'Hotwiring' antenna rotor? - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 13 Old 05-15-2010, 12:12 AM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
Vchat20's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Posts: 870
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
This is one I have been meaning to ask for a while but never gotten around to it.

I have an old unknown vintage outdoor VHF/UHF antenna on my house complete with rotor and all. Neither of them I know the age or exact make and model of. All I know is it was sometime before we moved into this house which was 10 years ago. Nothing has any identifiable markings on it.

The antenna is good reception-wise. Last summer I climbed the tower and rewired it in a 'get by with what I've got' kind of way with a spliced balun at the base of the antenna where the VHF/UHF combiner sits and then a 40-50ft stretch of old RG59 into the house. With that said I get very reliable reception on my target DMA stations and even fringe pickup or cleveland stations, even though the antenna is pointed away from both DMAs (more specifically it is pointed in a more northeast/southwest direction when youngstown is south and cleveland is roughly west-northwest).

Which brings me to the point of my question. Hopefully sometime in the next couple weeks if weather cooperates I plan to replace the RG59 with some more substantial Quad-sheifl RG6 to hopefully cut down some multipath issues I'm having as well as strengthening reception from Cleveland. As stated I do not have any idea what make and model or age the rotor is (only thing I do know is the wiring is a quad conductor feed last I recall seeing and it was cut off not far below the rotor itself). I do not plan on using it since my desired stations are fairly well clustered from my perspective to keep the antenna pointed in one spot. But I would like to get it turned somehow to point more directly at Youngstown if I can (or Cleveland depending on signal strength. My thoughts being my proximity to youngstown might prove to be an overload to my equipment with a more directional aim, whereas that would come in handy for cleveland and the backside of the antenna could still get strong reception of youngstown stations. Am I correct on this theory?). With the old RG59 in place after I swap the RG6 in would I be able to somehow hotwire this into 2 specific conductors on the rotor just to have the motor spin with no specific destination and apply voltage at the other end long enough to get the antenna aimed where I want? As mentioned, I don't intend to make this permanent. Just enough to get the antenna reaimed once and be done with it.

Thanks.

Vchat20 is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 13 Old 05-15-2010, 10:33 AM
AVS Special Member
 
ctdish's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Mystic,CT,USA
Posts: 1,321
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 20
Most older rotors I have see run on 24-32 volts AC. Three connections to the motor are required with one being phase shifted through a capacitor.
To get more help on reception post a link to your location's signal strength from TVFool and a picture of your present setup.
John
ctdish is offline  
post #3 of 13 Old 05-15-2010, 01:12 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
Vchat20's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Posts: 870
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Well here's my tvfool reading to start: http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wr...cd72df8a6d6d73

I'll try and get a shot of the antenna from ground level later as I'm not home right now.

Vchat20 is online now  
post #4 of 13 Old 05-15-2010, 03:57 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
Ken H's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Metro Detroit
Posts: 45,876
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
When I read the topic title, I thought someone wanted to run cable to a neighbors rotor, and control it from their house......

'Better Living Through Modern, Expensive, Electronic Devices'

Ken H is offline  
post #5 of 13 Old 05-15-2010, 05:14 PM
Senior Member
 
Tschmidt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Milford, NH
Posts: 303
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vchat20 View Post

would I be able to somehow hotwire this into 2 specific conductors on the rotor just to have the motor spin with no specific destination and apply voltage at the other end long enough to get the antenna aimed where I want?

All the TV rotors I've used are three wire. There was no capacitor in the controller. It appears one terminal is common, one for CW rotation, and the other for CCW.

If you want to play with it take it down and try connecting it to a 24-volt transformer. I replaced a Radio Shack controller several years ago and the new one ran rotor in reverse. Was too lazy to figure out how to wire it correctly. A single pole double throw (SPDT) switch ought to work fine for controlling the rotor. Just be careful not to run it too long against either stop.
Tschmidt is offline  
post #6 of 13 Old 05-15-2010, 07:55 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
Vchat20's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Posts: 870
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tschmidt View Post

All the TV rotors I've used are three wire. There was no capacitor in the controller. It appears one terminal is common, one for CW rotation, and the other for CCW.

If you want to play with it take it down and try connecting it to a 24-volt transformer. I replaced a Radio Shack controller several years ago and the new one ran rotor in reverse. Was too lazy to figure out how to wire it correctly. A single pole double throw (SPDT) switch ought to work fine for controlling the rotor. Just be careful not to run it too long against either stop.

This is what I was kinda hoping for. I can't remember if it was 3 or 4 wire but if the former I can go ahead and try this. If I can't find anyone with an old controller around here I can easily find a 24VAC transformer with a couple amps of current and go from there. Again, not planning to make it a permanent setup, just enough to get the antenna rotated to my desired aim. If the rotor dies in the process, a small casualty I'm not gonna miss.

I did get a chance to go outside again and check the aiming of the antenna. No photo though, camera's on the fritz. Our house is right about square N,S,E,W according to google maps so it makes a good reference and indeed the antenna is pointing with the frontend facing about southwest and the back northeast. While Youngstown is about SSE and Cleveland about WNW.

Vchat20 is online now  
post #7 of 13 Old 05-16-2010, 07:53 AM
Member
 
jkxmlr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 89
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Loosen the ubolts and reaim.
jkxmlr is offline  
post #8 of 13 Old 05-16-2010, 08:20 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Scooper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Youngsville, NC USA
Posts: 5,058
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkxmlr View Post

Loosen the ubolts and reaim.

+1 - assuming they are not rusted frozen

You CAN put antennas on your owned and/or controlled property...
http://www.fcc.gov/mb/facts/otard.html

Being A Beacon of Knowledge in the darkness of FUD
Scooper is offline  
post #9 of 13 Old 05-16-2010, 09:15 PM
Advanced Member
 
johnpost's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 783
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
that would be the Armstrong brand of rotor.

actually better for this case, a tv rotor that may not have a rapid brake may be more work to aim with rotor than by loosening either the mast or antenna and giving a spin. digital takes 30 to 60 seconds to see affect also, would be time consuming to jog with a rotor.
johnpost is offline  
post #10 of 13 Old 07-27-2013, 06:00 PM
Newbie
 
edantolin13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
i have seen my sky king su-2000 full automatic antenna rotator, there is a capacitor on the controller 7 microfarad 50 volts. thanks.
edantolin13 is offline  
post #11 of 13 Old 07-27-2013, 09:46 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Otto Pylot's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 7,092
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 97 Post(s)
Liked: 228
Is this relevant for a three year old post?
Otto Pylot is offline  
post #12 of 13 Old 02-05-2014, 03:04 PM
Newbie
 
Greg W Izzerd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 11

Sure is. Information is timeless.This thread just answered my question.:) 

Tschmidt likes this.
Greg W Izzerd is offline  
post #13 of 13 Old 02-10-2014, 09:21 AM
Senior Member
 
Tschmidt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Milford, NH
Posts: 303
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Finding technical info about TV rotors can be a challenge. I found a Radio Shack schematic when I was troubleshooting mine, it that was a great help.

Agree with the other posters that typical rotor is a 2-phase motor. Controller switches between them to change direction. A capacitor is used to provide phase shift. As far as I can tell uP controllers simply replace the mechnical switch with relays and count power line cycles to maintain sync.

Tschmidt is offline  
Reply HDTV Technical

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off