Does FIOS have better HD picture quality than Comcast? - Page 2 - AVS Forum
View Poll Results: Is FIOS picture quality better than Comcast?
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post #31 of 48 Old 07-21-2013, 08:13 PM
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But you could see a difference between Comcast and FIOS?
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post #32 of 48 Old 07-22-2013, 07:29 AM
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I did state that I had Comcast analog only, so that would negate the HD comparison between the two. wink.gif

My point is that with an OTA channel, bandwidth compression is virtually nil (depending on the number of subchannels for that particular channel). I saw no difference with OTA vs. FiOS.

But to answer your question.... yes, I obviously saw a difference between Comcast (analog) and FiOS.biggrin.gif
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post #33 of 48 Old 07-22-2013, 09:03 AM
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+1 OTA! OTA!
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post #34 of 48 Old 07-22-2013, 03:22 PM
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Different provider, TWC was my cable, Verizon now with FIOS.

The technician mentioned something about using the existing incoming cables, and it looked like he even leveraged the existing old coax cable that I used for my cable TV. Is that normal?

-JR
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post #35 of 48 Old 07-23-2013, 05:59 AM
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Yes. Verizon used my existing coax installed by Comcast. Even used the same splitters.
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post #36 of 48 Old 07-23-2013, 09:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JuiceRocket View Post

Different provider, TWC was my cable, Verizon now with FIOS.

The technician mentioned something about using the existing incoming cables, and it looked like he even leveraged the existing old coax cable that I used for my cable TV. Is that normal?

-JR
Not normal here in a 21-story NYC apt building. The tech ran a single optical fiber from the double optical fiber in the hallway to the boxes (battery backup, etc.) next to my viewing position. Even ran the fiber, hard to see due to its small diameter, down the opposite wall of my former cable installs (TWC and RCB). Assume the hallway drop combined TV/internet signals onto the single fiber run.

Guess I'll update my posts above mentioning using test patterns and a optical reticle to measure potential effective (visual) resolution differences between cable systems and FIOS. Doesn't look like HDNet (now Axs HD) or HDNet Movies will be sending out its test pattern (linked above) again. But this thread in the calibration forum points out there's now a Blu-ray calibration disc carrying a test pattern presumably similar to the discontinued HDNet converging-lines patterns. The 2nd edition Blu-ray also includes, like my 1st-edition S&M test disc, some frequency-burst patterns, although they're too limited in frequency range to really pinpoint where higher resolutions fall off. -- John
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post #37 of 48 Old 07-23-2013, 10:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mason View Post

Not normal here in a 21-story NYC apt building. The tech ran a single optical fiber from the double optical fiber in the hallway to the boxes (battery backup, etc.) next to my viewing position. Even ran the fiber, hard to see due to its small diameter, down the opposite wall of my former cable installs (TWC and RCB). Assume the hallway drop combined TV/internet signals onto the single fiber run.

Guess I'll update my posts above mentioning using test patterns and a optical reticle to measure potential effective (visual) resolution differences between cable systems and FIOS. Doesn't look like HDNet (now Axs HD) or HDNet Movies will be sending out its test pattern (linked above) again. But this thread in the calibration forum points out there's now a Blu-ray calibration disc carrying a test pattern presumably similar to the discontinued HDNet converging-lines patterns. The 2nd edition Blu-ray also includes, like my 1st-edition S&M test disc, some frequency-burst patterns, although they're too limited in frequency range to really pinpoint where higher resolutions fall off. -- John

John can you please post a picture of your setup particularly the boxes that you describe as having a fiber input? My understanding is that FIOS installs an ONT where fiber is converted to coax which feeds the equipment in the home. All the devices listed by Verizon FIOS web page none have a fiber input.
http://www22.verizon.com/Support/Residential/tv/fiostv/receivers/user+guides/user+guides.htm.
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post #38 of 48 Old 07-23-2013, 11:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RollTide2011 View Post

My understanding is that FIOS installs an ONT where fiber is converted to coax which feeds the equipment in the home. All the devices listed by Verizon FIOS web page none have a fiber input.
.
You are correct. Fiber to the ONT, coax to modem/STB's. Uses QAM64/256 just like cable. It's fiber to the premises, not fiber to each device.
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post #39 of 48 Old 07-23-2013, 04:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Ratman View Post

You are correct. Fiber to the ONT, coax to modem/STB's. Uses QAM64/256 just like cable. It's fiber to the premises, not fiber to each device.

No one is doing fiber to the device in GPON/Active E, but with Verizon it is a RF overlay in the GPON system that they are using,

All Comments made are my own and not of my employer.
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post #40 of 48 Old 07-24-2013, 06:14 AM
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Originally Posted by ybsane View Post

No one is doing fiber to the device in GPON/Active E, but with Verizon it is a RF overlay in the GPON system that they are using,
Can you clarify (in laymen's terms)? You sort of confused me. Are you saying that Verizon does fiber to the device somewhere (residential)? Since I was quoted, I'm wondering what I may have misstated.
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post #41 of 48 Old 07-24-2013, 11:01 AM
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If what i've read was correct GPON is a fiber splitter, so in a MDU setting as described by John it maybe used to get a fiber drop to multiple units where a LAN is used to feed voice/video/data via ethernet/ WiFi connection.
I work with HFC networks so i'm learning as well.smile.gif
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post #42 of 48 Old 07-24-2013, 11:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RollTide2011 View Post

John can you please post a picture of your setup particularly the boxes that you describe as having a fiber input? My understanding is that FIOS installs an ONT where fiber is converted to coax which feeds the equipment in the home. All the devices listed by Verizon FIOS web page none have a fiber input.
http://www22.verizon.com/Support/Residential/tv/fiostv/receivers/user+guides/user+guides.htm.
A bit more description:The battery backup is very compact, smaller than a metal lunch box, while the fiber input box is still smaller, about the size of old phone modem. Both sit, unnoticed, on a long wall shelf with other hi-fi gear. Might be there is other gear on my floor that serves all ~23 apartments. Vaguely recall that is one of two ways of fiber-cabling apt buildings--cheaper but lacking the ability for major upgrades in capacity. -- John
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post #43 of 48 Old 07-24-2013, 01:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mason View Post

A bit more description:The battery backup is very compact, smaller than a metal lunch box, while the fiber input box is still smaller, about the size of old phone modem. Both sit, unnoticed, on a long wall shelf with other hi-fi gear. Might be there is other gear on my floor that serves all ~23 apartments. Vaguely recall that is one of two ways of fiber-cabling apt buildings--cheaper but lacking the ability for major upgrades in capacity. -- John
I was more interested in what runs from the "fiber input box "(ONT) to the CPE ( modem, DCT "cablebox", eMTA (Telephone)) is it COAX or CAT5e.
Thanks for the reply smile.gif
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post #44 of 48 Old 07-24-2013, 03:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ratman View Post

Can you clarify (in laymen's terms)? You sort of confused me. Are you saying that Verizon does fiber to the device somewhere (residential)? Since I was quoted, I'm wondering what I may have misstated.

Sorry, no one is doing fiber to a set-top/switch is what I meant to say. I apologize..smile.gif

All Comments made are my own and not of my employer.
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post #45 of 48 Old 07-25-2013, 05:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RollTide2011 View Post

I was more interested in what runs from the "fiber input box "(ONT) to the CPE ( modem, DCT "cablebox", eMTA (Telephone)) is it COAX or CAT5e.
Thanks for the reply smile.gif
The single-fiber-input box on my hi-fi-equipment shelf has a coax output to a compact router/modem sitting next to my computer; it has another coax out to a nearby HD DVR, plus another SD DVR. Recall a long post in the FIOS hardware thread a few years back where a knowledgeable AVSer outlined the differences between installations like my apt building and typical single-dwelling homes. -- John
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post #46 of 48 Old 09-23-2013, 11:05 AM
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JuiceRocket: I agree 100%. I just came from Comcast in the Boston area, and the digital artefacting on FiOS is no better, and in some cases worse, than Comcast. Were it not for the lower price, I'd be going back to cable in an instant. It's absolutely clear that whatever former advantage FiOS had has completely evaporated as they've added so many channels. The fact that they are fiber to the home is mostly moot for video quality given that they are still encoding the video as an RF overlay on the optical signal. I understand why they have to do this (they can't put a tuner in the service box, and so your house's existing cable has to be able to carry the entire range of channels) but they should be more honest about their main advantage being in internet bandwidth and latency. The only difference between FiOS and Comcast in terms of video capacity to the home is that FiOS can put the internet and phone on separate wavelengths, thus freeing their RF video overlay to ONLy carry video. But that's not a huge difference over all. I think that buys FiOS only a dozen or so QAM-wide channels that Comcast has to dedicate to internet and phone. Don't get me wrong: I'm very happy with FiOS, mostly due to lower price, but the idea that FiOS's video is going to be better, let alone significantly better, than Comcast has completely evaporated.
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post #47 of 48 Old 11-16-2013, 04:53 PM
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Totally agree with last poster - I converted to Fios from Comcast over 5 years ago, and remember the difference being astounding. Watching an HD football game, I recorded the pic to show off to my neighbors, to convince them to get the hell off of Comcast! Well, that is an experience of the past. Now, sports events have tons of smudges and blocking whenever there is fast action or low-light areas. I guess I need to hook up to my old OTA antenna to see if it's the FIOS or the source; all along I had been assuming that the networks were reducing their feed bandwidth but by reading this thread, I'm now realizing it could be FIOS becoming a victim of their success and jamming more stations down the pipe.

I've been sold an HD experience, but the truth is that in my current setup, I'm like SD+. Maybe they're buttering me up so I go "wow!" when they try to sell 4K...
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post #48 of 48 Old 11-17-2013, 05:32 AM
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DirectTV in my experience was by far the best IQ.

Comcast was pretty good IQ wise, but the service was far from stable. We pulled the Comcast plug when we couldn't even get a solid stream for the Super Bowl.
We moved to DirectTV which was a huge gain in IQ, and a fair more stable service. To start saving money we then moved to EPB, our local fiber provider, and the IQ was pretty bad. Granted it is dirt cheap TV, but I was expecting IQ along the lines of DirectTV with it being fiber. It seemed like they broadcast only in a lower bitrate 720p. Dropped that to save even more money when I discovered what OTA was and that we would get 36 channels. IQ is as good as Comcast and DirectTV depending on channels.
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