WiFi Using 5GHz Band? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 18 Old 08-18-2010, 11:57 AM - Thread Starter
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[From what I've read here, it seems like streaming HD video wirelessly is a dicey proposition. Oh well, one can always try. ]

Does HDTV WiFi use the 2.4GHz band only or can it also use the 5GHz band? Some televisions claim they have "dual band" WiFi. Does it very from model to model?
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post #2 of 18 Old 08-18-2010, 12:28 PM
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only 802.11a wi-fi operates in the 5Ghz band. 802.11b, g, and n all operate in the 2.4Ghz band. It the TV spec's do not say 802.11a, then no matter what they mean by "bands", it is not using 5 Ghz.
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post #3 of 18 Old 08-18-2010, 01:00 PM - Thread Starter
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I believe 802.11n operates in 5GHz.
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post #4 of 18 Old 08-18-2010, 01:08 PM
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802.11n operates both in the 2.4 GHz band and the 5 GHz band.

What a given TV uses will depend on the manufacturer. There is no industry standard for "HDTV WiFi" per se.
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post #5 of 18 Old 08-18-2010, 01:36 PM
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Are you experiencing a "problem" with 2.4 GHz?
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post #6 of 18 Old 08-18-2010, 02:06 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ratman View Post

Are you experiencing a "problem" with 2.4 GHz?

A problem? Heavens no...I'm still shopping for my first HDTV. But when I was setting up my home network last year I learned about the bandwidth problems people can have when streaming to televisions and computers on the same frequency band.

I won't know if I have a problem until I actually try. But if I do have a problem, I would consider a dual-band router...if my TV supports the 5GHz band.

As someone said, it varies among brands and models. I wouldn't rule out a TV just because it can't do 5GHz, but if I'm stuck between two TVs it might help my decision.
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post #7 of 18 Old 08-18-2010, 03:37 PM
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The radio frequency used for transmission should not (and is not) be equatible to the bandwidth.

True that many routers and portable phones use 2.4 GHz and may conflict. Heck... our cell phones interfere with 5.8 GHz portable phone.

Bottom line is the weakest link, which is from your cable modem to the cableco.

OTOH... if you want to eliminate any potential wireless issues, run Cat5e cable.
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post #8 of 18 Old 08-18-2010, 03:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ratman View Post

OTOH... if you want to eliminate any potential wireless issues, run Cat5e cable.

In some cases Powerline Ethernet adaptors can work well as well. (In the UK I've been using a pair of "200Mbs" models for a while to stream HD with no major issues)
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post #9 of 18 Old 08-18-2010, 05:55 PM
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Wireless or powerline. You can potentially have interference issues affecting thoughput.
Hardwired is the best option.

Your internal network can be 1 GHz. You're still limited (restricted) to the upstream/downstream speed of the subscribed network (provider).
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post #10 of 18 Old 08-19-2010, 07:05 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ratman View Post

Wireless or powerline. You can potentially have interference issues affecting thoughput.
Hardwired is the best option.

Your internal network can be 1 GHz. You're still limited (restricted) to the upstream/downstream speed of the subscribed network (provider).

Thanks to everyone for your help.

My question wasn't about upstream or downstream speed...that's up to your ISP. It was about interference.

In that regard, the physics of the environment - like how far the TV is from the access point, how many walls are in between the two and their construction - counts much more than the frequency band. Ain't nothing like a wire.

However, in situations where the 2.4 GHz band is crowded, perhaps by other computers on the network, it might be worthwhile to switch your IPTV watching to the 5 GHz band, if it's available. That's a big might.

Vizio seems to think it might come in handy, since they offer dual-band WiFi. Which lead me to wonder whether dual-band is offered by others as well.
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post #11 of 18 Old 08-19-2010, 08:31 AM
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Maybe I'm on the wrong track, but...

The majority of internet enabled TV's don't support wireless without a dongle. With that in mind, I guess one could choose the appropriate dongle and wireless router to support the higher radio frequency(s), if it's necessary (due to 2.4 GHz clutter).

Personally, I wouldn't limit a TV purchasing decision based on it's wireless internet capability.
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post #12 of 18 Old 08-19-2010, 08:40 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ratman View Post

Maybe I'm on the wrong track, but...

The majority of internet enabled TV's don't support wireless without a dongle. With that in mind, I guess one could choose the appropriate dongle and wireless router to support the higher radio frequency(s), if it's necessary (due to 2.4 GHz clutter).

Personally, I wouldn't limit a TV purchasing decision based on it's wireless internet capability.

Very much agreed on both your points.
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post #13 of 18 Old 08-19-2010, 10:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ratman View Post

...I guess one could choose the appropriate dongle...

Will that work? Are all USB wifi dongles compatible with the drivers in every TV? TV manufacturers usually warn against attempting to use any except the specified one. Of course, that could just be so they sell more of them.
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post #14 of 18 Old 08-19-2010, 03:09 PM
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Who said USB only?
How about an ethernet "bridge"?
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post #15 of 18 Old 08-19-2010, 03:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by m_vanmeter View Post

only 802.11a wi-fi operates in the 5Ghz band. 802.11b, g, and n all operate in the 2.4Ghz band. It the TV spec's do not say 802.11a, then no matter what they mean by "bands", it is not using 5 Ghz.

Not true Wireless N operates on the 5 Ghz band as well, I should know I have dual band Linksys N router and I have G running in 2.4 Ghz and N running on 5Ghz.
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post #16 of 18 Old 08-20-2010, 06:39 AM
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thanks everyone for the "n" protocol corrections. Since the 802.11n wap's and adapters can use the 5 Ghz band or the 2.4 Ghz band, is that a parameter you "set" when first installing a 802.11n device ???
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post #17 of 18 Old 08-20-2010, 09:05 AM
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Most WISPs use the 5.2, 5.4, or 5.7GHz bands for their wireless link from the access point to the home. Many also have some 2.4GHz access points. The channels used in the 2.4GHz band for routers are the same channels used in 2.4GHz access points, and the channels in the 5GHz band for routers go from 5.175-5.830GHz (in the U.S.).

If you or a neighbor has a WISP for the service provider and you or they experience service issues such as slow speeds, choppy VoIP, etc., you (or they) may need to change channel on the router.

CIAO!

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post #18 of 18 Old 08-20-2010, 09:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by m_vanmeter View Post

thanks everyone for the "n" protocol corrections. Since the 802.11n wap's and adapters can use the 5 Ghz band or the 2.4 Ghz band, is that a parameter you "set" when first installing a 802.11n device ???

Depending on your WAP the settings can be changed to use only 2.4 on 802.11n or both 5ghz and 2.4ghz for 802.11n. Its worth noting that 5ghz is an optional spec for wireless N, so you have to check your specific model to see if your WAP even is capable of 5ghz wireless N.

The 5 ghz band of N has more bandwidth than the 2.4 ghz band (according to pcworld's real world test they saw about a 20% improvement in speed) but it also has the benefit of much less interference. Cordless phones, microwaves, and kid's toys mostly operate in the 2.4 ghz band so you are less likely to run into inteference if you use the 5ghz band of wireless N. The downside is that the 5ghz spectrum has less range than the 2.4ghz spectrum, so if your tv would have more than one or two walls between it and the router the 5ghz band might not get the best reception.

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