UHF signal reception clearer during rain - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 8 Old 10-10-2013, 12:50 AM - Thread Starter
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My TV antenna received very signicantly stronger UHF signal during rains. This is the exact opposite of what is usually the norm. Can anyone give me any reasons why it's so? Is it because my antenna has some wires in it becoming rusty and hence loses contact during normal days, while the rain water establishes back the connection. I have rather poor reception on non-rain days from that UHF channel.

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post #2 of 8 Old 10-10-2013, 03:16 AM
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Depends on clouds and weather conditions. Sometimes rainy days I get better UHF signals; other times reception is worse.
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post #3 of 8 Old 10-10-2013, 06:09 AM - Thread Starter
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For mine, the rainy days always bring great reception, i did not see any occasion where it rains and the UHF channel getting worse. So it's the clouds or something that helps the signal, seems more like it, compared to my theory about the water connecting loose parts..you think?

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post #4 of 8 Old 10-10-2013, 06:36 AM
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Could be a number of reasons. You didn't include a location or a TV Fool report, so anything we tell you is just speculation.

Could be that the storm is attenuating interference.. multipath or a distant station. Weather fronts play havoc with signals in a number of ways and on different bands. Ask anyone near you with a ham license.

Also note that, unless you're using an actual spectrum analyzer, your signal meter is probably just giving you an inverse error-correction reading. Most of the "signal meters" in digital televisions give a reading based on error correction and not actual signal strength. Therefore, removing interference would make your reading go from, say, 60% to 80%.

Walking the fine line between jaw-dropping and a plain ol' yawn.
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post #5 of 8 Old 10-10-2013, 07:10 AM - Thread Starter
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Not sure where the usual location the users here are at, but I'm not in the States or any Western countries. I actually live on a slightly more elevated area, sort of a hilltop in an urban area. Our place here don't have HDTV yet. So my UHF and VHF antenna combo is for what I believe is analogue transmission on terrestrial TV.

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post #6 of 8 Old 10-10-2013, 08:52 AM
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I think this is where OTA reception gets frustrating for some because there sometimes just doesn't seem to be any rhyme or reason why some folks have issues and others don't. For us, we live 50 miles or so from the towers (excellent LOS) and weather has no effect on our reception at all. It can be very stormy and rainy, windy, or 105 F outside and our reception never wavers, and our roof-mounted antenna is almost 30 years old! 5 or 10 miles to the East or West of us, and folks have weather-related issues.
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post #7 of 8 Old 10-10-2013, 12:35 PM
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When I was young living in Garland, Texas I used to mess with TV Dxing or receiving VHF-TV signals from far away. I found if the signals tends to fade some then clear up then fade again, the antenna needs to be higher.

When it rains the TV signal is increased nearer the ground. Think of the rain as a large rather flat metal bowl turned upside down holding the TV signal closer to the ground. This is a sign you may need a higher gain antenna or adding a preamp near the antenna may also help.

If you using a outdoor antenna using 50 foot or more of coax you can add a preamp at the antenna and overcome the signal loss in the coax to increase your picture quality.

I'm assuming your using a outdoor antenna and not a indoor amplified one.
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post #8 of 8 Old 10-10-2013, 05:24 PM
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Our antenna is 30' from ground level, sitting on top of about a 12' mast at the apex of our roof, on a single story home. The roof is metal, the RG-6 coax run is about 90'. No pre-amp at the antenna and only a signal booster in the garage where the coax comes in, gets split to 2 tv's, and then goes on to the house via the builder installed RG-56 coax.
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