The Official AVS Antenna and Related Hardware Topic! - Page 19 - AVS Forum
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post #541 of 16271 Old 11-10-2004, 08:22 AM
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Originally posted by dkyork
Should I get one of those things that tell you the degrees or will a simple compass do for aligning the antenna?

What, other than a compass, tells you the degrees? You point it north, you can figure out which direction is 270 degrees, right?

As for aligning an antenna with a compass (or any other magentic device) I would urge caution. Aiming an antenna precisely usually cannot be done visually. Hold your fist out at arm's length and see how much distance it covers. That's approximately 10 degrees. With a directional antenna, 5 degrees is more than enough to impair reception.

I always suggest having a television up with you while aiming, or be able to speak with someone (cell phone/walkie-talkie) who can see the reception guide you. That way you're not guessing at all - you know you've found the best direction for the antenna.
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post #542 of 16271 Old 11-10-2004, 08:27 AM
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Originally posted by Nitewatchman
While it is true the signal itself won't get any "stronger" than is the case at the antenna, it is possible that a preamp CAN lower the over all noise floor that front end of receiver "sees", therefore, in a practical sense, a good preamp(in the right circumstances) can "raise" the overall S/N ratio.

This would seem to confirm what I claimed: that a preamplifier really only overcomes line loss. (Granted, there's a small amount of receiver-induced noise, but there's also a small amount of noise induced by the preamplifier's input itself. Which is greater depends on a variety of things, but I've read claims that a preamplifier's induced noise level is not dramatically different from most tuners.)
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post #543 of 16271 Old 11-10-2004, 09:21 AM
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Originally posted by sregener
This would seem to confirm what I claimed: that a preamplifier really only overcomes line loss. (Granted, there's a small amount of receiver-induced noise, but there's also a small amount of noise induced by the preamplifier's input itself. Which is greater depends on a variety of things, but I've read claims that a preamplifier's induced noise level is not dramatically different from most tuners.)

There's about 100 feet from my antenna to my tv. How many feet before I experience db loss?
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post #544 of 16271 Old 11-10-2004, 09:36 AM
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Quote:


Originally posted by sregener
This would seem to confirm what I claimed: that a preamplifier really only overcomes line loss. (Granted, there's a small amount of receiver-induced noise, but there's also a small amount of noise induced by the preamplifier's input itself. Which is greater depends on a variety of things, but I've read claims that a preamplifier's induced noise level is not dramatically different from most tuners.)

I don't know what the typical noise figure is for your run of the mill ATSC receiver/tuner, as the below info is talking about NTSC tuner. but FWIW, I copied the below quotes from the link with some of the sections I suggested for reading which I provided in an earlier post, but I suggest you check also out the remainder of the relevant sections at this link : ( http://www.geocities.com/toddemslie/UHF-TV-DX.html )

:quote

"Let's assume that we are not using any UHF masthead preamplifier and there is 4dB coax cable loss between the antenna and TV:

1. Balun signal loss 1dB.
2. Coax cable loss 4dB.
3. TV tuner noise figure 10dB.
4. System noise figure 16dB (1+4+10 = 15).
5. A 15dB system noise figure is a poor receiving system for deep fringe UHF TV reception.

Now let's assume that we are using a 2dB noise figure UHF masthead preamplifier, 1dB loss balun, and there is 4dB coax cable loss between the antenna and TV. The following table will help you appreciate the significant improvement to weak signals by placing a low noise amplifier at the masthead:


Typical UHF TV tuner noise figure 10db 2610 deg Kelvin
20 meters of RG6 coax cable 4.0db 439deg kelvin
Typical balun transformer loss 1.0db 75deg kelvin
4 x belling lee connectors 0.25db 17deg kelvin
Total losses 15.25 dB 9000deg kelvin


In the above example the Receiver System Sensitivity equates to 15.25 dB or 9000 K°.

Now we will add a low noise preamplifier (LNA) right at the masthead (antenna terminals):

Masthead LNA 2.0db 150 deg kelvin
Typical balun transformer loss 1.0db 75deg kelvin
4 x belling lee connectors 0.25db 17deg kelvin
Total losses 3.25 dB 330 deg kelvin

Providing the gain of the LNA exceeds the losses between it and the receiver (TV set), the above losses are negligible.

In the above example (with a LNA at the antenna feed) the receiver system sensitivity equals 3.25 dB (330 °K). This translates to a very significant 12 dB improvement. In other words, your UHF antenna array equates to a net improvement of making the antenna FOUR times as large!

:end quote

Jeff
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post #545 of 16271 Old 11-10-2004, 10:32 AM
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Does anyone have suggestion on an antenna to receive freq's 7,18, 24,34,& 42. I am looking for something that is not very "tall" for I will be mounting it in my apt for at least a couple months. I looked at the winegard HD7210P . Any suggestions on this or a similar product?

forgot .. i am about 15 miles from towers

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post #546 of 16271 Old 11-10-2004, 11:18 AM
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has anyone tried the new PA 16 from ant. direct? How does it compare with a CM 7777 or 7778?

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post #547 of 16271 Old 11-10-2004, 05:03 PM
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Yes, I agree. In fact, I believe I said that in first sentence of last post.

Yes, you did. Sorry about that.
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post #548 of 16271 Old 11-10-2004, 07:05 PM
 
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Quote:


Originally posted by Nitewatchman
I don't know what the typical noise figure is for your run of the mill ATSC receiver/tuner, as the below info is talking about NTSC tuner. but FWIW, I copied the below quotes from the link with some of the sections I suggested for reading which I provided in an earlier post, but I suggest you check also out the remainder of the relevant sections at this link : ( http://www.geocities.com/toddemslie/UHF-TV-DX.html )

:quote

"Let's assume that we are not using any UHF masthead preamplifier and there is 4dB coax cable loss between the antenna and TV:

1. Balun signal loss 1dB.
2. Coax cable loss 4dB.
3. TV tuner noise figure 10dB.
4. System noise figure 16dB (1+4+10 = 15).
5. A 15dB system noise figure is a poor receiving system for deep fringe UHF TV reception.

Now let's assume that we are using a 2dB noise figure UHF masthead preamplifier, 1dB loss balun, and there is 4dB coax cable loss between the antenna and TV. The following table will help you appreciate the significant improvement to weak signals by placing a low noise amplifier at the masthead:


Typical UHF TV tuner noise figure 10db 2610 deg Kelvin
20 meters of RG6 coax cable 4.0db 439deg kelvin
Typical balun transformer loss 1.0db 75deg kelvin
4 x belling lee connectors 0.25db 17deg kelvin
Total losses 15.25 dB 9000deg kelvin


In the above example the Receiver System Sensitivity equates to 15.25 dB or 9000 K°.

Now we will add a low noise preamplifier (LNA) right at the masthead (antenna terminals):

Masthead LNA 2.0db 150 deg kelvin
Typical balun transformer loss 1.0db 75deg kelvin
4 x belling lee connectors 0.25db 17deg kelvin
Total losses 3.25 dB 330 deg kelvin

Providing the gain of the LNA exceeds the losses between it and the receiver (TV set), the above losses are negligible.

In the above example (with a LNA at the antenna feed) the receiver system sensitivity equals 3.25 dB (330 °K). This translates to a very significant 12 dB improvement. In other words, your UHF antenna array equates to a net improvement of making the antenna FOUR times as large!

:end quote

THIS LOOKS LIKE WORK THAT BOB COOPER DID YEARS AGO PROVING HOW MUCH A MAST MOUNTED PREAMPLIFIER DOES ACTUALLY INCREASE THE ANTENNAS PERFORMANCE. I AM A PERSONAL FRIEND OF BOBS AND ANYONE ON HERE WANTING TO KNOW THE TRUTH OF PREAMPLIFIERS SHOULD READ HIS TECH ARTICLES.
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post #549 of 16271 Old 11-11-2004, 03:25 AM
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I installed my PR8800 in my attic and without an amp was able to pick up my local OTA stations from DC with no problem. Signal was above normal but not pegged. I bought the CM7775 amp based on my past experiences.

I hook up the power source (to TV , from Antenna) I then go in the attic and hook up the pre amp and the signal drops. Is there a short on the line? I have reterminated my drops multiple times and even tried a different CM7775 and the same thing happens. What would effect the power going from the source to the preamp? Shielding touching a termination? Interconnects?

I am at a loss. My signal is decent without it but I know these amps can get me pegged in the good range.


Any and ALL help would be appreciated.
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post #550 of 16271 Old 11-11-2004, 06:20 AM
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Quote:


Originally posted by EricfromVA
I installed my PR8800 in my attic and without an amp was able to pick up my local OTA stations from DC with no problem. Signal was above normal but not pegged. I bought the CM7775 amp based on my past experiences.

[...]I am at a loss. My signal is decent without it but I know these amps can get me pegged in the good range.

Preamplifiers are not magic. They don't always improve reception, nor do they even leave it the same in some cases. Among the possibilities:

1) Your preamplifier is getting overloaded because the db level is too high. (All preamps have a maximum output and "clip" if the signal becomes stronger than this.)

2) Your preamplifier is amplifying weak multipath signals that were below your receiver's noise threshold, increasing the errors in the bitstream.

I'm sure there are others, but these are the obvious ones. Keep in mind that "signal strength" on your HD set is an improperly labeled guide. It is really a "signal quality" measure. As long as you're getting breakup-free reception, your reception is already as good as it's going to get. More signal strength on the meter doesn't get you a better picture.

Check your analog UHF signals with and without the preamplifier and see if you can tell what the problem is. My personal recommendation would be to return the preamp and enjoy your quality reception without worrying about "pegging" out the meter.
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post #551 of 16271 Old 11-11-2004, 06:41 AM
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I have decided that I need a rooftop antenna. Both a Silver Sensor and the RS indoor antenna I have tried just won't lock reliably enough on all the local channels. While I have cable HD, I don't expect to see the CBS and Fox stations added any time in the near to intermediate future so need reliable OTA reception. My TV is a 2002 Mitsubishi RPTV with a builit-in HD OTA receiver. It does not have signal strength metering.

I live in Goochland, near the J Sargent Reynolds campus. I have checked the usual antenna internet spots but the answers there are not specific enough for me.

I have four questions that I am looking for help on:

1. What outdoor antennas are people finding effective? I would like to also receive Charlottesville stations (can get the HD signal now from the NBC affiliate on an indoor antenna but not reliably) and will probably add a rotator to the antenna.

2. Do you think I will need an amplifier?

3. Can anyone recommend an installer? I am too short on skills to do the install myself. You can PM me on this last question, if you don't want to be seen as endorsing anyone.

4. What should a good antenna, rotator and maybe amplifier cost me, installation included?

Thanks in advance for any help you can give me.

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post #552 of 16271 Old 11-11-2004, 09:06 AM
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Quote:


Originally posted by JazzGuyy
1. What outdoor antennas are people finding effective? I would like to also receive Charlottesville stations (can get the HD signal now from the NBC affiliate on an indoor antenna but not reliably) and will probably add a rotator to the antenna.

2. Do you think I will need an amplifier?

3. Can anyone recommend an installer? I am too short on skills to do the install myself. You can PM me on this last question, if you don't want to be seen as endorsing anyone.

4. What should a good antenna, rotator and maybe amplifier cost me, installation included?

1. You can read this thread for lots of antenna recommendations. Generally speaking, you can't go wrong with the Channel Master 4228 or AntennasDirect DB8. Both are solid UHF performers, highly directional, with a lot of gain and good front-to-back ratio. (If you don't know why those things matter, don't worry. They're all what you want in an antenna.) Add to that the relatively compact size of these antennas, and they get recommended a lot.

2. An amplifier is not recommended when you're within 20 miles of the stations, or you have a large number of high-powered FM broadcasters in the area. If you're hiring an installer, have them bring a good low-noise model (the Channel Master 777x lineup is a great choice) with them and see if you need it. How will you know? Look for snow on the analog UHF channels in your area. If you have lots of snow, a preamp is a good idea. If you have even the faintest ghosting, forgo the preamp.

3. You may have more luck asking for an installer in the thread specific to your market.

4. A Channel Master 4228 runs about $50 online (plus shipping.) A 7775 preamp costs $55. A Channel Master 9521A rotor runs $70. Toss in a mast, 100' or so of RG-6 cabling, a mount, and some sundry items, and your materials cost shouldn't be more than $250. I couldn't guess what labor runs in your area.

Antennaweb.org thinks you're borderline (violet) for analog UHFs from Charlottesville, so your results may vary. The distance is small (35 miles or so) but there must be hills or directional antennas there that make it harder to receive them. Still, if you're getting a somewhat reliable signal indoors, you should be able to receive the same station from a rooftop reliably.
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post #553 of 16271 Old 11-11-2004, 08:23 PM
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15.1, 15.2, 15.3, 15.4 WHRO-DT PBS HAMPTON-NORFOLK 199° 28.2 Excellent 16
43.1, 43.2 WVBT-DT FOX VIRGINIA BEACH 200° 27.4 Excellent 29
10.1, 10.2, 10.3 WAVY-DT NBC PORTSMOUTH 200° 27.4 Excellent 31
33.1, 33.2 WTVZ-DT WB NORFOLK 199° 28.2 Excellent 38
3.1, 3.2 WTKR-DT CBS NORFOLK 199° 28.2 Excellent 40
13.1, 13.2 WVEC-DT ABC HAMPTON 195° 27.3 Excellent 41
49.1 WPXV-DT PAX NORFOLK 199° 28.2 Excellent 46
27.1 WGNT-DT UPN PORTSMOUTH 194° 27.7 Excellent 50

That my listing from antenna.org. How can I get 10.1 in clearly 24/7, but I can't get 43.1? They are the same degrees and the same distance. I don't understand. Can anyone help me? I still don't get 3.1 or 33.1. I get all the 15s, 10s, and sometimes 13s. None of the rest. IS this a distance problem? The results just aren't logical or I'm misunderstanding something about how antennas work. Any help appreciated. The 43.1 and 10.1 thing is really throwing me off.

Thanks,

Dale

Edit: D* installed a GS-2200 Winegard, which is currently up. I received in the mail today a 4228 and a 5 foot mast. I have yet to install it since I don't have the right roof mounts yet. I'm trying to install near my peak of the house, any suggestions welcome.

Edit #2: Also, this might be harder a task then I think it is. If so, can anyone recommend a good installer to mount this thing on my roof?
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post #554 of 16271 Old 11-11-2004, 08:47 PM
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I'm making my first venture into the foray of OTA reception.

I just bought a MyHD-120 ATSC card, replacing the FusionHDTV3-T card I bought two weeks ago (I wasn't satisfied with the PQ of the Fusion card).

Now, I've already done a bit of reception testing with the Fusion card and a Zenith Silver Sensor (which I also have since returned). I put the Silver Sensor in the attic pointing toward the HD antennas in my area (Austin) as indicated by antennaweb.org.

I think the results were pretty good, considering I'm about 14 miles from the antennas. I was able to get one station at 80% signal strength (according to the Fusion card) and another at 70%. Some of the others I couldn't tune at all (but antennaweb says a green antenna should do the trick).

So, I'm just looking for a little help to decide what antenna to get.

My local Fry's has a Channel Master 3017 in stock. Will that do the trick do you think? Will it pick up VHF channels pretty effectively as well (FOX is on channel 7). Will I run into trouble if I get *too* much antenna? (Is that even possible?)

Also, the MyHD card has two F-type inputs. Do I need two antennas if I want to use both inputs?

Thanks!
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post #555 of 16271 Old 11-12-2004, 06:59 AM
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which preamp would be recommended to use with a DB2 ?

Go Wildcats!
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post #556 of 16271 Old 11-12-2004, 07:26 AM
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Quote:


Originally posted by dkyork
43.1, 43.2 WVBT-DT FOX VIRGINIA BEACH 200° 27.4 Excellent 29
10.1, 10.2, 10.3 WAVY-DT NBC PORTSMOUTH 200° 27.4 Excellent 31

That my listing from antenna.org. How can I get 10.1 in clearly 24/7, but I can't get 43.1? They are the same degrees and the same distance. I don't understand. Can anyone help me?

A few possibilities exist.

First, WVBT's transmitter is 40 meters lower than WAVY's. If you're dealing with hills, it is entirely possibile that WVBT's signal is running smack into the hill (blocking line-of-sight) while WAVY's is clearing it.

Secondly, assuming both signals are blocked, different frequencies propogate in different ways, and some signals will be strong in one area and weak in another. Ultimately, you end up searching for a "pocket" where the most signals are hitting, a so-called "hot spot" and place your antenna there. It may be to the left or right of where you think it should be, or maybe up or down. UHF signals only move about 3' from peak to valley, so we're dealing with a pretty small area in which a stray signal could be found.

Third, you may be picking up a reflection on WVBT that you're not getting from WAVY. This is called multipath (because the signal travels over multiple paths before striking your antenna) and since the distances are unequal, the two signals are out-of-phase. Again, because different frequencies propogate differently, you may find a reflection on one frequency that you don't have on another. Multipath is known to confuse most digital receivers, and the level of multipath required may vary from place to place.

Fourth, WVBT is using a directional antenna, and if it malfunctioning, it may not be sending out the specified power in your direction. Check with the station engineer to verify that the transmitter is running at full power and that the directional pattern is operating normally.

Finally, you may have some form of interference that is causing problems on one frequency and not on another. If there is another station on a near frequency (one channel up or down) it can sometimes interfere with reception of another channel. Although this problem is greatly reduced with digital signals, there is some amount of "bleed" from one channel to the next.

Hope this helps you understand how things can be different. I don't know the topography between you and your desired stations.
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post #557 of 16271 Old 11-12-2004, 08:33 AM
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Winegard HD9095P vs.Antennasdirect 91XG
Location: South Haven,MI 49090
Desire:Maximum Uhf signals for OTA HD.Mainly South Bend,also 2 and
7 from Gun Lake,and any Chicago on the good days.
Additional tips welcome.Thanks to the Best
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post #558 of 16271 Old 11-12-2004, 09:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by bobbehr
Winegard HD9095P vs.Antennasdirect 91XG
Location: South Haven,MI 49090
Desire:Maximum Uhf signals for OTA HD.Mainly South Bend,also 2 and
7 from Gun Lake,and any Chicago on the good days.
Additional tips welcome.Thanks to the Best

Neither will do an acceptable job on channel 2. You *might* get away with trying to get 7 with a UHF-only, but that's not a guarantee. Your best bet would be to buy a VHF-only antenna to combine with one of the above choices and use a Channel Master #0549 (or a preamplifier with separate UHF and VHF inputs like the CM 7777) to combine the two.

If you haven't read my review of the AntennasDirect91XG, do so here:
http://www.geocities.com/figbert/91xg.html

The 9095 is a good choice. I can't say if it's better than the 91XG. Others have reported better results with the 91XG or the DB8, and some swear by the 9095. I think you'd best try them both and see which one works better in your particular location.
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post #559 of 16271 Old 11-12-2004, 05:22 PM
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Yea sorry ,
"also" after South Bend should have read "don't care about 2 or 7".
"and any Chicago" should read "any Uhf Chicago"
Poorly written post ,of course I don't expect any Vhf signals.
Many thank you's sregener.
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post #560 of 16271 Old 11-12-2004, 07:18 PM
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Grounding an antenna properly. Does the Winegard GS-2200 have grounding to the HD tuner? I looked at the Winegard D* installed and didn't see a copper grounding wire. I think when I put the 4228 in it's place, I'll need a copper grounding wire right?

thanks,

Dale
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post #561 of 16271 Old 11-12-2004, 07:29 PM
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http://www.mikeholt.com/documents/gr.../satellite.doc

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...hreadid=395088


AVSforum member Signal posted the following helpful sites. Dish and antenna masts have the same grounding requirements.


National Electrical Code - Search for "dish" http://forums.nfpa.org:8081/necfaq/necsrch.htm

The information there also applies to antenna grounding. In the 2002 code update, if a water pipe is used, it must be all metal and connected to the electrical panel within 5ft of where the pipe enters the building. The connection to the pipe from the lightning arrestor/ground block and from the antenna/dish mast must also be within 5ft of the pipe's entry.


Preventing Damage Due to Ground Potential Difference
http://www.cinergy.com/surge/ttip08.htm

PSIHQ - Grounding Requirements
http://www.psihq.com/iread/strpgrnd.htm

PolyPhaser Technical Information
http://www.polyphaser.com/ppc_technical.asp

Pat

While I may link to and mention products as examples, I don't recommend specific products.
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post #562 of 16271 Old 11-12-2004, 09:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by greywolf
http://www.mikeholt.com/documents/gr.../satellite.doc

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...hreadid=395088


AVSforum member Signal posted the following helpful sites. Dish and antenna masts have the same grounding requirements.


National Electrical Code - Search for "dish" http://forums.nfpa.org:8081/necfaq/necsrch.htm

The information there also applies to antenna grounding. In the 2002 code update, if a water pipe is used, it must be all metal and connected to the electrical panel within 5ft of where the pipe enters the building. The connection to the pipe from the lightning arrestor/ground block and from the antenna/dish mast must also be within 5ft of the pipe's entry.


Preventing Damage Due to Ground Potential Difference
http://www.cinergy.com/surge/ttip08.htm

PSIHQ - Grounding Requirements
http://www.psihq.com/iread/strpgrnd.htm

PolyPhaser Technical Information
http://www.polyphaser.com/ppc_technical.asp

Ugh, neither my Dish or OTA antenna is grounded. This is going to be fun. Guess I need to go buy about a 100 foot of copper wire and figure out how to ground these the best way.

Thanks for the links.

Dale
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post #563 of 16271 Old 11-13-2004, 05:41 AM
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Originally posted by dkyork
Ugh, neither my Dish or OTA antenna is grounded. This is going to be fun. Guess I need to go buy about a 100 foot of copper wire and figure out how to ground these the best way.

You can ground your antenna by connecting a short length of wire from the mast to the outer shealth of the coax cable, then ground the coax with a grounding block at the point closest to where it enters the house. Then you don't have so much cable to run.
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post #564 of 16271 Old 11-13-2004, 06:54 AM
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That wouldn't satisfy code requirements though. No. 10 copper, No. 8. aluminum, or No. 17 copper-clad steel or bronze is specified. Using coax with an attached messenger wire will meet code as it is 17ga copper clad steel or bronze. http://www.globe-mart.com/page/5/5722.htm shows an example.

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post #565 of 16271 Old 11-14-2004, 06:45 AM
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Quote:


Originally posted by greywolf
That wouldn't satisfy code requirements though. No. 10 copper, No. 8. aluminum, or No. 17 copper-clad steel or bronze is specified. Using coax with an attached messenger wire will meet code as it is 17ga copper clad steel or bronze. http://www.globe-mart.com/page/5/5722.htm shows an example.

That's good stuff Grey. I think I'll use that to run from my dish and OTA antenna, meet at the block and right on the other side of the wall is my circuit panel for the house. Sound like a good plan?

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post #566 of 16271 Old 11-14-2004, 06:47 AM
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Sounds workable. The odd thing though is sregener's idea actually provides a cleaner, lower resistance path to ground. Maybe the code writer's never considered it or they worried about poor connector installation. My only objection involves exposed coax connectors. I like mine out of the weather. OTOH, the contact hardware on ground clamps and blocks is pretty foolproof.

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post #567 of 16271 Old 11-14-2004, 05:42 PM
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I have a newbie antenna question....I bought a l UHF/VHF antenna for an attic mount. The problem arose when I attempted to orient this large antenna in the direction required but I can't turn it enough because of the VHF extensions. My question is since I'm only interested in UHF, can I fold those extensions inward and not have it affect the UHF performance?

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post #568 of 16271 Old 11-14-2004, 08:40 PM
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My question is since I'm only interested in UHF, can I fold those extensions inward and not have it affect the UHF performance?

Yes, just don't let any of the parts you fold in touch the rest of the antenna.
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post #569 of 16271 Old 11-15-2004, 07:20 AM
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Originally posted by greywolf
That wouldn't satisfy code requirements though. No. 10 copper, No. 8. aluminum, or No. 17 copper-clad steel or bronze is specified. Using coax with an attached messenger wire will meet code as it is 17ga copper clad steel or bronze. http://www.globe-mart.com/page/5/5722.htm shows an example.

As usual, code isn't written with common sense in mind.

If there is a lightning strike within 10' of your antenna (or, obviously, the antenna itself), all the electrical equipment in your house is likely to be fried no matter how well grounded it may be. Grounding is required not to take care of distributing electrical charges in such a circumstance, but to "bleed off" static buildup that is caused when charged wind particles are blown around a metal object.

Now, I'm not an electrician, but it seems to me that the amount of static buildup on an antenna can't be that much that it would require a #10 copper wire to carry the electrical charge. Thus, almost any wire should be sufficient to protect against the voltage differential between the ground and the metal object.

In my previous recommendation of attaching the grounding wire to the outer coax connection, there is no reason that you can't seal that connection using electrical tape, protecting it from the elements.

Of course, following my advice (or that of anyone else posting on the internet) is at your own risk, and I make no claims that my proposed solutions are effective, safe, or even a good idea. Caveat reader.
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post #570 of 16271 Old 11-15-2004, 08:04 AM
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I figure a lot of code regulations are written to support the trades rather than addressing actual safety and security issues. If 17ga copper coated steel is a good enough conductor to bleed off static, the shield of the coax is certainly even better. I always recommend people check local codes as they vary and noncompliance can cause problems with insurance and resale if not function. My personal irritations around local codes include not being able to use non-metallic sheathed electrical cable in any situation or plastic plumbing pipe in many situations even though they work fine and are accepted in most areas.

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