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post #1 of 510 Old 05-14-2008, 06:56 AM - Thread Starter
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LG, Samsung Team Up on Mobile DTV

Korean Firms Agree to Propose One System for ATSC Standard

By Glen Dickson -- Broadcasting & Cable

Korean electronics giants LG Electronics and Samsung announced Wednesday that instead of proposing competing mobile-digital-television systems to the Advanced Television Systems Committee, the U.S. standard-setting body, they are teaming up to propose their jointly developed technology as the North American technology standard for mobile DTV.

The agreement was formally announced Wednesday at a signing ceremony at Seoul Plaza Hotel in Seoul, Korea, by Woo Paik, LG's president and chief technology officer, and Jong Woo Park, president of Samsung digital-media business.

It comes just one day before the Open Mobile Video Coalition -- a collection of some 800 local stations that has been promoting the development of a U.S. mobile-DTV standard -- is due to submit its findings to the ATSC on field trials in San Francisco and Las Vegas of three mobile-DTV-transmission systems: MPH, the system proposed by LG and Harris; A-VSB, the system developed by Samsung, Rohde & Schwarz and Nokia; and a third system from Thomson/Micronas.

At the ATSC meeting last week, Mark Aitken, a Sinclair vice president and head of the technical working group within ATSC that is leading the mobile-DTV-standard process, said the ATSC was on schedule to make a decision on the physical layer, or transmission system, for mobile DTV by mid-June. That most likely would have made either LG or Samsung the winner in the mobile-DTV-standards race, although theoretically, the Thomson/Micronas system is still in the running.

LG and Samsung are already world-class in digital TV and mobile communications, Paik said in a statement. Through this collaboration, we also have an opportunity to lead the North American mobile-DTV market.

The surprise deal eliminates the possibility of either LG or Samsung suffering a major loss to its Korean rival in the mobile-DTV\\-standards race, which seemed likely. Privately, ATSC members have suggested that one system was emerging to be clearly superior, although they wouldn't identify which one. What is known is that the LG/Harris MPH system can deliver a single mobile stream at a slightly lower data rate than A-VSB -- an important consideration to broadcasters looking to juggle mobile TV with HD and standard-definition services.

Our collaboration on North American mobile-DTV standardization will help to accelerate the ATSC standardization of mobile-TV technology, which will benefit both consumers and broadcasters, Park said in a statement.

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post #2 of 510 Old 05-16-2008, 09:30 PM - Thread Starter
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From Broadcast Engineering

May 16, 2008

Harris to support new joint LG-Samsung proposal for mobile DTV standard

Harris has committed to introduce a mobile digital TV transmission platform in November that adheres to a new Advanced Television Systems Committee (ATSC) solution proposed by LG Electronics and Samsung.

Reaching a mobile digital television standard is of keen interest to hundreds of broadcasters, represented by the Open Mobile Video Coalition (OMVC), looking to maximize the revenue potential of their digital spectrum. To date, Harris and LG Electronics have backed a jointly developed Mobile-Handheld-Portable (MPH) system, and Samsung and Rohde & Schwarz have backed the A-VSB system. A third competitive system, developed by Thomson and Micronas, has emerged, and all three have been undergoing evaluation in field trials conducted by the OMVC. No comment has yet been made by Thomson on the Harris announcement.

On May 14, the management of LG Electronics and Samsung signed an agreement in Seoul, South Korea, to jointly propose a mobile digital television standard for North America.

The proposed LG-Samsung mobile handheld solution is based upon elements of the Mobile-Pedestrian-Handheld (MPH) technology — developed by Harris, LG Electronics and Zenith — as well as the Samsung/Rohde & Schwarz Advanced Vestigial Sideband (A-VSB) system.

As of yet, no one from Rohde & Schwarz was available for comment. However, at NAB2008 during an interview with Broadcast Engineering, Eddy Vanderkerken, director of sales and marketing for Rohde & Schwarz broadcast products, was asked what the company would do if the standard adopted by the ATSC for mobile digital television was not A-VSB. “There is no way for Rohde & Schwarz, in that case, to just abandon the market. That is not the model we work with,” he said. “The model has been that we support and we supply for the world’s market. That means all standards…. Should the standard be decided to be another system than ours, we will absolutely adapt to that….”

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post #3 of 510 Old 05-17-2008, 06:32 AM
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This could be a big deal for ATSC, but it would hinge on how much of the DTV bandwidth would need to be devoted to "mobile" in order to make the system a commercial success.

ATSC was always bashed as not being able to do mobile, while the competing DVB standard has been traditionally seen as more mobile friendly/capable. With the end of DTV transistion in sight, it remains to bee seen how well this will play out with the other mobile competitors on adjacent spectrum.

I wonder, however, what the level of interest will be in this system on a forum such as this (at least at first.) Of course, with Ken's posts you can say "You heard it here first."
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post #4 of 510 Old 05-18-2008, 09:40 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hphase View Post

This could be a big deal for ATSC, but it would hinge on how much of the DTV bandwidth would need to be devoted to "mobile" in order to make the system a commercial success.

ATSC was always bashed as not being able to do mobile, while the competing DVB standard has been traditionally seen as more mobile friendly/capable. With the end of DTV transistion in sight, it remains to bee seen how well this will play out with the other mobile competitors on adjacent spectrum.

I wonder, however, what the level of interest will be in this system on a forum such as this (at least at first.) Of course, with Ken's posts you can say "You heard it here first."

Well, I'm interested in it, for two reasons. One, as expected, is the effect on HDTV. The other, perhaps not so obvious, is I really like the idea of mobile digital TV. I think it can be a big money maker for local stations, providing reception on dedicated reception devices and combo devices like cell phones, music players, PDA's, etc. This will be an entirely new market for ads to be sold into, and the sales department should be chomping at the bit.

I just wonder how much bandwidth is needed? For most mobile applications, I would think not a lot, due to small displays (on mobile reception devices)?

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post #5 of 510 Old 05-21-2008, 02:44 PM
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Quote:


Well, I'm interested in it, for two reasons. One, as expected, is the effect on HDTV. The other, perhaps not so obvious, is I really like the idea of mobile digital TV.

Same here.

Everything I've read so far seems to suggest they'll use MPEG4(AVC) video encoding for the mobile services. And, with the extra bandwidth required (for FEC/etc) for more robust reception/etc, also, everything I've read about it so far seems to suggest we're probably talking around the mobile TV service using about the same bandwidth from the 19.39Mb/s available as a MPEG2 SD multicast subchannel does for the current fixed service ... with the PSIP+audio stream, Perhaps leaving about 15Mb/s or so for the HD video stream via MPEG2 .. (if the station isn't doing any additional SD multicasting to fixed receivers) ...

some comments on that here from the masked engineer :

http://www.tvtech.com/pages/s.0081/t.12874.html

Maybe they can do it a little more efficiently, though. Looking foward to hearing about the details the ATSC white paper that should eventually be on ATSC site, that will describe the new standard .....

I do notice several Sinclair stations in my area allocating about 15Mb/s to their 720p HD services aren't multicasting(and haven't been for a while), and are running with around 3~4Mb/s in their Null packet streams .... Has occured to me over the past year or so, these stations in my area might especially be a perfect "place" for the Mobile DTV services ...

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post #6 of 510 Old 05-22-2008, 09:40 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nitewatchman View Post

I do notice several Sinclair stations in my area allocating about 15Mb/s to their 720p HD services aren't multicasting(and haven't been for a while), and are running with around 3~4Mb/s in their Null packet streams .... Has occured to me over the past year or so, these stations in my area might especially be a perfect "place" for the Mobile DTV services ...

Let's see, who could answer this question......

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post #7 of 510 Old 05-23-2008, 05:42 PM
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MisterDTV still around ? Haven't seem him post here in quite a while ...

Of course, even if he couldn't comment on SBG's Mobile DTV plans, allways enjoy reading Mark's posts ....

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post #8 of 510 Old 06-26-2008, 06:58 PM
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Recently came across this interesting article about Mobile DTV I thought others here might also be interested in reading :

http://www.tvtechnology.com/pages/s.0082/t.13933.html

Concerning the latter portion of article, I personally think some of it is a little on the "overly-optimsitic" side so to speak ...

What really caught my eye though in the article, was something I had been wondering about. That is, the article reports reception of these Mobile DTV services may be possible with signals as low as about 4dB S/N ..... Compare to ~15dB S/N for our current "fixed" DTV service for threshold DTV reception ....

IF so, I wonder what implications may be involved Given FCC rules regarding interference protection among stations service areas/etc. are based upon a ~16db SNR Threshold for DTV reception.

Granted, I realize the mobile DTV services will likely primarly be intended for reception on small handheld devices with small, low gain antennas, such that interference from a somewhat-distant co-channel station would be less likely vs. fringe reception via outdoor, hi-gain receive antenna.

Still, it seems to me this 12dB difference is substantial enough that there could be some issues regarding the Mobile DTV reception involving interference among (particuarly co-channel) stations in a given area ... And, hopefully there will also be fixed receivers with external antenna connections available which will support decoding the mobile DTV services, as it seems to me, for those in difficult fixed reception conditions, where(or when) the "conventional" Fixed services can't be received, reception of the more robust Mobile DTV service may be useful ...

As an occasional TV/DTV Dx'er, given the reportedly low SNR needed for reception, I'm particuarly interested in "fixed" distant reception(when band conditions allow) of the Mobile DTV services

------------------

I had originally read the article at link above several weeks ago, but had lost the URL for it -- In digging it back up for a converstion on another thread, I also ran into this interesting article about Mobile DTV from about a year ago :

http://www.tvtechnology.com/pages/s.0001/t.7729.html

In it, the author mentions the possibility of using existing ATSC capture cards/USB tuners for PC's along with certian software to "work" for capturing/reassembling/decoding streams/file based content via a ATSC based File Transmission system Triveni was working on.

Given the way such Capture cards/USB "stick" tuners work, per what little I understand of M/H/ Mobile DTV so far - I'm wondering if these existing PC based ATSC receivers could also work/support the Mobile DTV services with some additional software ? ....

Jeff
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post #9 of 510 Old 11-11-2008, 03:48 PM - Thread Starter
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From Broadcast Engineering

ION Media Networks deems mobile DTV tests successful

ION Media Networks reported Nov. 10 that it had conducted two successful mobile DTV field trial demonstrations — one from WCPX, the ION station serving Chicago, and the other from KPXC, the group’s station serving Denver.

The field trials used new mobile DTV technology that will enable TV broadcasters to deliver live, over-the-air digital television to next-generation mobile devices, including battery-powered digital televisions, cell phones, laptops and personal media players. The transmission occupied a portion of the same 6MHz channel bandwidth broadcasters are using to carry DTV and HDTV transmissions.

WCPX, transmitting from atop the Sears Tower, and KPXC, reaching Denver from a Fort Lupton-based tower, are broadcasting two mobile DTV programs simultaneously, in addition to the multicast of four programs already transmitted, within their 6MHz channel. ION Media used handheld mobile phones, laptops fitted with USB receivers and screens installed in traveling test vans throughout the downtown areas, surrounding suburbs and rural regions. The trials demonstrated successful program reception in pedestrian locations as well as at highway speeds in the nation’s third and 18th largest media markets.

The Open Mobile Video Coalition applauded the tests. At the manufacturer level, LG Electronics and Samsung agreed in May 2008 to jointly support a single common standard for mobile/handheld digital TV broadcasting. The emerging Advanced Television Systems Committee mobile DTV standard, which enables DTV services to mobile and handheld devices, is moving ahead rapidly and is expected to be finalized in 2009.

For the Chicago and Denver trials, LG Electronics, Harris and Zenith provided mobile TV receivers, transmission equipment and technical expertise to ION Media.

ION Media’s WCPX and KPXC broadcast in multicast SD, which is compatible with multiple broadcast strategies, including mobile DTV. Their signals carry varied programming, including a digital feed of ION Television, a contemporary general entertainment network featuring a mix of TV series, theatrical and made-for-television movies and specials; qubo, a digital television and multimedia network that offers programming for children focused on promoting positive values and literacy; and ION Life, a digital network dedicated to active lifestyles and personal growth.

For more information, visit www.ionmedia.com.

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post #10 of 510 Old 11-18-2008, 08:43 PM
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I'd like to see a Tsreader HTML output file from when a station has been testing M/H ...

While I'm thinking Tsreader would be able/probably would not recognize the M/H streams, or indicate anything specific to the M/H streams, I'd like to see what, if any changes might be detectable ... I'm guessing perhaps the "Mux. bitrate" info might not show ~19.39Mb/s as it does for any DTV stations I've seen/ stations not using M/H, rather than say, the "bits' for the M/H stream shown in the Null packet stream, or some other stream with a specific PID (such as a datacast stream/etc) ...

So, IF anyone has managed to snag one, please post, and thanks ...

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post #11 of 510 Old 11-26-2008, 09:45 AM - Thread Starter
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ATSC Approves Preliminary Mobile DTV Standard

Final standard for mobile broadcasting expected in mid-2009

By Glen Dickson -- Broadcasting & Cable

As expected, the Advanced Television Systems Committee (ATSC) has approved a proposed system that would allow DTV stations to broadcast to cell phones and other portable devices as a “candidate standard,” with a final ATSC standard expected in the second or third quarter of next year.

While minor tweaks are possible before it becomes a final ATSC standard, the candidate standard announced today means that the major technology choices for a mobile DTV system have been made, and vendors can start building devices based on those specifications. The candidate ATSC-Mobile/Handheld (M/H) standard is based on the MPH (Mobile Pedestrian Handheld) mobile DTV transmission system jointly developed by consumer electronics giant LG Electronics and transmitter manufacturer Harris Broadcast. It is also now supported by Samsung, which had previously pushed its own mobile DTV system.

By using a new digital exciter that is backward-compatible with the existing 8-VSB (vestigial sideband) transmission system currently used for DTV, ATSC-M/H will allow a mobile DTV stream to be broadcast within a station's digital channel without interfering with existing standard- or high-definition program services. The cost to implement mobile DTV is relatively low, running $250,000 or less per station for the new exciter and supporting encoders and multiplexing gear.

Through application software specifications, the candidate standard also includes support for new interactive TV applications, such as audience voting, through an optional Internet connection on the mobile receiver. It will also allow stations to deploy new data broadcasting services such as providing real-time navigation data for in-vehicle use and providing news and sports highlights in on-demand form to consumers.

"ATSC Mobile DTV will allow broadcasters to leverage the wireless and local nature of their DTV transmission" said ATSC President Mark Richer in a statement. "Broadcasters will be able to provide new compelling services to consumers utilizing a wide array of wireless receiving devices including mobile phones, small handheld TVs, laptop computers and in-vehicle entertainment systems. Many of these devices will utilize existing ubiquitous technologies to provide a return channel for true interactive applications.”

The ATSC-M/H candidate standard is expected to be implemented in prototype receiver devices in order to provide technical feedback over the coming months. Some of the new capabilities of mobile DTV are also likely to be demonstrated at the CES show in Las Vegas in January, both by handset manufacturers and members of the Open Mobile Video Coalition, a consortium of some 800 local stations that has been driving the mobile DTV standards process.

"This new Candidate Standard will enable broadcasters to launch services and will also allow device manufacturers to move forward with product development to ensure this emerging industry will have a successful commercial deployment in 2009,” said Brandon Burgess, President of the Open Mobile Video Coalition (OMVC) and ION Media Networks Chairman and CEO, in a statement.

The ATSC Specialist Group on Mobile & Handheld, chaired by Mark Aitken, Director of Advanced Technology for the Sinclair Broadcast Group, evaluated the initial mobile DTV proposals and drafted the standard. The ATSC Technology & Standards Group, chaired by John Henderson, consultant to the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA), approved elevation of the document to Candidate Standard after a six-week ballot.

As previously reported by B&C, the ATSC-M/H candidate standard incorporates established video, audio and data technologies, such as IP-based transport, MPEG AVC (H.264) video compression and HE AAC v2 audio (ISO/IEC 14496-3) coding. It consists of eight parts that together form a complete specification for a broadcast digital television signal that can deliver live television service, data and interactivity to new mobile and handheld receivers, while maintaining backward compatibility with existing DTV receivers. They are:

Part 1 – Mobile/Handheld Digital Television System
Part 2 – RF/Transmission System Characteristics
Part 3 – Service Multiplex and Transport Subsystem Characteristics
Part 4 – Announcement
Part 5 – Presentation Framework
Part 6 – Service Protection
Part 7 – Video System Characteristics
Part 8 – Audio System Characteristics

"The combination of live television and interactive capabilities on mobile and handheld devices is an essential element for the future success of over the air digital television," said Glenn Reitmeier, Chairman of the ATSC Board of Directors, in a statement. "Our efforts to develop ATSC Mobile DTV are a part of a strategy to provide the broadcast industry with the technical ability to deliver content to consumers on the move. The architecture of the Candidate Standard will make terrestrial broadcasting an important segment of the Internet."

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post #12 of 510 Old 12-04-2008, 07:10 AM
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Ah...Good reading, Ken. This answers many questions I had. I thought about "mobile" DTV ever since the early days of DTV. I guess "HD" mobile is out for this new standard, although not many mobile units will have a 50" LCD monitor onboard, I would imagine some land yachts will. Even limos will have some sort of HD monitor in them, no? I can see a "dual mode" mobile receiver being developed (stationary and mobile modes). Maybe even "auto switching" for when a vehicle starts/stops moving. Too bad we are falling back on SD for mobile service.

Now I wonder if the mobile telecom companies have a plan to deliver HD video over WiMax. This could be one of the only ways to get the bitrate needed to do HD in motion. Of course you will have to pay the piper for such a service...and expect commercials on top of that! I'm still disappointed that the ATSC did not think about HD for both fixed and mobile applications.

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post #13 of 510 Old 12-04-2008, 08:42 AM
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No concrete news here but my local PBS station had this on there web site in reference to mobile DTV. Everything below this line is a quote.

Will we add more broadcast services in the future?

As part of our plan, we are reserving broadcast bandwidth for future opportunities. These opportunities may take the form of mobile broadcast channels (a new standard for broadcast to mobile devices is expected within the next 18 months), additional “traditional” broadcast channels, or even the lease of spectrum to commercial interests to provide a stream of income supporting our mission-based work.
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post #14 of 510 Old 01-02-2009, 08:53 PM
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The candidate specifications for Mobile DTV are now online.

http://www.atsc.org/standards/candidate_standards.php

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post #15 of 510 Old 02-24-2009, 04:06 PM
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I haven't gotten very far in studying/making much sense out of the A153 candidate docs yet, then again I haven't spent much time on it ... I quickly discovered my brain is having a difficult time processing some of the new terminology used (such as ATSC ensembles and parades), such that I keep having to refer to the definitions section ....

Anyhow, found some info on recent ATSC M/H field tests in article at following link -- sounds like they're having some issues with strong multipath echoes :

http://www.tvtechnology.com/article/74800

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post #16 of 510 Old 02-25-2009, 01:52 AM
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Interesting that it suggests :

416x240, 624x360 and 832x480 as the three resolutions for broadcast, and adds lower frame rates (1/2 x 24p, 25p and 30p) - and is also all progressive (sensibly)

The Japanese have had their 1-seg mobile DTV system as part of their ISDB-T OTA digital system for a while now, using 1/13th of the bandwith (428kHz AIUI) to carry a mobile TV stream, with the other 12/13ths used for regular OTA for fixed TVs.

(This is relatively easy to do with the COFDM system used by ISDB-T AIUI as you can use different modulation on the 1-seg carriers to the other carriers - so 1-seg uses QPSK, but the other carrries can use QAM, and different FECs and guard bands can be used - quite nifty)

1-seg delivers around 416kbps for video, audio and data services, and uses 320x240 4:3 resolution at around 220-320kbps, with HE-AAC audio at 48-64kbps usually.

AIUI it works OKish - and is a very neat solution in that it uses the same broadcast transmission space as the main DTV signal - just using a portion of it for a modulation scheme with different characteristics.

In Europe we're likely to be going with DVB-H (or possibly DVB-H2) which has worked pretty well in loads of field trials (including at some major Athletics events in Helsinki ISTR - allowing in-stadium viewing).

However DVB-H uses entirely separate transmissions, and thus requires separate RF provision, though it carries many services in a single multiplex. It is based on DVB-T, but with dedicated time-slice slots for each service, allowing the receiver to run at lower power consumption levels (bit like cell phones do) as they only need to work during the time slice period for the service they are tuning to?

Not sure what the visual or bitrate recommendations are for DVB-H.
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post #17 of 510 Old 03-15-2009, 11:15 AM
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Not to dig up an old topic, but since I added a field to my site denoting Mobile DTV, I started researching the subject.

The more I read into it, the more interested in it I become. It looks like each video feed would take less than 1 Mbps, which makes sense given how much more efficient MPEG-4 is and the fewer bits needed for the smaller picture. If that's the case, then the impact on the HD should be negligible, assuming they only do one or two video feeds. That's less than a standard SD subchannel.

I'm confused by the standards though. It seems to imply that 416x240 is the standard resolution, but there are also specifications for higher resolutions. Can someone make sense of this?

And has anyone heard anything about hardware to support it? I'm due for a new cell phone at the end of May and wouldn't mind spending a little extra to get something with Mobile DTV in it, if available to me...

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post #18 of 510 Old 03-15-2009, 12:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nitewatchman View Post

What really caught my eye though in the article, was something I had been wondering about. That is, the article reports reception of these Mobile DTV services may be possible with signals as low as about 4dB S/N ..... Compare to ~15dB S/N for our current "fixed" DTV service for threshold DTV reception ....

hopefully there will also be fixed receivers with external antenna connections available which will support decoding the mobile DTV services, as it seems to me, for those in difficult fixed reception conditions, where(or when) the "conventional" Fixed services can't be received, reception of the more robust Mobile DTV service may be useful ...

These services may see more fixed use than mobile use, actually.

Being designed for mobile use, they are likely less vulnerable to multipath as well as being able to receive a weaker signal.

I could see the current analog translators going to this instead of ATSC in many cases where ATSC can't get the range.

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post #19 of 510 Old 03-15-2009, 06:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trip in VA View Post

It looks like each video feed would take less than 1 Mbps, which makes sense given how much more efficient MPEG-4 is and the fewer bits needed for the smaller picture. If that's the case, then the impact on the HD should be negligible, assuming they only do one or two video feeds. That's less than a standard SD subchannel.

- Trip

But 1 Mbps of video and audio can take up to 5.5 Mbps from the main ATSC stream depending on how much error coding is used. Take a look at Table 6.1 and 6.2 in Part 2.

To break it down, there are eight possible M/H rates:

0.917 Mbps
1.834 Mbps
2.750 Mbps
3.667 Mbps
4.584 Mbps
5.501 Mbps
6.418 Mbps
7.334 Mbps

These rates subtract directly from the main Transport Stream rate of 19.392658 Mbps.

Then depending on how much error coding is used, the payload efficiency ranges from 34% down to 17%. For the most heavily coded combination, the payload rate is 1.263 Mbps at 7.334 Mbps total. For the least coded combination, the payload rate is 2.529 Mbps at 7.334 Mbps total.

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post #20 of 510 Old 03-15-2009, 06:19 PM
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But what is the bitrate of the video? I was trying to calculate it and Could it be a lot less than 1 Mbps?

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trip in VA View Post

I'm confused by the standards though. It seems to imply that 416x240 is the standard resolution, but there are also specifications for higher resolutions. Can someone make sense of this?
- Trip

For higher resolutions, the H.264 video bitstream must use SVC layering (spatial scalability). The base layer is always 416x240 and can be decoded by receivers that only support that resolution. The enhancement layer can be either 832x480 or 624x360 (actually 624x368 with 8 lines of black padding).

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Quote:
Originally Posted by andytiedye View Post

I could see the current analog translators going to this instead of ATSC in many cases where ATSC can't get the range.

There's no "instead of". M/H is part of ATSC and is carried inside of an ATSC bitstream. Although it may provide better coverage, it can only use 7.334 Mbps of the 19.392568 Mbps main stream and it can't be HD.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trip in VA View Post

But what is the bitrate of the video? I was trying to calculate it and Could it be a lot less than 1 Mbps?

- Trip

An exact figure is pretty difficult to calculate since there's so many variables. But it should be a large percentage of the payload rate. The factors would be audio rate (which can be from 96 kbps to 288 kbps) and the various overheads associated with each layer of the protocol (IP, UDP, RTP).

However, it's probably better to think in terms of multiple channels in the payload instead of one channel taking the entire payload. The error coding can be different for each of four groups, so you can have four channels with different levels of robustness. Also, the service will be in competition with MediaFLO, which delivers 12 channels today.

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post #24 of 510 Old 03-17-2009, 10:57 AM - Thread Starter
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From Broadcast Engineering, Mar 17, 2009

Harris to showcase complete product range for ATSC Mobile DTV at NAB2009

At the 2009 NAB Show, Harris will demonstrate how it puts its new and existing solutions together to support the deployment of advanced media workflows for traditional and mobile TV transmission, online content delivery and digital signage networks. Its multiplatform delivery solutions are designed to provide broadcasters seeking new revenue streams with simple transitions into emerging business models.

Based on the company's content management, networking, encoding and transmission platforms, Harris will demonstrate its multiplatform transmission solution integrating its new Maxiva DTV transmitters with its MPH platform. Maxiva transmitters comprise a range of compact liquid- and air-cooled UHF transmitters. The MPH platform can be installed inside Maxiva and other Harris DTV transmitters for delivering DTV, HDTV and mobile DTV services together in the same slice of bandwidth.

Harris' Dynacast helps broadcasters increase online revenue and customer loyalty with integrated broadcast and Web campaigns by providing a two-screen, interactive TV viewing experience. The Dynacast platform lets broadcasters synchronize Web content with live and prerecorded programming. Connecting the broadcaster's channel and brand to the Internet creates a new way to generate revenue through crosspromotion of on-air and online media.

This year, Harris is going beyond product introductions. Revolving live presenters in its Harris Theater will offer tips and demos on how to drive new content management schemes, improve overall operations and how to speed live content to air.

A team of workflow technology experts will be present to discuss solutions to broadcasters' real-world business challenges, such as how to compete with Web-enabled and other nonlinear content providers, technology for reaching mobile viewers and cost-effective transitions from traditional TV transmission to SD, HD and mobile.

The Harris booth will also feature a master control center to show how an interoperable Harris solution lets broadcasters reduce operating costs per channel, stem advertising revenue losses from technical failures and promote rich image branding and viewer loyalty.

See Harris at NAB Booth N2502.

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post #25 of 510 Old 03-17-2009, 01:48 PM - Thread Starter
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From Broadcast Engineering

Do-it-yourself mobile TV broadcasting coming soon to a PC near you, By Carolyn Schuk

When industry outsiders introduce a new technology, futurists prostrate themselves before its transformational potential, and established industry leaders relegate it to hobbyist status. But, eventually, the new technology not only becomes the new status quo, it changes the cultural landscape in ways no one could have imagined.

Mobile TV is the latest new kid on the block, and the concerned players — carriers, broadcasters, content owners, mobile device manufacturers and advertisers — accept how this new technology might disrupt others' business models, all the while fiercely arguing for the centrality of their current role in the food chain.

But while industry mandarins wrestle each other, two new players with a very different POV, the open source and open handset developer communities, are barging into the ring.

At eComm 2009, Francois LeFebvre, project leader at Communications Research Center Canada (CRC), previewed the disruptive possibilities. In “Mobile Digital Broadcasting: Democratizing Innovation”link to download presentation file francoislefebvre-eComm09.pdf, LeFebvre demonstrated CRC's Mobile Multimedia Broadcasting (MMB) transmitter software (running on a commodity laptop) broadcasting to an Openmoko handset equipped with the CRC's Openmokast mobile TV receiver.

"An important challenge in many markets is the convergence of telco-driven and broadcast-driven services," LeFebvre said. "When we talk about mobile convergence, we forget that broadcasting is part of mobile convergence. This specialized infrastructure is at the head of the long-tail, very large audiences.”

"We believe that the real challenge will be to fund the deployment of reliable and strong mobile broadcast networks, and new applications emerging outside the typical realm of telcos and broadcasters will be key," he said. "For this reason, open source mobile phone platforms could be a very effective approach to drive the deployment of mobile broadcast networks."

Introduced at IBC in 2006, the preconfigured, “one click" MMB transmitter software includes a multiplexer, real-time DAB software modulator, receiver manager software, real-time and offline DMB video and audio encoder, digital wave player for direct playback and a test system.

The software runs on an off-the-shelf PC, so "with very cheap hardware, you have a low-cost broadcast transmitter," Lefebvre said.

The Openmokast handset software supplies receiver control, service announcement decoding, demultiplexing, dispatching, decoding and presentation. The Openmoko Neo Freerunner handset, manufactured by Taiwanese FIC, not only includes an open software stack, everything about it is open from the schematic up.

The Openmokast architecture lets developers directly access raw bit streams — something they can't do with conventional TV-enabled handsets, whose feature sets are controlled by manufacturers and carriers.

One example of where this democratizing can go was the protest in Seoul, Korea, last June against U.S. meat imports, where citizen reporters created their own parallel news media. Another harbinger of the future is Japan and Korea's "broadcasting jockeys," who have created 1.5 million private online TV channels.

This alternative to mainstream media "may not have found a business model," said Plus 8 Star CEO Benjamin Joffe, in his eComm talk, “Asia's Best of Breed,” "but the technology has found acceptance." Acceptance from users, that is.

Quote:


Broadcasting is part of mobile convergence, said Communications Research Center Canada's Francois Lefebvre, and new applications coming from outside the telco and broadcaster ecosystem will be key drivers.
http://broadcastengineering.com/RF/y...-soon-pc-0317/


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post #26 of 510 Old 03-26-2009, 06:54 PM
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We finally have TSReader data for a station with Mobile DTV. It's rather disappointing how it shows in TSReader, though not unexpected. KKPX-DT in San Francisco.

http://www.rabbitears.info/screencap.../22644-0_0.htm

All the way at the bottom is an "Unknown Usage" 0x1eee, which is 3.67 Mbps. Divide by 4, you get 0.9175 Mbps, which is almost exactly the data rate in the spec.

TSReader doesn't support it, clearly, but I'm wondering if support for this is something that can be done in software, or if it requires new hardware as well. I've sent an e-mail, at dr1394's suggestion, to the person behind TSReader asking about it.

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WRAL, despite not being on the OVMC list, has launched Mobile DTV:

http://www.wral.com/news/local/story/4948031/

An analysis with a Linux tool by a local user shows they're using a 3 NoG stream.

I'd really like to know what kind of programming is on it. It sounds like it might be a straight simulcast of 5-1 and 5-2 based on the article. Maybe I should e-mail them.

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Raleigh To Be First Real-World Mobile DTV Market

WRAL will broadcast to buses this summer

By Glen Dickson -- Broadcasting & Cable

CBS affiliate and Capitol Broadcasting station WRAL announced that it will launch mobile digital television (DTV) broadcasts to everyday consumers this summer, making Raleigh, N.C. the first U.S. market to commercially deploy mobile DTV.

The station is working with technology vendors LG Electronics and Harris to create a system that will use WRAL's digital spectrum to deliver both linear programming and interactive data to Capital Area Transit (CAT) buses serving passengers throughout the capital city. Beginning this summer, CAT bus passengers will be able to watch WRAL's local, syndicated and network programming throughout the day. In addition to WRAL programming, CAT passengers will also get city-oriented news briefs, real-time weather and other information on digital screens strategically placed inside buses.

The Open Mobile Video Coalition, which represents over 800 stations interested in providing mobile DTV services, announced at the CES show last January that stations in 22 markets would begin mobile DTV broadcasts this year using a new ATSC candidate standard based on the "MPH" technology developed by LG and Harris. That WRAL would be the first OMVC member station to declare its plans is not surprising, as the station has long prided itself on being a technology vanguard: it launched the first commercial HDTV broadcasts in the U.S. back in July 1996, and began doing field tests of mobile DTV last summer.

"Mobile DTV broadcasting is a major part of our future and we are excited to partner with the City of Raleigh as we enter a new era of technology," said James F. Goodmon, President and CEO of Capitol Broadcasting Company, Inc, in a statement. "Mobile DTV enables WRAL to better serve the public by extending our reach with free over-the-air programming and information to people on the go."

LG is providing mobile DTV receivers, flat screen monitors and project development and support, while Harris is supplying its complete "MPH platform for ATSC Mobile DTV", InfoCaster digital signage systems and development and support services. Microspace Communications Corporation will provide wireless networking and digital signage system management, while Digital Recorders, Inc (DRI) will provide integration of the communications systems on the CAT buses.

The first mobile DTV-capable bus in Raleigh is expected to be fully operational this summer, and additional buses will be equipped and rolled out over the next twelve months.

"We are proud to be the pilot to offer mobile digital television to the riders of the Downtown Circulator," said Raleigh Mayor Charles Meeker in a statement. "We salute WRAL for being pioneers in mobile digital television as they were in high definition television. We look forward to the day when all of Raleigh's CAT buses will offer this means of information and relaxation."

Mobile DTV should be a hot topic at the NAB show in Las Vegas next week, where the OMVC is expected to provide further details on its launch plans and various vendors will be demonstrating products using the new ATSC mobile DTV candidate standard. NAB is also hosting a Mobile Entertainment Summit, featuring representatives from networks, handset manufacturers and carriers, on the Wednesday of the show.

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post #29 of 510 Old 04-20-2009, 05:58 AM
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http://www.afterdawn.com/news/archive/17674.cfm

I would have thought Raleigh was first having already launched on WRAL, but these press releases rarely make any sense anyway.

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post #30 of 510 Old 04-20-2009, 07:58 PM
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I was just looking at CNET, but I think the thread here is more informative!

http://news.cnet.com/8301-1035_3-102...CmoreStories.0
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