Effect of weather/atmospheric conditions on OTA TV? - AVS | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
Baselworld is only a few weeks away. Getting the latest news is easy, Click Here for info on how to join the Watchuseek.com newsletter list. Follow our team for updates featuring event coverage, new product unveilings, watch industry news & more!


Forum Jump: 
 2Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 34 Old 01-19-2012, 02:06 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Badfish740's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 78
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 11
I was wondering what I can expect from a well designed OTA TV system during different weather conditions? The Dish we have now basically works fine except in really driving rains (and I mean coming down in sheets-normal rainfall doesn't phase it), and of course when it gets covered with snow. What kinds of weather and/or atmospheric conditions can affect TV transmissions? Are sunspots, solar flares, and other atmospheric conditions typically a factor? I had a neighbor growing up who was a CB enthusiast who had a 60' tower in his backyard, etc... I remember him talking about something called "the skip" that happened either during a certain time of year (or during certain kinds of weather-I don't really remember), but basically whatever this condition was it allowed the waves to bounce of certain parts of the atmosphere, allowing them to travel much much farther than usual. Is anyone familiar with this phenomenon and does it apply to television waves?
Badfish740 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 34 Old 01-19-2012, 02:44 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
Ratman's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Collingswood, N.J.
Posts: 15,158
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 468 Post(s)
Liked: 419
If you want to install an antenna for OTA channels, it shouldn't be a problem and probably better than satellite (E*/D*) due to inclement weather.

Are you looking to unsubscribe to Dish and just use an antenna or seeking an answer to a hypothectical question about reception issues?

In other words... what exactly is your question/problem/desire/expectation?
Ratman is offline  
post #3 of 34 Old 01-19-2012, 03:43 PM
Senior Member
 
Tschmidt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Milford, NH
Posts: 308
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 11
In general weather does not have a huge effect on OTA, but it really depends on how strong the signals ares at your location.

We are in a fringe area so seasons are more important then weather. Our antenna is lower then tree tops so we get worse reception on weak stations during the summer then winter.

If you have not already done so plug you address into TVfool to model expected signal strength.
Tschmidt is offline  
post #4 of 34 Old 01-19-2012, 04:11 PM
Member
 
Bozzmonster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Royal Oak, MI
Posts: 151
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ratman View Post

If you want to install an antenna for OTA channels, it shouldn't be a problem and probably better than satellite (E*/D*) due to inclement weather.

Are you looking to unsubscribe to Dish and just use an antenna or seeking an answer to a hypothectical question about reception issues?

In other words... what exactly is your question/problem/desire/expectation?

My neighbors have Dish and DirecTV. I have a modest outdoor antenna. I can say from my experience:

During very heavy rain they lose signal, I keep mine.
During very heavy snow, they lose signal, I keep mine.
During heavy winds (that move the trees) they keep their signal, I have minor breakups once in a while.
During major tropospheric events, my neighbors keep their signal, and I get to watch TV from out of state markets!

Add in the fact I don't pay for my TV programming, and I say I come out ahead.
Bozzmonster is offline  
post #5 of 34 Old 01-19-2012, 07:58 PM
Senior Member
 
agus0103's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Brainerd, MN
Posts: 201
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Liked: 21
Here is a good read about tropospheric DX modes, which are influenced by weather and by far the most common factors that cause OTA TV signals to occasionally travel farther than they normally would. Other factors, such as "skip" like you mentioned, are driven by ionospheric, solar, or other atmospheric conditions and aren't very common, but can greatly affect OTA TV signals when they do appear. The last skip event I can remember here was in 2008, during which time I was able to tune in a TV station (in analog) from over 1100 miles away with just an indoor antenna.

How frequently you might see the weather-related events occur depends mostly on where you live, with relatively flat, warm, moist (coastal) regions seeing them most frequently. Even so, being that these conditions are not considered normal, distant TV stations brought in by them can quickly come in and go out, meaning you cannot rely on these signals as you would the signals of your closest, local, stations.
agus0103 is offline  
post #6 of 34 Old 01-20-2012, 01:10 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
scowl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 10,586
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 105 Post(s)
Liked: 37
Another problem is lightening. A bolt of lightening will often cause a moment of pixelization. This problem became more widespread after many digital stations moved to VHF after the analog shutoff since it affects VHF more than UHF.

NOW: my post on AVS Forum.
NEXT: someone else's post on AVS Forum.
scowl is online now  
post #7 of 34 Old 01-20-2012, 03:33 PM
Senior Member
 
Speed Daemon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Location, Location
Posts: 419
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 22
I've been watching OTA TV since there were all 82 channels (2-83) reserved for TV stations, and DIY hobbies were still popular. The TV frequencies (wavelengths get shorter as frequencies get higher, BTW) ranged from the low VHF band to the high UHF band. Within this range of frequencies are three distinct bands: VHF-LO, VHF-HI and UHF.

Back then, UHF was kind of mystical because most consumer electronics designers had little experience in this band, and equipment quality varied widely. These days the roles are reversed, as UHF is widely used and lower frequencies' peculiarities have made them less desirable. Here's a very basic synopsis of the main qualities of the bands:

VHF-LO: Generally for line-of-sight use only. Long wavelength requires large antenna to work best. Good for long range reception, although TV frequencies were mostly immune from the interactions with the universe that made shortwave bands so much fun. Good point-to-point performance in forested areas. Poor penetration of buildings and other structures. Used to be preferred in LMR (land mobile radio) use for rural areas.

VHF-HI: Mostly for line-of-sight use only. Shorter wavelength more practical for building and vehicle mounting of antennas. Suitable although not ideal for longer range communications. Shorter wavelengths offer fair building penetration, especially at higher powers and/or close range. A compromise of the benefits and problems associated with lower and higher frequencies. Used to be preferred in LMR use for suburban areas. Still the band of choice for aeronautical communications and fire departments.

UHF: Strictly for line-of-sight use only. Even shorter wavelength most practical for hand-held, as well as other antenna mounting. Suitable only for line-of-sight communications. Excellent penetration into buildings, but poor performance in wooded areas. Can be made to perform well in all areas through the use of high mounted "look down" antenna/repeater infrastructure. Preferred in LMR for urban areas. Preferred for ATSC television broadcasting.

Satellite TV also uses different frequency bands in the SHF region and beyond. C Band was and still is used for network TV program distribution. It was used briefly for home reception, but is no longer supported for home use mostly. Every Satellite TV service in the US uses the Ku Band. The Ku Band's shorter wavelengths allows smaller antennas for a given amount of gain and spatial selectivity. (With the Clarke Belt as crowded as it is, it's often more important to be able to focus on one "bird" and reject its neighbors than it is to achieve enough gain and S/N ratio.

While consumer Ku systems are prone to fading with high levels of precipitation, there are many misconceptions about why this happens. Briefly, it's not related to any resonances in of water or its component elements. It's just that water is the most common form of matter to get in the way of a line-of-sight signal. This is exacerbated by the demand for smaller, cheaper and "less ugly" antennas, which must be mounted outside because they can't "see" through walls either.

Electrical discharges such as lightning often do interfere with TV reception of all kinds. This is because most electrical discharges produce the same kind of electromagnetic energy that TV transmission relies on. Needless to say, blotting out the organized signal with a random one will cause a loss of information.

You get what you pay for.  For professional advice, pay the professional rate.
Speed Daemon is offline  
post #8 of 34 Old 01-20-2012, 04:18 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
scowl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 10,586
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 105 Post(s)
Liked: 37
I'm saddened to hear that UHF is "Strictly for line-of-sight use only" considering how many people I know are receiving UHF channels in their basements.

NOW: my post on AVS Forum.
NEXT: someone else's post on AVS Forum.
scowl is online now  
post #9 of 34 Old 01-20-2012, 04:46 PM
Senior Member
 
Speed Daemon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Location, Location
Posts: 419
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by scowl View Post

I'm saddened to hear that UHF is "Strictly for line-of-sight use only" considering how many people I know are receiving UHF channels in their basements.

Why is that sad?

The same basic "look down" technology and the shorter UHF wavelengths that make it possible to receive line-of-sight TV broadcasts and cellular service is saving lives of citizens and the public servants who serve them every day. My idea of sad is having someone die while paramedics struggled to establish contact with a physician, or never arrived because nothing happened when the stricken person used the only phone within reach, the cellphone, and couldn't connect.

You get what you pay for.  For professional advice, pay the professional rate.
Speed Daemon is offline  
post #10 of 34 Old 01-20-2012, 09:05 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
arxaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 10,909
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by scowl View Post

Another problem is lightening. A bolt of lightening will often cause a moment of pixelization. This problem became more widespread after many digital stations moved to VHF after the analog shutoff since it affects VHF more than UHF.

Lightning is a huge problem here for VHF OTA reception. And the lightning doesn't have to be that close, just anywhere in the region. The pixelization can be overlooked - it's the audio dropouts that are so %$&*#@ annoying. Fortunately in our area, we only have one commercial DTV channel that opted to stay on VHF - the rest of them abandoned it for the more reliable UHF band.
arxaw is offline  
post #11 of 34 Old 01-21-2012, 09:38 AM
AVS Special Member
 
jspENC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Jacksonville, NC
Posts: 4,367
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 48 Post(s)
Liked: 20
Lightning is bad here in eastern NC on WNCT channel 10, but does not seem to affect WCTI on channel 12. I am not sure if it is because they have a circular polarized antenna, or if it is because their tower is a bit closer to my location? WNCT tower 41 miles out, WCTI 23 miles. The UHF are unaffected.
jspENC is offline  
post #12 of 34 Old 01-21-2012, 09:50 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
arxaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 10,909
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Could be location and power. Also, ch 12 being higher frequency than 10, perhaps it is slightly less prone to lightning dropouts (?).
arxaw is offline  
post #13 of 34 Old 01-21-2012, 11:54 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Otto Pylot's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 8,091
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 426 Post(s)
Liked: 317
Quote:
Originally Posted by Badfish740 View Post

I was wondering what I can expect from a well designed OTA TV system during different weather conditions? The Dish we have now basically works fine except in really driving rains (and I mean coming down in sheets-normal rainfall doesn't phase it), and of course when it gets covered with snow. What kinds of weather and/or atmospheric conditions can affect TV transmissions? Are sunspots, solar flares, and other atmospheric conditions typically a factor? I had a neighbor growing up who was a CB enthusiast who had a 60' tower in his backyard, etc... I remember him talking about something called "the skip" that happened either during a certain time of year (or during certain kinds of weather-I don't really remember), but basically whatever this condition was it allowed the waves to bounce of certain parts of the atmosphere, allowing them to travel much much farther than usual. Is anyone familiar with this phenomenon and does it apply to television waves?

It depends, in part, on where you live in relationship to the transmission towers. LOS is very important. In our case, we live about 45-50 miles from the towers but have an unimpeded LOS. High winds, pouring rain, freezing temperatures, fog, summer heat have no effect at all on our reception. However, our antenna is roof mounted, about 30' from ground level secured with 3 sets of guy wires and is a 79 element, UHF-VHF-FM antenna.
Otto Pylot is offline  
post #14 of 34 Old 01-21-2012, 07:23 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
arxaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 10,909
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by scowl View Post

I'm saddened to hear that UHF is "Strictly for line-of-sight use only" considering how many people I know are receiving UHF channels in their basements.

Or people in a valley with a huge hill directly in front of the antenna, between it and the transmitters 70 miles away. Lots of folks in my area getting UHF that way. UHF is not strictly LOS.
arxaw is offline  
post #15 of 34 Old 01-22-2012, 04:10 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Badfish740's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 78
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by arxaw View Post

Or people in a valley with a huge hill directly in front of the antenna, between it and the transmitters 70 miles away. Lots of folks in my area getting UHF that way. UHF is not strictly LOS.

You've actually touched on something that I'm currently wrestling with. I live in a small valley (elevation 400') and three miles to my east is a hill (800' elevation-400' higher than me) that breaks the LOS between me and the NYC transmission towers (about 1200' high) 48 miles away. Many have already told me that NYC reception is either impossible or so poor its not worth it.
Badfish740 is offline  
post #16 of 34 Old 01-22-2012, 04:39 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
arxaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 10,909
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Reception behind a hill is often possible and certainly worth a try. It's usually a trial and error process to find a hot spot for all your channels of interest, much like using an indoor antenna. And the antenna hot spot is often in very unorthodox places. See:
http://www.hdtvexpert.com/?p=134
arxaw is offline  
post #17 of 34 Old 04-20-2015, 01:22 PM
Member
 
nextgenfmradio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 61
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Liked: 3
In a nutshell?

Yes, severe thunderstorms wind events can affect signal
as can airplanes flying over

All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others
nextgenfmradio is offline  
post #18 of 34 Old 04-20-2015, 02:15 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
Ratman's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Collingswood, N.J.
Posts: 15,158
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 468 Post(s)
Liked: 419
After three years... nothing has changed. Even out of the nutshell.
nextgenfmradio likes this.
Ratman is offline  
post #19 of 34 Old 04-20-2015, 06:44 PM
Member
 
nextgenfmradio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 61
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Liked: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ratman View Post
After three years... nothing has changed. Even out of the nutshell.
thanks ratman

not to mention digital looks and sounds like crap when signal gets slammed

i just put my ant up on the roof

all matter of nonsense interrupts signal, a squirrel in a tree can cause interference, stations need to increase power

All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others

Last edited by nextgenfmradio; 04-20-2015 at 06:48 PM.
nextgenfmradio is offline  
post #20 of 34 Old 04-20-2015, 08:46 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Otto Pylot's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 8,091
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 426 Post(s)
Liked: 317
Location! I've had a roof-mounted antenna in the same position for almost 30 years. Virtually dead-on-balls perfect for HDTV with no weather or squirrel related issues at all
Ratman likes this.
Otto Pylot is offline  
post #21 of 34 Old 04-21-2015, 04:24 AM
Advanced Member
 
Skytrooper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Baden, Pa.
Posts: 634
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 84 Post(s)
Liked: 96
During heavy rain, my Dish goes out. It also goes out when snow begins to melt. There can be a few inches of snow on it and it still works. It's only when it begins to melt is when I lose signal.

This is when I switch over to antenna. During a rainstorm it depends how hard it rains. The antenna works better during a storm, but it still goes out. The Dropouts are annoying, more so than in the Analog days.

Airplanes were a big problem in the Analog days, being I live near the Pittsburgh Airport. The signal would vary between weak and strong til the plane passed. This problem seems to have gone away with the switch to Digital.

(LCD - Sony KDL - XBR4) (Receiver - Sony STR-DA4ES)(Blu Ray - Oppo BDP-83) (PS3)( Dish Hopper DVR With Sling) Speakers (L & R - Paradigm Studio 20) (Center -Paradigm CC-470) (Surrounds & Back Surrounds - Paradigm SA-15R in walls) (Subwoofer 1 - Sunfire HRS-12) (Subwoofer 2 - Paradigm PW-2100)
Skytrooper is offline  
post #22 of 34 Old 04-21-2015, 04:42 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Digital Rules's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Chantilly, VA
Posts: 1,832
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 90 Post(s)
Liked: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skytrooper View Post
Airplanes were a big problem in the Analog days . . . . . This problem seems to have gone away with the switch to Digital.
Nope, the problem is still there for many viewers. Too bad OTA can't buffer data like streaming video over the internet.
Digital Rules is offline  
post #23 of 34 Old 04-21-2015, 08:22 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Calaveras's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Mountain Ranch
Posts: 3,773
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 516 Post(s)
Liked: 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skytrooper View Post
During heavy rain, my Dish goes out. It also goes out when snow begins to melt. There can be a few inches of snow on it and it still works. It's only when it begins to melt is when I lose signal.

This is when I switch over to antenna. During a rainstorm it depends how hard it rains. The antenna works better during a storm, but it still goes out. The Dropouts are annoying, more so than in the Analog days.

Rain does not cause attenuation on UHF. If the signal drops out when it's raining there's something else going on. In order to cause significant attenuation the rain drops have to be around 1/4 wave in size on the frequency of operation. On UHF channel 51 a quarter wave is 4.25". Anyone ever seen 4" raindrops? OTOH at 12 GHz 1/4 wave is .25". That certainly occurs in heavy rain.
Calaveras is offline  
post #24 of 34 Old 04-21-2015, 08:22 AM
Advanced Member
 
Skytrooper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Baden, Pa.
Posts: 634
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 84 Post(s)
Liked: 96
Red face

Quote:
Originally Posted by Digital Rules View Post
Nope, the problem is still there for many viewers. Too bad OTA can't buffer data like streaming video over the internet.
Maybe it's because I'm thinking back to the mid 60's when the majority of aircraft were propeller, much slower. They lingered around a lot longer before passing by.

(LCD - Sony KDL - XBR4) (Receiver - Sony STR-DA4ES)(Blu Ray - Oppo BDP-83) (PS3)( Dish Hopper DVR With Sling) Speakers (L & R - Paradigm Studio 20) (Center -Paradigm CC-470) (Surrounds & Back Surrounds - Paradigm SA-15R in walls) (Subwoofer 1 - Sunfire HRS-12) (Subwoofer 2 - Paradigm PW-2100)
Skytrooper is offline  
post #25 of 34 Old 04-21-2015, 08:30 AM
Advanced Member
 
Skytrooper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Baden, Pa.
Posts: 634
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 84 Post(s)
Liked: 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calaveras View Post
Rain does not cause attenuation on UHF. If the signal drops out when it's raining there's something else going on. In order to cause significant attenuation the rain drops have to be around 1/4 wave in size on the frequency of operation. On UHF channel 51 a quarter wave is 4.25". Anyone ever seen 4" raindrops? OTOH at 12 GHz 1/4 wave is .25". That certainly occurs in heavy rain.
The antenna signal definitely breaks up during a heavy rainstorm. Not as bad as my Dish. Also cloudy days affect the weaker signal channels.

(LCD - Sony KDL - XBR4) (Receiver - Sony STR-DA4ES)(Blu Ray - Oppo BDP-83) (PS3)( Dish Hopper DVR With Sling) Speakers (L & R - Paradigm Studio 20) (Center -Paradigm CC-470) (Surrounds & Back Surrounds - Paradigm SA-15R in walls) (Subwoofer 1 - Sunfire HRS-12) (Subwoofer 2 - Paradigm PW-2100)
Skytrooper is offline  
post #26 of 34 Old 04-21-2015, 09:06 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
Ratman's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Collingswood, N.J.
Posts: 15,158
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 468 Post(s)
Liked: 419
I have no problem with wind, rain, snow, lightning, trees/leaves, birds, squirrels, nor aircraft (I'm in the flight path of PHL).
Attic mounted antenna since 2002. As Otto stated, "Location!" And I would add... a good antenna and efficient installation of quality cables and connectors.
Ratman is offline  
post #27 of 34 Old 04-21-2015, 09:42 AM
Member
 
nextgenfmradio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 61
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Liked: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ratman View Post
I have no problem with wind, rain, snow, lightning, trees/leaves, birds, squirrels, nor aircraft (I'm in the flight path of PHL).
Attic mounted antenna since 2002. As Otto stated, "Location!" And I would add... a good antenna and efficient installation of quality cables and connectors.
Well that's good, glad you enjoy it and have a good location

I will say moving to roof helps a lot for most

All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others
nextgenfmradio is offline  
post #28 of 34 Old 04-21-2015, 09:45 AM
Member
 
nextgenfmradio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 61
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Liked: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skytrooper View Post
Maybe it's because I'm thinking back to the mid 60's when the majority of aircraft were propeller, much slower. They lingered around a lot longer before passing by.
It is definitely There depending On flight path and what channels you are trying to receive and location many variables best you can do is what ratman said

All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others
nextgenfmradio is offline  
post #29 of 34 Old 04-21-2015, 09:46 AM
Member
 
nextgenfmradio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 61
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Liked: 3
Lightning will affect reception too

For split second signal will drop out

All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others
nextgenfmradio is offline  
post #30 of 34 Old 04-21-2015, 10:34 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Calaveras's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Mountain Ranch
Posts: 3,773
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 516 Post(s)
Liked: 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skytrooper View Post
The antenna signal definitely breaks up during a heavy rainstorm. Not as bad as my Dish. Also cloudy days affect the weaker signal channels.

There's three completely different issues here. Water is affecting your antenna somehow. It could be that heavy rain is bridging what is supposed to be air gaps in the elements or transmission line. That will mess up the antenna. An antenna of a different design will fix that problem. Satellite TV is affected by heavy rain because it's around 12 GHz and large raindrops will attenuate the signal. Weak signals that come and go are being affected by temperature inversions and have nothing to do with clouds. The most common reported situation is the signals are best in the evening and morning and degrade in the afternoon. Temperature inversions extend signal range / enhance signals. Solar heating by midday breaks up the inversions and weak signals drop out. Development of afternoon cumulus clouds and showers is a visual indicator of temperature inversions breaking up. On the west coast the top of the stratus layer marks the inversion level. The mid morning breakup of the stratus layer indicates the inversion breaking up.
Calaveras is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply HDTV Technical



Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off