Is it possible to bring a US/CDN TV to Australia (ATSC to DVB-T) - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 11 Old 01-27-2012, 01:40 PM - Thread Starter
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Forgive me if this thread already exists, but with the rate at which technology changes, I am hopeful this will work. I'm also under a lot of pressure to move countries very quickly and researching tech stuff seems to take hours! SO...

I just sold my CDN 120V 60hz Sony 46" LCD, and hope to purchase a brand new dual voltage TV from Costco.ca and include it in our container shipment to Australia. (Costco Australia will honour the replacement period for 90 days and warranty for 2 years.)

* Shipping cost is not a factor in this situation.

* Voltage is not a factor, as I would be purchasing a 120/240V 50/60Hz model.

1. My concern is with the digital TV formats: DVB-T and ATSC.

- Is there a Australian converter that will convert DVB-T to ATSC?

- What about a set top box that will output to ATSC?

- could I bring a North American satellite dish to Australia and by-pass this whole issue? (I am only assuming satellite signals are transmitted constantly, unless they shut off when they leave the NA zone?. still, doesn't hurt to ask!)

2. IF I have to buy a TV in Australia for excessive costs:

- am I correct to assume that my CDN Playstation 3 will correctly play on an Ozzie TV?

- and allow me to play my Region 1 DVD's and Blurays on an Ozzie TV?

- I have considered buying a region free DVD player, such as an Oppo. But, is there such a thing as region free blu ray?

- - Would a US region free Oppo output in DVB-T for an Ozzie TV?

- Is it cheaper to simply keep the north american PS3 to play my Region 1 products, and buy a Region 4 player in Australia?

Finally:

Does anyone know of any TV's sold in Canada/US that are world compatible in terms of digital video formats?

Cheers!
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post #2 of 11 Old 01-27-2012, 02:13 PM
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Quote:


- could I bring a North American satellite dish to Australia and by-pass this whole issue? (I am only assuming satellite signals are transmitted constantly, unless they shut off when they leave the NA zone?. still, doesn't hurt to ask!)

Geosynchronous sattellites appear in a fixed position from the earth. The ones over N America aren't over Australia, so you won't get a signal from them.

I doubt there are any DVB to ATSC convertors, there would be a very small market for them anyway.

you're better off buying locally.
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post #3 of 11 Old 01-27-2012, 02:27 PM
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Sell your Canadian TV and buy locally, or buy a DVB-T set top box. However, the set top box will almost certainly use a SCART connector which your Canadian TV will not support (Unless DVB-T boxes now use HDMI). You may also have problems getting your TV to handle 50hz instead of 60hz.

A SCART connector carries a composite signal, and a vastly superior RGB signal (similar to a VGA connector for a PC), whereas a Canadian TV will do composite and SVIDEO, which is not as good as RGB.

Saying that, if you come back again, your Aussie TV will almost certainly work as a monitor with everything you plug into it in the US, but the tuners are incompatible.

Don't bring you sat dish with you! If you need Sat, buy locally as you will need to sign up with whoever covers Australia.
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post #4 of 11 Old 01-27-2012, 05:01 PM
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For TV get one there, If your Satellite Receiver is DVB-S/DVB-S2 you are fine, just need to load a new satellite plan depending on what type of Receiver you have. (most are made in China,so should no be a problem)

All Comments made are my own and not of my employer.
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post #5 of 11 Old 01-27-2012, 05:34 PM
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Suggest you read through applicable threads in the AUSTRALIAN DTV Forum:
http://www.dtvforum.info/

Yes, U.S. format devices, such as PS3, DVD Players, Blu-Ray Players, etc should be compatible with
Ozzie TV's, DTV's & HDTV's. In the HDMI and Component Video I/F specs, in addition to 576i/p (50Hz)
Aussie formats, you should find the usual assortment of 480i/p, 720p and 1080i/p (24, 30, 60 Hz).

Conversely, most Ozzie electronic components will be compatible with U.S. TV's, DTV's & HDTV's,
(if they run on 240-VAC, 50 Hz) for 480i/p, 720p and 1080i/p (24, 30, 60 Hz), but carefully check HDTV
specs to see if I/Fs accept 576i/p (50 Hz), 720p (50 Hz) & 1080i/p (50 Hz), since most U.S. ONLY
HDTV's do NOT. Low-rez S-Video and Composite Video (Yellow RCA jack) are employed world-wide,
but most U.S. ONLY TVs won't accept 50 Hz versions. Hence need for Multi-System HDTV.

Dual-Voltage, Multi-System HDTVs listed here appear to have either NO tuner (a monitor) or a built-in
DVT-B (vice ATSC) Tuner with HDMI and Component Video inputs for Hi-Def....you'll have to search
manu's website to download a manual to see if they are SCART (unlikely) or separate R/G/B type I/Fs:
http://www.world-import.com/tv.htm

SCART is the old Euro connector containing all three R/G/B signals plus S-Video. Inexpensive adapter
cables between SCART and R/G/B Component Video are readily available. But if you search various
Australian websites, you'll find that many (most? all?) electronics use the same connectors as we do:
http://connectedhome.build.com.au/vi...ur-set-top-box
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SCART

FWIW: Here's info re Sony KDL-HX800 Multi-System HDTV, which came with the usual HDMI & R/G/B
connectors when tested by PCMag, equipped with Analog PAL & Hi-Def DVB-T tuners (NO NTSC/ATSC):
http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2366976,00.asp
http://www.sony.co.in/product/kdl-55hx800#manuals
http://support.sony-asia.com.edgesui...4187886121.pdf
Note that although specs say it supports 480i/p, 576i/p, 720p and 1080i/p, they DO NOT EXPLICITLY
say that these include both 50 Hz and 60 Hz (surely a Multi-System TV would).

IMPORTANT: When looking at detailed HDTV specs (pg11 in the Sony Manual), note that there
are important DIFFERENCES between Australia, New Zealand and Singapore wrt the Digital
Colour/Video System specs (the latter two include H.264/MPEG4). You want to make sure
the HDTV specs include AUSTRALIA, which are different than a Europe-ONLY model.
In the Sony Manual, I didn't see an operator entry to select the intended country...maybe
it's found in the set's built-in iManual (not described).....or perhaps it's "auto-detected"....

Note that there are different channel bandwidths and frequency assignments.
Although Western Europe and Australia use 7 MHz VHF bandwidths, frequencies
are shifted by 2 MHz wrt to the other. And in UHF Band, Western Europe
uses wider 8 MHz bandwidth channels, whereas Australia uses 7 MHz bandwidth:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Televis...cies#Australia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PAL

Also note that UK uses DVB-T/MPEG-2 for SD and DVB-T2/H.264/MPEG-4 for HD transmissions,
whereas Australia uses DVB-T/MPEG-2 for both SD and HD transmissions. We should expect
that Multi-System HDTVs are either set-up for the intended country or employ "auto-detect":
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DVB-T

I don't know what Costco has to offer....It would be either 1) they have an ATSC/NTSC tuner to meet
the Federal Reg's for being labeled a "TV" or 2) NO tuner and it's labeled a "Monitor" or (unlikely???)
3) Only a DVB-T/PAL Tuner (would it violate Fed Regs???) or 4) BOTH ATSC and DVB-T tuners.
If either case 1) or 2), HD-STBs (for DVB-T and maybe also PAL) are readily available in Australia:
http://itopfield.com.au/ [Manuals can be downloaded]
http://www.harveynorman.com.au/tv-au...p-boxes-pvrs-1

Google "region free blu-ray players", such as fol:
http://www.world-import.com/region_f...VD_players.htm
http://www.videohelp.com/dvdhacks [There may be hacks to make yours region free.]
If your existing Region A Blu-Ray Player works on 50Hz, 240-VAC (my Oppo-93 is 50/60-Hz, 100-240 VAC),
you could continue using it for Region A (US/CAN) discs and simply buy another Blu-Ray Player in Australia.

BTW: Unless the manu. states their equipment will work on 50-Hz power, you are taking a chance if you
use electronics & appliances via a simple 240/120-VAC transformer....it may or may not work--RELIABLY...
In general, if it has a fan (incl. mixers), don't try it.... Some appliances may run TOO S...L...O....W....
http://www.armory.com/~stacey/frequency-50.html
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Can_you_pl...0V_60Hz_outlet
NOTE THE SAFETY WARNINGS!!!!


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post #6 of 11 Old 01-28-2012, 02:46 AM
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Aussie TV broadcasts are 50Hz and North American TV broadcasts are 60Hz.

Many North American TVs won't accept 50Hz video signals - whether composite, S-video, Component or HDMI. A few do though, and if your TV is one of these, then you could use an external set top box bought in Australia to receive DVB-T broadcasts and feed them in via an AV input (HDMI or Component probably if you want Aussie HD broadcasts) AIUI it is often the big name brands that DON'T have 50Hz compatibility, whereas the lesser-known models may offer it. One easy way of checking is to plug in a PC to your TV's HDMI input and see if you are offered 25/50Hz refresh rates as well as 30/60Hz rates. If you are offered 50Hz rates then that suggests your TV is happy to accept a 50Hz input via HDMI - which means it would work with Aussie HDMI-equipped set top boxes.

You won't find any DVB to ATSC converters AFAIK - because ATSC is only used in 60Hz territories, whereas most (but not all) countries using DVB-T are 50Hz, so even if you did the conversion you'd still have an incompatible video signal at the end of it.

I would VERY seriously recommend buying a TV in Australia.

Whilst North American TV sets are often 60Hz only, European and Australian TVs are almost always compatible with both 50Hz and 60Hz AV sources (so you can plug in US DVD Players, PS3s, Blu-ray players etc. with no problems), whereas the reverse is not true. (In Europe it's a licensing requirement to use the pan-European "HD Ready" or "HDTV" logos - though not sure about Aus)

I'd avoid any form of consumer level 50-60Hz standards converters - the picture quality is likely to be lousy particularly on motion.
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post #7 of 11 Old 01-30-2012, 02:53 PM
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Since there is no operator entry to select 50 Hz (PAL) or 60 Hz (NTSC) refresh output,
PS3 is obviously set by the manufacturer, with different models for North America and Europe/Asia:
http://manuals.playstation.net/docum...deooutput.html
But if an Aussie or Multi-System HDTV supports BOTH 50 Hz and 60 Hz refresh signals, no problem.


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post #8 of 11 Old 01-30-2012, 03:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by holl_ands View Post

Since there is no operator entry to select 50 Hz (PAL) or 60 Hz (NTSC) refresh output,
PS3 is obviously set by the manufacturer, with different models for North America and Europe/Asia:
http://manuals.playstation.net/docum...deooutput.html
But if an Aussie or Multi-System HDTV supports BOTH 50 Hz and 60 Hz refresh signals, no problem.

ish. My UK PS3 happily outputs 24Hz, 50Hz and 60Hz. It automatically switches between them based on the content it is playing - presumably because my TV's HDMI connection reports compatibility with all three refresh rates. No need for operator intervention - EDID handles this.
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post #9 of 11 Old 01-31-2012, 01:59 AM
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Similar discussion for North America vs Europe models is found here:
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=934779


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post #10 of 11 Old 01-31-2012, 03:58 PM
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As always, the general advice is to sell what you have here before you go, and buy new or used when you get wherever it is you're going.

'Better Living Through Modern, Expensive, Electronic Devices'

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post #11 of 11 Old 02-01-2012, 01:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken H View Post

As always, the general advice is to sell what you have here before you go, and buy new or used when you get wherever it is you're going.

Yes. The only caveat to that is if you have a library of content that is regionally restricted.

Whilst multi-region solutions are widespread for DVDs, if you have a library of Region A Blu-rays that you wish to bring to a Region B country (and you don't want to go down the PC route for replay), then it is worth considering bringing your Blu-ray player with you to continue to play them (as multi-region Blu-ray is trickier on standalone players).

Similarly if you have games for your games console that won't play on a newly purchased local device, then it is worth bringing that and your games with you and sorting out the power issues.

(There should be no issue connecting a North American Blu-ray player or modern games console to any European HDTV - the only issue will be coping with 230V/50Hz rather than 110V/60Hz power)
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