RG11 compression Connector installation - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 17 Old 10-14-2012, 11:20 PM - Thread Starter
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I am going to connect the RG 11 Compression connector.Is there any installation guide available as guidance.thanks for the help.
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post #2 of 17 Old 10-15-2012, 08:32 AM
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The only difference is that you use a 1/4"x1/4" stripper for Series 11 cable. Other than that, it's the exact same as Series 6 cable.

CIAO!

Ed N.
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post #3 of 17 Old 10-15-2012, 09:02 AM
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One difficulty encountered when installing an RG-11 compression connector is that when you slide or push it onto the coax, you cannot actually see whether the coax center conductor adequately penetrates the connector center pin's internal contact sleeve.

I always establish a depth reference by use a small, pointy object as a depth gauge, inserting it into the connector hole where the coax dielectric and center conductor go, and I use my thumbnail to mark its depth, Then, I hold the stripped RG-11 coax with the tip of its center conductor touching my thumbnail, and so the depth gauge can now show where exactly the RG-11 must be pushed in to when the center conductor makes initial contact, and I put a piece of tape about 1/4" further down, and then I push the RG-11 in until the tape reaches the connector sleeve. That assures that my center conductor has penetrated the internal seizure contact by 1/4

Sometimes, it takes quite a bit of force to stuff the RG-11 all the way in. To put force on the connector without damaging its pin, you can screw the connector onto a 2-way splitter and use tht as a pushing handle.,
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post #4 of 17 Old 10-15-2012, 09:39 AM
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With the exception of when I had to use SNS fittings, I've never had any issues.

CIAO!

Ed N.
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post #5 of 17 Old 10-15-2012, 09:54 AM
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I once had to service a DirecTV stacked trunkline system in a three tower condo complex where they used about 60 RG-11 compression connectors and had so many "phantom" problems that could occur if someone grazed a coax in the telephone closet , that I wound up cutting off and replacing all 60 RG-11 connectors. Believe me, there are a lot of misinstalled RG-11 connectors out there, but there is no way of seeing the problem if the center conductor is just pressing against the pin seizure sleeve rather than penetrating it
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post #6 of 17 Old 10-15-2012, 10:14 AM
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Oh, I know there are a lot of improperly installed fittings out there. Fortunately, the vast majority of fittings I've had to contend with have been my own. Sure, I've cussed myself out a few times, but fortunately not that often. wink.gif

CIAO!

Ed N.
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post #7 of 17 Old 10-15-2012, 11:01 AM
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Just a question....
Why does the OP require RG11?
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post #8 of 17 Old 10-15-2012, 12:17 PM
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What else ya gonna use to go from the wallplate to the cable modem? Everybody knows that the bigger the cable, the faster the speeds. More room to get more of them dBs in! (Not to mention the MegaBytes) wink.gif

CIAO!

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post #9 of 17 Old 10-15-2012, 02:11 PM
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Oh.... I thought he was looking for "higher definition". tongue.gif
It was a serious question though. Why RG11?
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post #10 of 17 Old 10-15-2012, 03:17 PM
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He has to use RG-11 because no other size coax will fit in his RG-11 compression connectors. wink.gif
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post #11 of 17 Old 10-15-2012, 03:21 PM
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Perhaps he lives a few hundred feet from the tap; could be working on the infrastructure of an MDU -- there are several possibilities.

On another note, Ratman; I know you like to do a lot of studying. Why don't we actually use RG6, 59, 11 cable, but, rather Series 6, 59, 11 cable. I know we see RG6, 59, 11 written or whatever all over the place. What's the difference?

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post #12 of 17 Old 10-15-2012, 04:05 PM
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I just asked a question. Don't be an ass. rolleyes.gif
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post #13 of 17 Old 10-15-2012, 04:29 PM
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I'm not being an ass, Ratman. I apologize if it came across that way. That was a valid question. We see RG6 written all over the place. Technically, it isn't RG6 cable that we use, but RG6 Type or Series 6 cable. What is the difference between RG6 and RG6-Type (or Series 6) cable?

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post #14 of 17 Old 10-15-2012, 04:58 PM
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post #15 of 17 Old 10-15-2012, 05:53 PM
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That merely describes coaxial cable, which was not the question. The major cable manufacturers refer to their cable as "Series 6" or "RG6 Type." The major connector manufacturers refer to their connectors as being for "Series 6 or 6 Series cable." Why do they not call it RG6? There must be a reason.

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post #16 of 17 Old 10-16-2012, 04:18 AM
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From the link above:
Quote:
A series of standard types of coaxial cable were specified for military uses, in the form "RG-#" or "RG-#/U". They date from World War II and were listed in MIL-HDBK-216 published in 1962. These designations are now obsolete. The RG designation stands for Radio Guide; the U designation stands for Universal. The current military standard is MIL-SPEC MIL-C-17. MIL-C-17 numbers, such as "M17/75-RG214," are given for military cables and manufacturer's catalog numbers for civilian applications. However, the RG-series designations were so common for generations that they are still used, although critical users should be aware that since the handbook is withdrawn there is no standard to guarantee the electrical and physical characteristics of a cable described as "RG-# type". The RG designators are mostly used to identify compatible connectors that fit the inner conductor, dielectric, and jacket dimensions of the old RG-series cables.

In other words, it's like calling a tissue a Kleenex or a cotton swab a Q-tip. RGx is just a common, recognizable reference. Think of the term RCA plug/connector.
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post #17 of 17 Old 10-16-2012, 06:57 AM
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Okay, cool. Good find. wink.gif

From the May 2000 issue of Communications Technology:

"The subject of the origin of the RG-x designation for coaxial cables came up in an SCTE-List discussion in June 1998. The consensus seemed to indicate that "RG" stands for radio grade or radio guide, but the question wasn't really resolved. Rex Porter, editor-in-chief of IC's sister publication Communications Technology, commented that RG originally stood for radio (government) grade. As the commercial sector began to manufacture RG-type cables, the "government" designation was dropped in favor of radio grade. This was in part because of the concern that RG-designated cables that had not been tested for compliance with MIL-C-17 might be interpreted as MIL-SPEC cables when in fact they were not, so they were simply called RG-type, with RG standing for radio grade.

When this discussion appeared on the SCTE-List, I did a little research and came up with the following. I tracked down the "Army-Navy List of Preferred Cables," which was derived from "RF Transmission Lines and Fittings," MIL-HDBK-216 (4 January 1962, revised 18 May 1965). As a side note, requirements for listed cables can be found separately in MIL-C-17.

The "Army-Navy List of Preferred Cables" didn't specifically define the acronym "RG" but included 75-ohm cables (the common impedance for coaxial cables used in cable TV networks) among the many listed. These were classified as "JAN Type RG-" cables. RG was shown as an indicator, applicable to the family name "cables, RF bulk."

Even after digging up this information, there was still some question as to just what "RG" means. I then contacted Edwards Publishing, the company that published "The Encyclopedia of Connectors," a multi-volume reference series based on industry standards, MIL-SPEC documents and similar material. “RG" was an arbitrary designation for the family name "cables, RF bulk," much like "UG" was an arbitrary designation for the family name "connectors," according to an individual with whom I spoke at Edwards
Publishing.

A contributor to the SCTE-List discussion on this subject referenced a late 1960s version of the "RCA Field Engineers Technical Manual" and found this description:

Component indicator: RG
Family name: cables and transmission lines, bulk, RF
Definition: RF cable, waveguides, etc. without terminals

Yet another SCTE-List subscriber said a US Navy spokesperson told him that the designations were indeed arbitrary, because the military supposedly had huge lists of multi-letter designations for all kinds of materials, supplies, hardware and parts. That cables wound up with the RG designation, was a coincidence, according to that particular source.

Whether or not the designations really are arbitrary is open to debate. Anecdotal evidence suggests RG originally was an acronym for radio government (and later radio grade); the UG designation for connectors is "universal grade;" and the /U in many of the RG cable part numbers simply stands for "universal." Even so, I'm going to have to say the jury is still out on this one.

CIAO!

Ed N.
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