CBS' "soap opera effect" - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 8 Old 09-26-2012, 08:39 AM - Thread Starter
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OK so this might be a bit long winded. My father wanted me to go see my Uncle's new LED TV. Said that it was so much better than his LCD and that the TV shows looked "different". So I agreed and went to see this new TV. I agreed, it did look "different". My Uncle, my father and myself have DirecTV. So my father goes out to buy this same TV. He also saw this "difference" in the display. So a week or so goes by and the new season shows come out. We mainly watch the CBS shows, but on my TV (SONY XBR LCD) I also see this "difference". Now I don't believe it is the TV, but rather the broadcast, cameras, Directv or something. The picture is much sharper, much more "natural" looking, it is hard to describe. I also notice on the CBS "splash screens" where there is a head shot of one of the shows or something that there are "floating" CBS symbols. These would lend itself to a 3D TV, how they float around. Is CBS doing something different with their broadcast, their camera technology, is it Directv? It is something because there is a noticeable difference, even to the point my kids see the difference. I can not speak for NBC of Fox because the shows we mainly watch are on CBS. I will have to check them out to see if there is the same difference...
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post #2 of 8 Old 09-26-2012, 10:03 AM
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It's called HD- High Definition!
... just kidding!
Maybe DTV dialed down the compression a bit? Are they .h264/mpeg4 yet?

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post #3 of 8 Old 09-26-2012, 10:41 AM
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The "natural look" could be what some call the soap opera effect from the motion interpolation being turned on, or set to a user preference setting. I watched CBS last night (NCIS and Vegas) OTA and didn't see anything out of the ordinary. NCIS is always filmed a bit softer than NCIS: LA but they both looked great. The crawlers at the bottom for upcoming shows looked "normal" to me. Maybe DTV is using a lower compression rate than usual but I doubt it.
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post #4 of 8 Old 09-27-2012, 10:34 AM
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Google Soap Opera Effect. You may need to change some settings in your TV.

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post #5 of 8 Old 09-27-2012, 04:06 PM
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Are you sure he is selecting the HD CBS channel and not the SD CBS channel on Direct TV?
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post #6 of 8 Old 09-29-2012, 11:17 AM
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This sounds like 'soap opera effect' to me as well.

To be more precise - content shot on 24fp film or 24fps video (movies, drama, most sitcom and some documentary) has a very distinctive motion look - which if shown at 3:2 pulldown on 60Hz broadcasts can look jerky, and in all cases has a distinctive, low frame-rate look. (Some material may also be shot at 30fps which has a similar low frame-rate look, but won't have the asymmetric judder of 3:2)

Other content - primarily entertainment, news, sport - is shot at 60images per second (either interlaced or progressive) and has a more fluid look (as it is giving you more than twice the number of different images per second)

HOWEVER - modern TVs often include processing (Motion Flow, Natural Motion, Motion Plus etc.) which tries to convert 24/30 content to 60 or higher images per second by creating 'in between' frames based on the content of the source frames. This can make the motion look a lot smoother, and some people like this effect. (However it can go spectacularly wrong on complex motion, and gets confused by compression artefacts in some cases)

Could be that the different displays being discussed differ in this regard (one has the effect enabled, one doesn't have it or it is disabled)
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post #7 of 8 Old 09-29-2012, 11:37 AM
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Please keep topic titles specific.

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post #8 of 8 Old 09-29-2012, 01:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sneals2000 View Post

This sounds like 'soap opera effect' to me as well.

To be more precise - content shot on 24fp film or 24fps video (movies, drama, most sitcom and some documentary) has a very distinctive motion look - which if shown at 3:2 pulldown on 60Hz broadcasts can look jerky, and in all cases has a distinctive, low frame-rate look. (Some material may also be shot at 30fps which has a similar low frame-rate look, but won't have the asymmetric judder of 3:2)

Other content - primarily entertainment, news, sport - is shot at 60images per second (either interlaced or progressive) and has a more fluid look (as it is giving you more than twice the number of different images per second)

HOWEVER - modern TVs often include processing (Motion Flow, Natural Motion, Motion Plus etc.) which tries to convert 24/30 content to 60 or higher images per second by creating 'in between' frames based on the content of the source frames. This can make the motion look a lot smoother, and some people like this effect. (However it can go spectacularly wrong on complex motion, and gets confused by compression artefacts in some cases)

Could be that the different displays being discussed differ in this regard (one has the effect enabled, one doesn't have it or it is disabled)

Since we really don't have a clear description of what the "difference" is he sees, it could also be the fact that CBS is not multicasting like the other networks, so it uses less compression on its 1080i picture. This might also act in conjunction with the frame rate increase if the TV does frame interpolation to make a better looking picture.
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