fiber optics vs time warner - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 11 Old 04-08-2010, 04:30 PM - Thread Starter
Newbie
 
uncleethan23's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I'm deciding whether to go with att's U-Verse at 6mbps vs time warner which gets about 14-15mbps. Are these speeds relatively similar given att is fiber optics and i won't be sharing it with the rest of the neighborhood? I'm not getting any television service and will only be downloading to my plasma using MediaLink, Netflix, etc

Any advice?

Thanks
uncleethan23 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 11 Old 04-09-2010, 12:28 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
Ken H's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Metro Detroit
Posts: 45,876
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by uncleethan23 View Post

I'm deciding whether to go with att's U-Verse at 6mbps vs time warner which gets about 14-15mbps. Are these speeds relatively similar given att is fiber optics and i won't be sharing it with the rest of the neighborhood?

Most cable systems Internet bandwidth is not affected by other users in the neighborhood. If you're paying for a specific speed tier and are not getting it, call and have them fix the problem.

Unless there is a technical problem in the area you are living in, forget about how the system works and simply look at the speed and price, and make a decision on that and any other issues you feel are important like if a contract is required, and other.

'Better Living Through Modern, Expensive, Electronic Devices'

Ken H is offline  
post #3 of 11 Old 04-09-2010, 01:23 AM
 
ChrisWiggles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Seattle
Posts: 20,730
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken H View Post

Most cable systems Internet bandwidth is not affected by other users in the neighborhood. If you're paying for a specific speed tier and are not getting it, call and have them fix the problem.

Unless there is a technical problem in the area you are living in, forget about how the system works and simply look at the speed and price, and make a decision on that and any other issues you feel are important like if a contract is required, and other.

Not true at all, most(if not all) cable internet is very affected by your neighbors because bandwidth is shared in a local area.

You will see drops in max speeds at peak usage times, particularly in the evenings.

How fast you get in reality really depends and can depend on where you are, signal strength, etc, so I wouldn't put much stock in the actual speeds advertised, and either ask neighbors or friends near you or do other research to see what kinds of speeds you actually could expect to get.

My cable-internet speed (Comcast) varies by maybe 5-10 mbps from a high of around 25mbps(down), generally slowing to about 15mbps during peak evening hours.

It's really difficult to say how much max you'd really be getting for an advertised 14-15mbps speed, and then how much that might slow during peak hours. If you really do get close to 15mbps as advertised, I would be pretty surprised if it dropped lower than 6mbps during heavy hours.

But also don't forget that just because it's fiber or DSL, don't assume that you will always be getting consistent speeds either. A lot of times providers still oversubscribe their infrastructure, because it's not likely that everyone will all be doing the most bandwidth heavy things all at the same time, so even on bandwidth that doesn't appear to be inherently shared in the way that neighborhood cable internet is shared, is still in effect being shared by many people. This is part of the advantage of some higher-priced business-class internet service, is not being glommed onto an oversubscribed network that can still bog down during heavy times.

Presumably you're more concerned with download speeds, cable has relatively slow upload, probably equivalent to what you'd get from ATT, etc, so if you are hosting something where upload bandwidth is more important, then obviously pay attention to those numbers, but most people are not concerned about that.

And you'll also want to know if there are other restrictions or issues, for instance Comcast has a monthly data cap, which is kind of lame.

But again, it's kind of hard to say what you'll really be getting in your particular area, which depends on many things. And then on top of that, you're really the only one who knows what you really need. A lot of people would be very satisfied with just a couple mbps, so you may not need to pay for more speed if you don't need it. If you're just an internet gamer for instance, you don't need that kind of bandwidth generally.
ChrisWiggles is offline  
post #4 of 11 Old 04-09-2010, 10:04 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
Ken H's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Metro Detroit
Posts: 45,876
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisWiggles View Post

My cable-internet speed (Comcast) varies by maybe 5-10 mbps from a high of around 25mbps(down), generally slowing to about 15mbps during peak evening hours.

What Comcast tier are you paying for?

'Better Living Through Modern, Expensive, Electronic Devices'

Ken H is offline  
post #5 of 11 Old 04-09-2010, 12:13 PM
 
ChrisWiggles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Seattle
Posts: 20,730
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken H View Post

What Comcast tier are you paying for?

You know, that's an interesting question. It isn't actually clear to me because they've changed their tiers and speeds several times over the years I've had Comcast internet, and my tier is not explicitly described on the bill, and the price I pay doesn't match the standard (non-introductory) pricing of the tiers in my area.

The base price for my internet is 59.95, which I guess probably means I get the Ultra tier, which is advertised 30mbps down for 62.95.

But it's also a little difficult to tell what exactly I get because of powerboost, so sustained download speeds can be a little different than some of the speed tests would indicate. But it's still plenty fast for me, and I've got 5-6 people and probably a dozen computers on my network.

I can sustain several mbps of constant download on tor*rent and still measure around 23-25mbps on speakeasy and bandwidthplace tests, and others too. And I think I came close to 20mbps on two different computers running a bandwidth test at the same time with several megs of tor*rent going at the same time, so I've never really felt bogged down on speed except for occassional outages or other obvious problems.
ChrisWiggles is offline  
post #6 of 11 Old 04-09-2010, 12:32 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
Ken H's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Metro Detroit
Posts: 45,876
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisWiggles View Post

You know, that's an interesting question. It isn't actually clear to me because they've changed their tiers and speeds several times over the years I've had Comcast internet, and my tier is not explicitly described on the bill, and the price I pay doesn't match the standard (non-introductory) pricing of the tiers in my area.

The base price for my internet is 59.95, which I guess probably means I get the Ultra tier, which is advertised 30mbps down for 62.95.

But it's also a little difficult to tell what exactly I get because of powerboost, so sustained download speeds can be a little different than some of the speed tests would indicate. But it's still plenty fast for me, and I've got 5-6 people and probably a dozen computers on my network.

I can sustain several mbps of constant download on tor*rent and still measure around 23-25mbps on speakeasy and bandwidthplace tests, and others too. And I think I came close to 20mbps on two different computers running a bandwidth test at the same time with several megs of tor*rent going at the same time, so I've never really felt bogged down on speed except for occassional outages or other obvious problems.

If you aren't getting the tier speeds, and I don't mean Powerboost, then you can call for service and they will increase the bandwidth for your area. This is a common issue for cable, and if you let Comcast know, they will fix it.

Your bill will tell you what tier you're on, at least it does on all the Comcast bills I've ever seen. Worst case you can call or look on Comcast's web site to see the available tiers and pricing.

My point is this: Regardless of bandwidth fluctuating due to the demand at any given time, which no question is a real issue, at the very least you can get the speeds you are paying for very consistently, if you know what you're supposed be to be getting, and let Comcast know if there is a problem.

As Comcast adds Internet customers to any given area, they also add additional bandwidth capability, but unless someone lets then know there is a problem, you may not be getting what you pay for.

'Better Living Through Modern, Expensive, Electronic Devices'

Ken H is offline  
post #7 of 11 Old 04-09-2010, 01:27 PM
 
ChrisWiggles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Seattle
Posts: 20,730
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 15
If it said on my bill, then I would know, but it does not.
ChrisWiggles is offline  
post #8 of 11 Old 04-09-2010, 11:33 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
Ken H's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Metro Detroit
Posts: 45,876
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisWiggles View Post

If it said on my bill, then I would know, but it does not.

I'd like to help. What does the line item for Internet on your bill say?

'Better Living Through Modern, Expensive, Electronic Devices'

Ken H is offline  
post #9 of 11 Old 04-10-2010, 08:46 AM
AVS Special Member
 
egnlsn's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Taylorsville, UT
Posts: 2,238
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken H View Post

Most cable systems Internet bandwidth is not affected by other users in the neighborhood. If you're paying for a specific speed tier and are not getting it, call and have them fix the problem.

Unless there is a technical problem in the area you are living in, forget about how the system works and simply look at the speed and price, and make a decision on that and any other issues you feel are important like if a contract is required, and other.

Agreed. Time Warner is fiber from the headend all the way to the node that feeds your area. That means that, depending on where you live in relation to the headend and also to the node, it is fiber up to 99% of the way from the headend to your home. The system that feeds you could easily be 85% fiber.

As Ken wrote, the important factor is speed more than how it gets there. Which is a better deal; 6Mbps or 14Mbps?

I have had cable internet for 10 years, and the only times I have seen speeds that were less than what I pay for have been when there were network issues. I don't think there have even been 5 such occasions in the 10 years.

As for the variations in speedtests; speedtests are dependent on the pathway between you and the server to which you are testing, as well as the loading of the server itself.

Talk to some people in your area who have either service. Base your decision on that.

CIAO!

Ed N.
egnlsn is offline  
post #10 of 11 Old 04-11-2010, 04:06 AM
Advanced Member
 
CRT Dude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Hanover, PA
Posts: 887
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
$59 sounds like performance with no TV/phone (42+17 how dare you not have TV fee) which is 6/1 or 12/2 if you have D3.
As for the OP I think TWC's standard tier is 7/512 with powerboost upto 15. AT&T's pro tier is 6/1 no powerboost. Uverse uses interleave which adds 10-20ms to latency if thats important to you. Does AT&T sell Uverse internet by itself or do you still have to subscribe to TV then cancel?
CRT Dude is offline  
post #11 of 11 Old 04-11-2010, 12:42 PM
 
ChrisWiggles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Seattle
Posts: 20,730
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by CRT Dude View Post

$59 sounds like performance with no TV/phone (42+17 how dare you not have TV fee) which is 6/1 or 12/2 if you have D3.

Right. This has been what I have assumed in the past(because I don't get TV), and I mainly haven't wanted to ask too many questions because I get significantly faster speeds than their basic tier. I've even debated whether to upgrade the modem, because I have an older docsis 1.1 unit, but I kind of don't want them to realize that they may have screwed up and are giving me more speed than I should have. Because like I said, I am getting sustained speeds at 20-25 mbps, so I don't ask too many questions. And I've also seriously blown past their 250gb cap several times, so I'm not trying to draw any attention to myself exactly...

I've had enough experience with Comcast that often they'll give you extra stuff out of laziness or incompetence, but if you start bothering them somebody will realize that you're getting services you're not supposed to and end your gravy train.

btw, the line item is "high-speed internet." Which is why I've always assumed their basic tier ("performance"), but I've always gotten much faster speeds than that so I don't ask and don't tell.
ChrisWiggles is offline  
Reply HDTV Technical

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off