NO SIGNAL Winegard HDP-269 - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 21 Old 06-28-2014, 03:43 PM - Thread Starter
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NO SIGNAL Winegard HDP-269

Today I hooked up my HDP-269 Winegard remote amplifier box that I recently purchased.
I went from getting an ok signal with the old amplifier shown in picture to no signal with the new Winegard amp.
Can you give me any ideas what may be wrong.
I used the coax wire that came with the unit to hook up the Antenna to the Winegard box(antenna input),
I bought new 100’ RCA RG6 cable that goes from the Winegard box (to power supply) to Winegard PS-1403 (ANT connection)
A 6’ RG6U cable runs from Winegard PS-1403 (TV connection) to TV.
A 6’ RG6U cable runs from Winegard PS-1403 (PWR in) to power supply.

I need help.

I have a good Fluke multi-meter and the ability to test, just not sure what how to test.
Can you help?
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post #2 of 21 Old 06-28-2014, 05:21 PM
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Welcome to the forum.

What antenna are you using that I see on top of the mast in your photo?

What does your tvfool reception report look like?

If you can not measure it, you can not improve it.
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post #3 of 21 Old 06-28-2014, 05:29 PM
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That would appear to be an antenna that already has an amplifier internally mounted. Probably the one that Monoprice sells as their #4730 . The "old amplifier" you showed is actually the power supply for the amp inside the antenna. Without the power supply properly attached, the antenna with integrated amp turns into a brick.

You cannot add (or replace) an external pre-amp to one of those, it doesn't (and cannot work.

Last edited by ProjectSHO89; 06-28-2014 at 05:32 PM.
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post #4 of 21 Old 06-28-2014, 05:46 PM
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I agree with ProjectSHO89.
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post #5 of 21 Old 06-28-2014, 06:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keyboarddave View Post
I have a good Fluke multi-meter and the ability to test, just not sure what how to test.
Can you help?
First I would bypass the primp with a barrel connector and the power off and you should receive something. If you do then preamp is probably bad. You can measure the voltages as outlined below to see if that tells you anything. It may or may not.

I've attached a marked up photo of my HDP269 circuit board so you can measure the voltages. You'll need a small screwdriver to pop of the back. Then you'll need a pair of needle-nose pliers to loosen the nuts on the F connectors. Then you can use a very small screwdriver to reach in and spin the nuts off the connectors.

Connect the power to the preamp.

With your DMM measure between the blue and black arrows. That should be +8.0V and indicates the voltage regulator is working. Measure between the red and black arrows. Mine measures +5.8 volts but my amplifier (labeled "A") has a partial failure. I think though that 5-6V should be right and indicates the amplifier is drawing current. It should not measure 0V (amp shorted) or 8V (amp open).
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post #6 of 21 Old 06-29-2014, 03:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ProjectSHO89 View Post
That would appear to be an antenna that already has an amplifier internally mounted. Probably the one that Monoprice sells as their #4730 . The "old amplifier" you showed is actually the power supply for the amp inside the antenna. Without the power supply properly attached, the antenna with integrated amp turns into a brick.

You cannot add (or replace) an external pre-amp to one of those, it doesn't (and cannot work.
Yes, I also agree although I did not recognize the antenna. Now that you have a nice preamp and all of the cable, why don't you replace that antenna with something a bit more professional? Again, post your TV Fool chart and we will recommend some options. You must not have been fully satisfied with your reception or you would not be experimenting with it at this time.
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post #7 of 21 Old 06-29-2014, 04:10 AM
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You could also move your new preamp to after where you're inserting power for the orignal amp, but like others have suggested, it might more sense to get a better gain antenna.
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post #8 of 21 Old 06-29-2014, 04:55 AM - Thread Starter
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Grazie millione,

You guys are wright. The antenna I bought from HOME DEPOT (Futura HDTV Outdoor Antenna by GE) has an internal amplifier. just assumed the amp was the little in-line piece...
My goal with the Winegard HDP-269 is to free near AC power requirment.

I am reinstalling everything like it was and regrouping.

It is still under debate where to mont a bigger and better antenna.
Any antenna recomendations.

Here is my TVfool


http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wr...e1c64c00655097

Thanks again...
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post #9 of 21 Old 06-29-2014, 05:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bac522 View Post
You could also move your new preamp to after where you're inserting power for the orignal amp, but like others have suggested, it might more sense to get a better gain antenna.
Do not double-amplify the signal. Waste of an amp and usually ,make things worse.


Quote:
Originally Posted by :
to free near AC power requirment.
Unfortunately, that doesn't make any sense.

You have the potential for reception from either Baton Rouge or New Orleans. Which one do you want the most?
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post #10 of 21 Old 06-29-2014, 05:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ProjectSHO89 View Post
Do not double-amplify the signal. Waste of an amp and usually ,make things worse.
Yes and no, if it's a low gain amp to begin with, doesn't hurt to try, granted you're amplifying noise further, but I've done it in some cases and did see an improvement. Other times, I agree, signals got worst...ideally better to get a stronger antenna and then pre amp if necessary.
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post #11 of 21 Old 06-29-2014, 10:40 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ProjectSHO89 View Post
Do not double-amplify the signal. Waste of an amp and usually ,make things worse.




Unfortunately, that doesn't make any sense.

You have the potential for reception from either Baton Rouge or New Orleans. Which one do you want the most?
New Orleans is most desirable.

With the little cheap setup I have today, on a good day, we get 30+ channels which includes New Orleans, Baton Rouge, and Mississippi.
On a bad day we get less than 5 channels, which is mostly from Baton Rouge.

Would like to be able to get all stations from New Orleans, Baton Rouge, Mississippi.

I removed the Winegard amp and placed the originail Power Supply on the TV end of my 100' RG6 line and everything is working as usual. About 4 channels today


thanks
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post #12 of 21 Old 06-29-2014, 10:51 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ProjectSHO89 View Post
Do not double-amplify the signal. Waste of an amp and usually ,make things worse.




Unfortunately, that doesn't make any sense.

You have the potential for reception from either Baton Rouge or New Orleans. Which one do you want the most?
I am looking online at th HD Stacker TV Antenna from Denny's (dennysantennaservice.com)
What do you think about that choice?

thanks

Last edited by keyboarddave; 06-29-2014 at 11:03 AM.
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post #13 of 21 Old 06-29-2014, 11:03 AM
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The Stacker is a lousy choice. It has those wide elements for low-VHF that are useless in your area.

If you want stations from both cities, you might as well install either an HD7698 or a 91XG/Y10-7-13 combo on a heavy duty rotor. If that low-power on channel 23 is on the air, you probably won't be able to use a pre-amp unless you suppress that channel.
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post #14 of 21 Old 06-29-2014, 11:16 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ProjectSHO89 View Post
The Stacker is a lousy choice. It has those wide elements for low-VHF that are useless in your area.

If you want stations from both cities, you might as well install either an HD7698 or a 91XG/Y10-7-13 combo on a heavy duty rotor. If that low-power on channel 23 is on the air, you probably won't be able to use a pre-amp unless you suppress that channel.
It's not price, but size that matters. I would like to be able to rotate, but 168" is way to big.

I am limited to mounting in the front of the side of my house. The roof of the house is metal.
After experimenting many antenna locations including the attic, the front South Eastern corner of the house workes best.
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post #15 of 21 Old 06-30-2014, 07:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keyboarddave View Post
It's not price, but size that matters. I would like to be able to rotate, but 168" is way to big.
If you are willing to rotate but worried about size, and no doubt wind load in your part of the country you could consider a UHF only 8 bay antenna such as the Channel Master 4224, the Winegard 8800 and the newly redesigned Antennas Direct DB4e.
Although not designed to received VHF, your CBS station on real channel 9 and ABC on 13 are both line-of -sight and most likely would easily decode. Besides you have CBS on channel 36 and ABC on 26 in New Orleans which you indicated you prefer anyway. I would not expect to get the PBS affiliate on real channel 11 with the above antennas. However you have PBS on UHF 25 in Baton Rouge and 18 in Mississippi.
If you were to add the weight of one of these antennas and the weight of a rotor onto that mast in your picture, I would support it with some guy wires.
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post #16 of 21 Old 07-01-2014, 10:00 AM - Thread Starter
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Thanks,

I am going to look into your recommendations.
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post #17 of 21 Old 07-01-2014, 10:22 AM - Thread Starter
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If you are willing to rotate but worried about size, and no doubt wind load in your part of the country you could consider a UHF only 8 bay antenna such as the Channel Master 4224, the Winegard 8800 and the newly redesigned Antennas Direct DB4e.
Although not designed to received VHF, your CBS station on real channel 9 and ABC on 13 are both line-of -sight and most likely would easily decode. Besides you have CBS on channel 36 and ABC on 26 in New Orleans which you indicated you prefer anyway. I would not expect to get the PBS affiliate on real channel 11 with the above antennas. However you have PBS on UHF 25 in Baton Rouge and 18 in Mississippi.
If you were to add the weight of one of these antennas and the weight of a rotor onto that mast in your picture, I would support it with some guy wires.
Is omni directional an option for my location? Something i would not have to rotate?
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post #18 of 21 Old 07-01-2014, 03:42 PM
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Omni antenna usually offer lousy reception in all directions.

Attempting to receive from two different directions is not a simple matter. You can give it a shot and see if it works for you.
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post #19 of 21 Old 07-01-2014, 03:49 PM
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I do not believe any knowledgeable members of this forum would recommend an omnidirectional antenna in any situation. Antennas are directional by nature and those that claim to be omnidirectional are actually a series of small antennas arranged in a circle. I have experimented with a few over the years and had better reception with a coat-hanger.
When signals are desired from two opposite directions a flat panel such as those cited above can be modified so that it receives off of the back as well as the front. However, Baton Rouge and New Orleans are at almost a 90 degree angle from your location so that is not an option.
Another option to avoid rotation is to have two completely separate antennas with separate lead-in cables and a switch to choose which signal is sent to the tuner. You could even continue to use your current antenna for Baton Rouge and set up a completely separate antenna for New Orleans.
Special and somewhat expensive devices can be used to insert one or even several channels from two antennas into one lead-in cable. In very rare instances a simple splitter is used backwards to tie two antennas together. I have never seen this lead to success, but it may be possible in very remote locations where there are just a few signals in the air.
Finally digital TV has presented an option that was not very desirable in the analog days. Many times a strong signal can be properly decoded from an antenna that is pointed in the wrong direction. This is possible due to the built in error correction schemes used in digital tuners. In the analog days an incorrectly aimed antenna would certainly cause "ghosts" and "snow". You could set up a quality antenna directed at New Orleans and may get at least the NBC affiliate out of Baton Rouge for alternate local news.
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post #20 of 21 Old 07-02-2014, 05:09 AM
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No matter what you do, you'll need a good bit of space for the UHF antenna anyway. And, you'll need some sort of high-band VHF for those channels as well.
So, why not try the HD Stacker?
Assuming the long elements on the Stacker's VHF section really are low-band VHF elements (at 60" wide, they likely are), why NOT use that one.......
Since you are around 50 miles from the TV stations, I'd guess that most of your FM Radio stations are about that same distance......the low-band elements would certainly help FM radio reception in that case. Just feed a split of the antenna to your FM Radio tuner.

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post #21 of 21 Old 07-02-2014, 12:14 PM
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I believe that HD Stacker is specially made by Winegard. So a good antenna if it meets your criteria. Although in many situations, the 7698 by Winegard would probably be a better choice for HiVHF and UHF. And if all band is indeed needed, there is always the 8200.
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