Thinking about going back to DirecTV will snowy winters be a problem? - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 13 Old 12-07-2012, 10:41 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
doozer12's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 166
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I use to have DirecTV for years and was always happy with them. This is when I lived in Florida over 5 years ago. SInce than, I have moved to Maine (BRRR) and have been with TW cable because we have been renting. We are now buying a house and I was thinking about going back to DirecTV but I am concerned about the reception especially with iuce and snow.

Living in Florida I had to deal with the occasional rain fade, but it wasnt really an issue. Is ice and snow similar, worse or not an issue?

Thanks!
doozer12 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 13 Old 12-07-2012, 11:01 AM
Super Moderator
 
DrDon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Metro Detroit
Posts: 12,503
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked: 218
There are soooo many variables. If you get a dead-on dish aim, that helps. If you place the dish where it's blocked from the wind or snow, THAT helps. I'm on my 6th year with a "fairly well" aimed 5-LNB dish in Detroit and I think I may have had 2 or 3 instances where I lost signal. In all cases, it was still snowing. Signal came back upon cleared skies with snow still in the dish.

In KY, I had the thing mounted within arm's reach, so I could just go brush the thing off. This one's unreachable even with a ladder. If you can mount it where you can get TO it, that helps with a lot of issues. I'm on lot that's wooded to my south, so I can't do that.

Walking the fine line between jaw-dropping and a plain ol' yawn.
DrDon is offline  
post #3 of 13 Old 12-07-2012, 05:17 PM
AVS Special Member
 
ProjectSHO89's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 2,522
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked: 60
I have a 10' pipe with a brush duct-taped to it. I need it every time it snows....
ProjectSHO89 is online now  
post #4 of 13 Old 12-07-2012, 08:59 PM
Super Moderator
 
DrDon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Metro Detroit
Posts: 12,503
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked: 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProjectSHO89 View Post

I have a 10' pipe with a brush duct-taped to it. I need it every time it snows....
I thought I was the only one who did that. But once I had to move the dish higher (tree growth), it no longer reaches.

Walking the fine line between jaw-dropping and a plain ol' yawn.
DrDon is offline  
post #5 of 13 Old 12-10-2012, 09:10 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Beerstalker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Peoria, IL
Posts: 1,978
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 23
As the others have mentioned wet, sticky, heavy snow can sometimes cause an issue. But it's usually as easy as brushing the snow off the dish to take care of the problem. So if you can it is best to put the dish in a place where you can access it easily.

Otherwise I have heard of others using a broom or brush attached to a pole, a super soaker or hose to spray the dish with water to melt the snow off, and other things like that.

Finally, if it really becomes an issue, you can get a dish heater. A dish heater sticks to the reflector of the dish and uses electricity to heat the dish enough so any snow or ice that sticks to it melts and runs off. I believe this is one of the popular ones.
http://www.solidsignal.com/pview.asp?mc=02&p=HSSLNGRFKIT&d=Perfect-Vision-Hotshot-Satellite-Antenna-Heating-Element--28-x-20-Inch-for-DIRECTVs-Slim-Line-AU9-AT9-DTV66E-.74-Raven-and-Prodelin-Dish-(HSSLNGRFKIT)&c=SatelliteComponents&sku=

If you want to know more about this I highly recommend you check out DBSTalk.com. It is AVSForum's sister site dedicated to satellite TV service, hardware, installation, questions, etc. I know there are a few threads around there with info like this, people talking/recommending the heaters, etc.
Beerstalker is offline  
post #6 of 13 Old 12-12-2012, 12:12 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
doozer12's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 166
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Thanks for all the info and insight on this. I will look into the dish heater. I also have the WAF to think about... The first time I tell her that she has to go outside and brush off the dish it will definately be the last day of satellite for me... I use cable with an HTPC and that isnt always reliable. If she is home during the day, I can count on that being the one day in months that the HTPC acts up...

Also, there are alot of trees at the new place and since its winter, I cant really see just how much of the sky I will be able to see with all the trees. I may just have to stick with cable... God, I hate cable..mad.gif
doozer12 is offline  
post #7 of 13 Old 12-16-2012, 06:10 AM
Advanced Member
 
Doctego's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Central Jersey
Posts: 738
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by doozer12 View Post

Thanks for all the info and insight on this. I will look into the dish heater. I also have the WAF to think about... The first time I tell her that she has to go outside and brush off the dish it will definately be the last day of satellite for me... I use cable with an HTPC and that isnt always reliable. If she is home during the day, I can count on that being the one day in months that the HTPC acts up...
Also, there are alot of trees at the new place and since its winter, I cant really see just how much of the sky I will be able to see with all the trees. I may just have to stick with cable... God, I hate cable..mad.gif

This is often overlooked. People get their dish installed in the fall or winter and then have reception issues in the spring. Good luck.

We are here to help you. Please help us to help you. If you provide incomplete information, at best, we can give you an incomplete response.
Doctego is offline  
post #8 of 13 Old 12-16-2012, 06:23 AM
Senior Member
 
jpcamaro70's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 379
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 25
In the many years I've had directv, I've only had one issue with snow on the dish blocking the signal and i live in NY. It was very dangerous brushing it off as it's on my roof and during a storm. But still, very rare for me.

My Gear
jpcamaro70 is offline  
post #9 of 13 Old 12-16-2012, 07:29 AM
AVS Special Member
 
egnlsn's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Taylorsville, UT
Posts: 2,219
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 31
Pool broom does wonders. Have to use it at least once per season.

CIAO!

Ed N.
egnlsn is online now  
post #10 of 13 Old 12-16-2012, 09:21 AM
Senior Member
 
dclark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 425
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 15
I usually have one or two nights out of the year where I have to brush the snow, but I have had years where I had to do this maybe 10 days and often as every 30 minutes. You know it is time to go out and brush when you see a glitch- signal strength is near gone. We get sierra cement snow- heavy, water rich snow that is a real pain to shovel, nothing like the powdery stuff you see in the Subaru commercials!
Now, my dish is where I can't access with a brush.Solutions;
1) Heated dish. I have one with a heater built in, can't use it as it is the old style, I could try to drill out the welds and JB Weld it to my current dish. Back when I used it, it worked well.
2) Get an ota (over the air ) tuner. Most of what we watch is network stuff anyhow and the antenna has never failed us.Plus, we don't go to the recorded playlist to find nothing recorded due to snow.
Another benefit to the ota tuner is much better pq.

If we get a real bad snow storm, we have ota reception and on demand stuff which mirrors much of what is on the sat transmission. Unless we lose internet or a wind storm knocks down my giant antenna (hasn't happened yet in the 10 years I have had that antenna), I'm good.
dclark is offline  
post #11 of 13 Old 12-16-2012, 09:57 AM
Senior Member
 
Star Hawk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 207
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
I live in a mountainous region at an elevation of ca. 2165 meters. I had cable TV for many years until I got HDTV. I got tired of the cable TV company's excuses for lost channels and macro-blocking. Not only that, they only provided a handful of HDTV channels compared to Directv. So a few years ago I switched to Directv and have been a happy camper ever since. Oh sure, especially where I live, snow can be a major problem regardless of who your service provider is.

Before the Directv installer came out, I ordered a Slimline Satellite Dish Heater for both the reflector and feed horn. The satellite dish heater works like a charm. The heater has thermostat control and stays on 24/7. The snow rarely accumulates on the reflector and feedhorn. It certainly can however during the most intense winter storms. Nothing can withstand those. Besides the power usually goes out any way. However, along the arm leading out to the feed horn snow tends to accumulate but never builds up to where it blocks the reflector and feed horn though. When the ice sickles get up to 0.5 to 0.8 meter long hanging from the feed horn support arm, I do go up on a ladder and gently knock them off just in case they weigh enough to cause the satellite dish to deflect. Of course when the power goes out, the satellite dish heater goes off too. Then snow tends to accumulate on the reflector and feed horn during heavy snowfall. So, during those rare times I do have to go up a ladder and brush the snow off the reflector. Often, because the reflector has some latent heat, the snow brushes off like water off a duck's back.

The long and short of it is this. Except during really severe weather, I get all my channels from Directv. I can tell you this. I will never go back to cable TV.
Star Hawk is offline  
post #12 of 13 Old 12-16-2012, 10:24 AM
Senior Member
 
Star Hawk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 207
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
I had cable TV for many years until I got HDTV. I got tired of the cable TV company's excuses for lost channels and macro-blocking. Not only that, they only provided a handful of HDTV channels compared to Directv. So a few years ago I switched to Directv and have been a happy camper ever since. Before the Directv installer came out, I ordered a Slimline Satellite Dish Heater for both the reflector and feed horn. He not only installed the Directv equipment but also the satellite dish heater along with running the wiring to my garage for a small fee. The satellite dish heater works like a charm. The heater has thermostat control and stays on 24/7. The snow rarely accumulates on the reflector and feedhorn. It certainly can however during the most intense winter storms. Nothing can withstand those. Besides the power usually goes out any way. However, along the arm leading out to the feed horn snow tends to accumulate but never builds up to where it blocks the reflector and feed horn though. When the ice sickles get up to 0.5 to 0.8 meter long hanging from the feed horn support arm, I do go up on a ladder and gently knock them off just in case they weigh enough to cause the satellite dish to deflect. Of course when the power goes out, the satellite dish heater goes off too. Then snow tends to accumulate on the reflector and feed horn during heavy snowfall. So, during those rare times I do have to go up a ladder and brush the snow off the reflector. Often, because the reflector has some latent heat, the snow brushes off like water off a duck's back.

The long and short of it is this. Except during really severe weather, I get all my channels from Directv. I can tell you this. I will never go back to cable TV.
Star Hawk is offline  
post #13 of 13 Old 12-16-2012, 04:00 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Scooper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Youngsville, NC USA
Posts: 5,058
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 15
It's been a couple winters since we have had enough snow to worry about losing satellite reception, but if it is too dangerous to go up on my relatively flat roof and brush snow off - I'll rely on OTA. TV is NOT worth risking your life over - If even OTA won't work - I'll just use the radio and the internet for entertainment / news/ information.

You CAN put antennas on your owned and/or controlled property...
http://www.fcc.gov/mb/facts/otard.html

Being A Beacon of Knowledge in the darkness of FUD
Scooper is offline  
Reply HDTV Technical

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off