write them as if I was talking to someone (many like this format as it makes these reviews a fun read). I will also still give my opinion on the overall performance of the particular piece of equipment, as well as information on the features, pricing, etc In addition, I will post even more screenshots than before as many people just glance over the actual review part and go straight to those anyways. In fact because of this, I even procured a high end digital camera to really maximize the quality of the screenshots.
Now what you will no longer see is the measurement section. I know some of you will be disappointed, and some will not care one way or the other. I have done this for several reasons. First off, though I always put a disclaimer that my resulting numbers should not be considered as the rule, many people do take them to heart. Remember my room is not an ideal test environment, and every projector differs, as does the particular reviewers gear, technique, environment, etc Because of this, the resulting numbers that I (and really any reviewer get), should only be taken with a grain of salt. Unfortunately this doesn't always happen so I have decided to remove them completely. In their place, I will put specific aspects of the projector in list mode, and comment on what I see relative to other projectors I have played with. Let's get to the review now!
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post #17 of 24 Old 02-12-2008, 08:43 PM - Thread Starter
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INTRO:
Just when I thought there was a break in the storm, I quickly realized I was merely in the eye and the second wave was coming. Enter the Sony VPL-VW40. This is a revolutionary projector…not for the performance necessarily, but more so for the performance to price ratio. The VPL-VW40 retails for $3499, and yes, it is a native 1920x1080 SXRD projector. Much like its bigger brother (VPL-VW60 “Black Pearl”), the VPL-VW40 offers a high level of contrast (utilizing a dynamic iris), great light output, and a fully adjustable menu system, allowing one to tweak it to their liking. Like its bigger brother, it has a full range of inputs, including 2 HDMI, VGA (15 pin), component, s-video, and composite video. In addition, it has RS232 for automation control (such as a Crestron/AMX). The lens has the same throw as the Black Pearl (1.4-2.4x), and also has motorized focus, zoom and vertical lens shift (horizontal can be done with a manual system). One thing that has changed on this unit, is the color. It is now more of a white color, with a slight pearlized look (not nearly that of the VW50 or VW60). This may also make it more appealing for multipurpose rooms. But enough of that, let’s get started.

So I am perusing the forum last week, reading about the VPL-VW40 interest thread. Though I unfortunately couldn’t attend CES, I did hear about this unit. I was getting a good amount of inquiries on it as well, so I figured “why not”…and I ordered one in to check over. Fast forward to today, and I am sitting in the office plugging away, and then UPS shows up. I poke my head out of my office and low and behold…the VPL-VW40. Great…more fun! Though I wanted to head out of the office and get started, I did not have the time, so it was going to have to wait until the evening. Soon enough, I was on my way home, Sony in hand.

The first thing you will notice is that it is in a good sized, heavy duty box. Though it is not double boxed, the cardboard they use is quite rigid, making it much better suited for shipment. Inside, there is a cardboard insert which holds the manual, a CD, and warranty card. Removing that, you will see the foam protectors for the projector (which also hold the power cord, remote and batteries). The foam is form-fitted to the projector, so it is solid inside and does not move. I took out the projector and removed the soft foam bag it was further inside (for additional protection), and got it setup.





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post #18 of 24 Old 02-12-2008, 08:46 PM - Thread Starter
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The remote control is identical to the Black Pearl’s (which I reviewed as well), so I won’t go into it too much. It is well laid out, and backlit (although the button to light it can prove difficult to hit in darkness). You have full control of virtually all features, so one can make quick adjustments as needed. It is well sized and comfortable in the hand.

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post #19 of 24 Old 02-12-2008, 08:49 PM - Thread Starter
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First step, plug it in obviously. I hooked up my test pattern generator and fired up and image. As I ran through the standard adjustments (brightness, contrast, etc), I actually found that the VPL-VW40 is more accurately adjusted out of the box, as compared to the VW60. I did have to adjust slightly, but very slightly which is nice (usually projectors out of the box require tons of work). I then ran my initial measurements. I found that grayscale (set to LOW), was WAY off. Hmmmstrange. This is something I didn't notice on the VPL-VW60those are typically really close to D65. Oh well, that can be fixed. I then measured the primary/secondary colors.better than the VW60 out of the box. I have no idea why this is, but far be it from me to question. I then went into some other test patterns to check on common issueswhat I found was that convergence was near perfect on this particular piece (which is good because unlike the VW60, there is no adjustment for it). I also checked uniformitythis was not perfect (as none of this technology are), but perfectly acceptable. I also checked for bright cornersthis was about average. They were present, but only really became bothersome in a super dark, and relatively plain background (highly detailed images made it all but disappear), so I didn't find them distracting. Overall, this was a very good sample piece so I moved on.

I now calibrated the needed items, and was able to get excellent results.
The grayscale tracked nearly perfect to D65 (there was a small drop off in the lowest IRE's, but that can be accounted for by my probe sensitivity). The colors also were able to be made near perfect (this is much like the VW60, and better than last year's VW50 where the colors could not be dialed in all the way). You can see the before and after graphs below. Enough about the setup, let's get on to the images!

Color Temp Before:


Color Temp After:


Primary/Secondary Colors Before:


Primary/Secondary Colors After:
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post #20 of 24 Old 02-12-2008, 08:51 PM - Thread Starter
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OBSERVATIONS:
I setup my BluRay and HD-DVD, and started to observe

Contrast/Black Levels: The VPL-VW40 is really designed to compete with similar LCD projectors, more so than other LCOS based units. Well I can say it does that well. In fact, the black levels were a good amount better than any competing LCD I have seen to date. In addition, the contrast was substantially higher (even higher than the VW50 from last year). This is definitely a plus of the SXRD technology. Of course it relies on the dynamic iris to maximize this, but I found that the iris was very quick, and did not adversely affect the image. I did test the contrast with the iris off, and it was very good, but I think most would use it while on.

Light Output: So many projectors have exaggerated specs when it comes to light output. The problem is that when properly calibrated, the true light output is nowhere near the rated level. The Sony VPL-VW40's light output was quite good as compared to its rated specs (after calibration). In a nutshell, the projector rivals that of the VPL-VW60, making its light output towards the higher end of current models. This means that even after adjustment, the end user will still have enough juice for a decent sized screen. I would not classify this as a light cannon, but it will certainly get the job done in most applications (especially if paired with the proper screen).

Colors: Funny enough, the VPL-VW40 had the best out-of-the-box colors of any Sony I have measured. Strange how that happens, but I am not complaining-it makes my job easier. After I did the adjustments, the colors were spot on. This translated to the picture as well. The colors were all natural, yet maintained excellent depth and richness. I found that this was nearly the same result with the VPL-W60.

Sharpness: I find that in the lower range of the price spectrum, this can be a major problem. The lens is ultimately one of the most expensive single pieces in a projector. Because of this, many of the lower priced projectors sacrifice the quality of the lens, in order to meet a price point. A simple test of this is seeing how well one can resolve the pixel structure, and further seeing how much chromatic aberration there is. Well the VPL-VW40 was quite good in this regard. I was easily able to see all the pixel outlines clearly, and there was very little CA to speak of (every lens has some). In fact this lens is better than any LCD I have seen to date, and this definitely translates to the image. I had extremely sharp and detail edges in the image, and it didn't have the softer look that many others have. This was one of the parts I liked best about the VPL-VW40.
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post #21 of 24 Old 02-12-2008, 08:52 PM - Thread Starter
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Now for the fun part...screenshots!

The Bourne Ultimatum (HD-DVD):






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post #22 of 24 Old 02-12-2008, 08:54 PM - Thread Starter
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The Game Plan (BluRay):




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post #23 of 24 Old 02-12-2008, 08:56 PM - Thread Starter
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Underdog (BluRay):






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post #24 of 24 Old 02-12-2008, 08:57 PM - Thread Starter
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CONCLUSIONS:
Sony has always been recognized as a leader in the electronics industry. They have made projectors for years, and each year brings better and better levels of performance. They were the first to bring a 1080p native projector to the market for the under $10,000 range, and then the first to bring another 1080p model in the under $5,000 range. They have continued improving upon their products, and the VPL-VW40 is no exception. With this unit, they have made a stand in the under $3,500 category, which until recently was limited primarily to LCD projectors. Anyone who is looking for a high bang-for-the-buck unit, but do not want to sacrifice performance, the VPL-VW40 is something I would highly recommend looking at.

Thanks!
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Closed Thread Digital Hi-End Projectors - $3,000+ USD MSRP

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