Comcast Technology Topic - Page 37 - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
Baselworld is only a few weeks away. Getting the latest news is easy, Click Here for info on how to join the Watchuseek.com newsletter list. Follow our team for updates featuring event coverage, new product unveilings, watch industry news & more!



Forum Jump: 
 55Likes
 
Thread Tools
Old 04-08-2016, 02:29 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Mark12547's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Salem, Oregon, United States, Earth
Posts: 1,748
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 608 Post(s)
Liked: 417
Quote:
Originally Posted by BiggAW View Post
4. Cost. TiVo is quite a bit cheaper, since you buy the hardware outright, don't have to pay monthly fees, and extra TVs are $150 one time, without recurring monthly fees.
Are you sure about that? When Comcast dropped the last of the analog channels where I live, I looked at Tivo but at that time Tivo required a monthly service fee or a substantial one-time service fee for use of the device. At that time the monthly fee was about two dollars under what Comcast charges for rental of a HD DVR, and that isn't considering the need of a CableCARD or shipping if the device fails to work.

My very humble setup:
Spoiler!
Mark12547 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 04-08-2016, 08:12 PM
Senior Member
 
klh007's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Annapolis, MD
Posts: 277
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Liked: 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by IronWaffle View Post
Thanks for this post. Very glad they've (finally) created a way to change the default GUIDE view. I was very surprised that it wasn't a feature when I switched from FiOS. X1, in my experience, is much better than FiOS (YMMV) but this always bugged me since the first thing I did was spend time creative favorites so I could skip around more easily. While it's a little thing, I'm very glad for it.

As to auto-extend, if I'm reading it right then this feature is only on select networks? I hope this shows up on more networks with time. I don't care for sports and it's annoying when a game goes long and, say, bumps Colbert later and screws up my DVR schedule. Again, a little thing.

Thanks again for posting this!
Yes PaulGo, thanks for your post, I just used the feature to lock in my "Favorites" as the default Guide view!

Kemper Holt
klh007 is online now  
Old 04-09-2016, 01:21 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Dartman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Oregon
Posts: 1,706
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Liked: 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulGo View Post
Comcast Simplifies X1 Activations

Additionally, the Comcast Labs section of X1 is now testing a “Default Guide View” component that enables subs to control and personalize the kind of content they see when pressing the Guide button of the remote. Using this test feature, customers can now use that button to select a particular guide view – such as HD Channels, Favorites, the X1 Trending guide, or the Kids guide view. Those various guide options can still be pulled up by pressing the Guide button twice.

At last check, Comcast has been deploying about 40,000 X1 boxes a day, with about 35% of its video base on the platform. The MSO expects to push that to 50% by year end.


http://www.multichannel.com/news/con...vations/403927
Just discovered that feature on my non DVR X1 box. I guess they listened to the few complaints about not having a permanent option to set the guide to favorites or HD or whatever. I had tried the hack but it expired after about 90 minutes so I again had to scroll to favorites while checking the guide. Its nice that they are actively adding features and testing new ideas like some of the media players I use now.
The old boxes are pretty much locked in except they always gave you the option for favorites only, or another favorite, native resolution, even if you had to go into the service menu to set it.
Dartman is offline  
Old 04-09-2016, 07:15 PM
AVS Special Member
 
BiggAW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 1,615
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 366 Post(s)
Liked: 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulGo View Post
In my area you pay an outlet charge of $9.95 (less a $2.50 credit) for each cable card device. With TIVO don't you pay a monthly subscription fee?
You pay for each CableCard that you have. If you have a Premiere XL4, Roamio, Roamio Pro, or Bolt, you can add up to 9 TiVo Minis without any additional subscription fees, since the TiVo Minis don't have QAM tuners and borrow the tuners and CableCard from the host DVR. The TiVo Minis are $150 outright, no monthly fees.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark12547 View Post
Are you sure about that? When Comcast dropped the last of the analog channels where I live, I looked at Tivo but at that time Tivo required a monthly service fee or a substantial one-time service fee for use of the device. At that time the monthly fee was about two dollars under what Comcast charges for rental of a HD DVR, and that isn't considering the need of a CableCARD or shipping if the device fails to work.
Correct, you have to have Lifetime (now called all-in) service. When I got my XL4 several years back, I paid $400 for the DVR and $500 for the Lifetime sub, and I haven't paid anything since, except to buy my Minis to add to it. The cost of Lifetime keeps changing, it was astronomical recently, but it came back down a bit again.

You're not thinking it through to it's conclusion, unless you only have one TV. With Comcast, you pay $10/mo for every single TV you add. With TiVo, it's $150 once and you're done. And with TiVo, some markets avoid the HD fee on Comcast, and in any market, you get paid $2.50/mo for using your own equipment if the TiVo is the only video device on the account.

On top of that, your Minis can now run over Ethernet or MoCA, not just MoCA like Comcast's boxes, and TiVo can unofficially run over PowerLine or Wireless as well if you can get the setup working yourself. I have two Minis running over PowerLine adapters.

The only reason NOT to have TiVo is DirecTV. The only thing that would wrestle my CableCard and TiVo out of my cold, dead hands would be a SWiMLine 3 with SWiM-13 multiswitch mounted with the full tripod and lag screws to structure connected to an HR54 feeding a 4k Genie Mini.
wolfanoodle likes this.
BiggAW is online now  
Old 04-12-2016, 04:06 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Mark12547's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Salem, Oregon, United States, Earth
Posts: 1,748
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 608 Post(s)
Liked: 417
MPEG-4 and DVR storage

From indirect indications, my area (Salem, Oregon) has finished MPEG-4 conversion, or at least the majority of the way there.

In roughly ballpark numbers, this is what I normally see as the amount of disk space freed up from the DVR when I delete various titles:

DiskHoursSD/HDCompressionComments
1%1 hourHDMPEG-2Local HD channels
1%3 hoursHDMPEG-4Non-local HD channels
1%4 hoursSDMPEG-2All SD channels (local & non-local)
Again, these are just ballpark numbers on the Motorola DCX3501 that I rent from Comcast (the Xfinity faceplate labels this as a RNG200N, but there may be other equipment also in the RNG200N category).

These numbers aren't precise (supposedly the DVR has capacity for 60 HD hours, but in practice has been closer to 80 MPEG-2 HD hours, probably due to more compression used since first spec'ed out), and there is bound to be variation based on content (e.g, B&W Academy Ratio content on TCM HD may compress better than detailed HD 1.78:1 non-stop action content), and the error bars on seeing 1% freed up vs. 2% are pretty big.

The above numbers do seem somewhat consistent with taking 3 or is it now 4 HD MPEG-2 channels in a QAM and now using 10 MPEG-4 channels on a QAM: using fewer bits to transmit a program means using fewer bits on the disk when the program is being recorded.

Additional observations:
  1. In terms of raw numbers of HD hours recorded, right now I have more hours waiting for me to view in just about half the disk capacity, whereas a year ago I wouldn't be able to have that many hours of HD content even if I filled the entire disk.
  2. If left on a non-local HD channel (presumably MPEG-4) for a long time, an hour could be buffered, whereas a year ago or even now on a local HD channel (MPEG-2), only about 25 minutes are buffered.
  3. Picture quality seems to be at least as good as before the change to MPEG-4. In fact, last night there were a couple of scenes I watched and then rewatched because I was expecting macroblocking, but I didn't see any. And detail seems to be at least as sharp as before. (I am watching Comcast on a 32-in HDTV from 6 feet away, or a viewing-distance / diagonal-screen-size ratio of about 2.25; someone with a larger screen or sitting closer, or more specifically with a smaller viewing-distance / diagonal-screen-size ratio may notice something different.
  4. Sometimes after FF past commercials and working my way back to the start after the commercial break, on the HD MPEG-4 channels it may take multiple presses of the 20-sec jump back button, apparently not always jumping back the expected amount. (I suspect the DVR code will have to be tweaked a bit to handle that level of repositioning with MPEG-4 streams.)

What I think would be nice would be for Comcast to take the secondary feeds of the HD networks (like Encore) and move them from SD to HD so we would have both the HD resolution and the 16:9 aspect ratio in which to show their features. If my ballpark observations are anywhere close to reality, sending a HD MPEG-4 channel through the cable takes just a little bit more than an SD MPEG-2 channel, not the 4-fold (or a bit more) increase of going from SD MPEG-2 to HD MPEG-2.
PaulGo and NoReDist like this.

My very humble setup:
Spoiler!
Mark12547 is offline  
Old 04-14-2016, 07:50 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
PaulGo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: North Potomac, MD
Posts: 3,908
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 106 Post(s)
Liked: 43
From what I have read Comcast is going to MPEG-4 to get more space for internet services. With the higher internet speeds that customers want any additional space gained from switching to MPEG-4 will be allocated to internet usage. Until Comcast upgrades their equipment of switches to fiber to the premises I doubt Comcast will allocate more space to linear channels. The other use for the additional bandwidth will probably be 4K VOD which Comcast will be forced to offer to be competitive. Another method to gain space may involve Comcast switching all channels for linear to IP based such as they are now doing for computers and portable devices.
Keenan likes this.
PaulGo is online now  
Old 04-14-2016, 01:54 PM
AVS Special Member
 
BiggAW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 1,615
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 366 Post(s)
Liked: 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulGo View Post
From what I have read Comcast is going to MPEG-4 to get more space for internet services. With the higher internet speeds that customers want any additional space gained from switching to MPEG-4 will be allocated to internet usage. Until Comcast upgrades their equipment of switches to fiber to the premises I doubt Comcast will allocate more space to linear channels. The other use for the additional bandwidth will probably be 4K VOD which Comcast will be forced to offer to be competitive. Another method to gain space may involve Comcast switching all channels for linear to IP based such as they are now doing for computers and portable devices.
Yes and no. Most of the capacity that is freed up will go to DOCSIS 3.1, and yes they are eventually going to go to IP. They completely skipped over SDV, unlike most of the other providers who use it. As ridiculously annoying as the TAs are that allow TiVos to talk to the SDV servers, SDV is the only way to offer 200 HD channels and 300mbps internet like TWC does. Comcast is looking towards IP in order to deliver video without having to have always-on linear channels. You might see a couple more analog channels, but in general, no, they won't go beyond the 120 or so HDs that the 860mhz systems have. Unfortunately, there are also a lot of systems out there that are 650mhz or even a bit less, and those have around 70HDs, so the situation is even worse.

FTTH has nothing to do with it. Comcast is an HFC provider and will be for the forseeable future. They will be splitting nodes down until they are N+0, migrating video over to all-IP, hopefully eventually rebuilding everything to 860mhz, and eventually going to DOCSIS 3.1, which will effectively give them about 10gbps of shared bandwidth among a relatively small number of subs on small nodes. With all IPTV, the bandwidth is effectively dynamically re-allocated between internet, VOD, 4k, HD, whatever wants it.

Unfortunately, Comcast doesn't want to have to actually compete in the video space, so instead they are using what is, in many places an ironclad monopoly on internet in order to bully and coerce their customers into buying their otherwise sub-par TV product instead of getting DirecTV or something else or an antenna or nothing at all. What they are doing is blatantly illegal, but the government has yet to enforce the anti-trust laws against them for their actions. In the meantime, they will continue to charge absolutely absurd prices for internet-only service, so basically they get to milk the cow whether people get TV or not.

What is even weirder about their strategy is that they are mostly focused on internet, where they have a monopoly, and not on TV, where there is a healthy competitive market, save for their illegal anti-competitive tactics. In areas that have fiber, VDSL, or overbuilders, it must be a lot tougher for them, as those anti-competitive tactics would no longer work.
PaulGo likes this.
BiggAW is online now  
Old 04-16-2016, 02:55 PM
AVS Special Member
 
holl_ands's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 4,624
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 333 Post(s)
Liked: 151
Don't overlook an even MORE important factor....most SOURCES (esp. C-Band Sat that feed COMCAST nodes) have ALREADY gone to mostly MPEG4 so that THEY can provide a lot more HD programs to the various CATV systems. Distributing that MPEG4 signal ELIMINATES an MPEG4-to-MPEG2 Converter on each and every affected Channel....that's a HUGE savings in hardware...
slapshot and NoReDist like this.
holl_ands is offline  
Old 04-16-2016, 04:11 PM
AVS Special Member
 
BiggAW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 1,615
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 366 Post(s)
Liked: 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by holl_ands View Post
Don't overlook an even MORE important factor....most SOURCES (esp. C-Band Sat that feed COMCAST nodes) have ALREADY gone to mostly MPEG4 so that THEY can provide a lot more HD programs to the various CATV systems. Distributing that MPEG4 signal ELIMINATES an MPEG4-to-MPEG2 Converter on each and every affected Channel....that's a HUGE savings in hardware...
That's irrelevant nonsense. They already have the encoders to do the transcoding to MPEG-2, re-encoding to the insane 10:1 muxes they are getting with MPEG-4 is significantly more expensive than leaving the existing 3:1 and 4:1 MPEG-2 encoders in place. At that point that you're re-encoding that much, it doesn't really matter if the codecs match or not coming in and out, as the quality losses are significant either way, and the processing horsepower required is significant either way. And even if you discount the fact that they already have the 3:1 and 4:1 MPEG-2 encoders, I'd wager a bet that the MPEG-4 encoders that they are using now are significantly more expensive than the MPEG-2 encoders, even accounting for the fact the the new encoders are technically just re-encoding, not transcoding.
BiggAW is online now  
Old 04-17-2016, 05:04 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Mark12547's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Salem, Oregon, United States, Earth
Posts: 1,748
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 608 Post(s)
Liked: 417
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulGo View Post
From what I have read Comcast is going to MPEG-4 to get more space for internet services. With the higher internet speeds that customers want any additional space gained from switching to MPEG-4 will be allocated to internet usage.
This is the speculation I had also read. Informed speculation, but still speculation, and it makes perfect sense since Comcast is introducing 2-gigabit symmetrical Internet service in a few pilot locations and the bandwidth needed for this has to come from somewhere, and it is cheaper to squeeze down the bandwidth used by television by migrating non-local HD to MPEG-4 than it is to do an upgrade of the distribution system (I am referring to the infrastructure between the headend and the user's home) to handle a wider range of frequencies.

Nevertheless, that doesn't stop me from wishing that Comcast would cut over the secondary premium channels from SD to HD. And, yes, I know that not all wishes come true. But http://www.xfinity.com/hdenhanced does include the statement:
Quote:
With our HD Enhanced Program, we're improving the way we deliver HD channels and paving the way for more HD options, faster Internet speeds and Cloud TV.
But the part that says "more HD options" does give a bit of hope, even though that phrase really doesn't tell us much.

My very humble setup:
Spoiler!
Mark12547 is offline  
Old 04-17-2016, 06:33 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
PaulGo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: North Potomac, MD
Posts: 3,908
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 106 Post(s)
Liked: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark12547 View Post
This is the speculation I had also read. Informed speculation, but still speculation, and it makes perfect sense since Comcast is introducing 2-gigabit symmetrical Internet service in a few pilot locations and the bandwidth needed for this has to come from somewhere, and it is cheaper to squeeze down the bandwidth used by television by migrating non-local HD to MPEG-4 than it is to do an upgrade of the distribution system (I am referring to the infrastructure between the headend and the user's home) to handle a wider range of frequencies.
The two gigabit symmetrical Internet is currently only available with fiber to the premises. Symmetrical via DOCSIS is not yet possible and would require an enhancement of the DOCSIS 3.1 standard.

http://www.cablelabs.com/full-duplex...gabit-service/
PaulGo is online now  
Old 04-18-2016, 03:23 PM
AVS Special Member
 
BiggAW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 1,615
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 366 Post(s)
Liked: 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark12547 View Post
This is the speculation I had also read. Informed speculation, but still speculation, and it makes perfect sense since Comcast is introducing 2-gigabit symmetrical Internet service in a few pilot locations and the bandwidth needed for this has to come from somewhere, and it is cheaper to squeeze down the bandwidth used by television by migrating non-local HD to MPEG-4 than it is to do an upgrade of the distribution system (I am referring to the infrastructure between the headend and the user's home) to handle a wider range of frequencies.

Nevertheless, that doesn't stop me from wishing that Comcast would cut over the secondary premium channels from SD to HD. And, yes, I know that not all wishes come true. But http://www.xfinity.com/hdenhanced does include the statement:
But the part that says "more HD options" does give a bit of hope, even though that phrase really doesn't tell us much.
PaulGo already corrected you on the fact that the 2 gigabit internet is Metro-E based.

However, a lot of the systems already are built out to 860mhz, and they still don't have enough bandwidth for gigabit over DOCSIS 3.1, so just rebuilding plants, while it is something that they need to finish doing, isn't going to get them where they need to be. Unfortunately, they have refused to use SDV to deliver more HD with less bandwidth, so they have to compress the living crap out of their HD channels in order to get bandwidth from somewhere, and they still have fewer HDs than IPTV or satellite providers. They're probably going to throw a small handful of new HDs in there just to show that they upgraded something for TV customers, but the reality is that most of the bandwidth savings is going to internet.

If they currently have 110 non-local HDs on 860mhz systems, they are currently (rough numbers) using around 35 QAMs for those, now they will only need about 13 QAMs, meaning that they will be freeing up around 22 QAMs or 132mhz, or enough for over a gigabit of DOCSIS 3.1 bandwidth.
BiggAW is online now  
Old 04-20-2016, 12:36 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
PaulGo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: North Potomac, MD
Posts: 3,908
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 106 Post(s)
Liked: 43
Comcast Introduces Plan To Let TV Subs Watch Without Its Set Top Box


by David Lieberman April 20, 2016 12:12pm






Comcast is relaxing its grip on the set top box, just as it and other cable operators line up to oppose an FCC effort to help manufacturers produce competitive boxes.



The No. 1 cable company unveiled today its Xfinity TV Partner Program that will enable Comcast’s TV customers to access their programming without a company-supplied box. It also announced deals to kick off the program sometime this year for people who own Samsung Smart TV sets and Roku boxes.

This is the first time Comcast has offered nearly all of its TV programming services to home users without a Comcast box. Unlike the streaming TV Everywhere service, today’s announcement involves programming transmitted via the cable line as opposed to the internet.


Users will be able to access two way services — including Comcast’s program guide, video on demand, and cloud-based DVR — as well as federally mandated services such as closed captioning and parental controls.


“We remain committed to giving our customers more choice in how, when and where they access their subscription, and the Xfinity TV Partner Program enables us to efficiently and effectively expand the range of devices our customers can utilize to do that,” says Comcast Cable SVP Mark Hess.


There are still a few details that need to be ironed out. Those who receive programming without Comcast’s box won’t be able to make transactions — for example to watch pay-per-view programming, or buy downloads of movies. It also won’t work with the voice commands available on Comcast’s remote controls.


Those who buy TV from Comcast, but internet from someone else, will need a small device from the cable company to feed the programming into a box like Roku’s that doesn’t use HTML5. Comcast says it doesn’t contemplate a charge for the device.


The cable company didn’t frame the announcement as a counterpoint to the FCC’s set top box initiative — but the industry’s lobby group, the National Cable & Telecommunications Association, did.


The developments “demonstrate how innovative marketplace solutions are enabling consumers to enjoy their favorite pay TV programming on a growing variety of retail devices without the need for a traditional set-top box,” NCTA CEO Michael Powell says. “Instead of rushing forward with a regulatory proceeding that will upset a marketplace that is undergoing such a dramatic transformation and achieving the goals that it seeks, the FCC should study these developments and reconsider the path it appears to be on. ”


Last week President Obama endorsed the FCC effort to open the way for independent manufacturers to offer rival devices that unscramble pay TV transmissions. The White House says that consumers pay about $20 billion a year to rent or lease cable boxes. That’s up 185% over the last 20 years, a time when prices for computers, televisions and mobile phones have declined by 90%.


“It’s been tied to the provider, and you rent it and consumers spend billions of dollars on this every single year,” Obama told Yahoo Finance. “There hasn’t been much innovation.”

http://deadline.com/2016/04/comcast-...ox-1201740942/
PaulGo is online now  
Old 04-20-2016, 12:48 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
PaulGo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: North Potomac, MD
Posts: 3,908
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 106 Post(s)
Liked: 43
The Xfinity TV Partner Program Frequently Asked Questions

What is the Xfinity TV Partner Program?

The Xfinity TV Partner Program is a program launched by Comcast that is available to manufacturers of consumer electronics devices, including smart TVs and other IP-enabled devices that display content on TV screens. Partners will be able to integrate the new Xfinity TV Partner app onto their devices that will allow consumers to access Xfinity TV cable service. These partners must agree to the Xfinity TV Partner Program license agreement, and devices must meet program technical requirements such as content security requirements and applicable regulatory obligations.

What is the Xfinity TV Partner app?

The Xfinity TV Partner app will enable TV and other CE manufacturers to allow consumers to watch Xfinity TV cable service on their devices without the need for a leased set-top box. The Xfinity TV Partner app provides Comcast video customers with access to their cable service, including live and on demand programming (local broadcast, cable, and Public, Educational and Governmental (PEG) channels), as well as cloud DVR recordings. Customers will discover and navigate content via Xfinity TV’s award winning user interface.

What does the Xfinity TV Partner Program cost to join?

Comcast does not charge program partners to register or participate in the program. Partners bear their own expenses for any development, marketing, and operations associated with integration of the Xfinity TV Partner app on their device.

What are the technical requirements necessary for a company to participate in the Xfinity TV Partner Program and host the Xfinity TV Partner app?

The technical requirements for the company’s participating devices include, but are not limited to, compliance with:
  • World Wide Web Consortium HTML5 Open Web Platform standards
  • Media Source Extensions (MSE)
  • Encrypted Media Extensions (EME) with:
    • Adobe Access CDM (Content Decryption Module) and/or
    • Microsoft PlayReady CDM
  • Web Cryptography API
Participating devices must also enable the Xfinity TV Partner app to comply with all applicable regulatory requirements for cable service (e.g., Emergency Alert System (EAS), and Closed Captioning) and support requirements set out in Comcast’s agreements with programmers (e.g., copy restrictions, geographic restrictions, branding of content). Full requirements are specified in the Xfinity TV Partner App License Agreement and related technical documentation.
What other options are currently available to Xfinity TV customers to access their cable subscription on retail devices?

In addition to the Xfinity TV Partner app, Comcast continues to support multiple ways for customers to access their Xfinity cable service on a variety of third-party devices:
  • Xfinity TV apps for iOS and Android mobile phones and tablets
  • On the web, customers can watch content via http://xtv.comcast.net on PCs and laptops with supported browsers, including Internet Explorer, Chrome, and Safari
  • Retail CableCARD-enabled devices allow customers to lease a CableCARD from Comcast for installation in compatible devices
  • VidiPath-compatible Smart TVs or other connected devices. For more information, visit the Comcast subscriber VidiPath support page at www.xfinity.com/vidipath

https://developer.xfinity.com/cableapp/moreinfo
PaulGo is online now  
Old 04-27-2016, 08:19 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
PaulGo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: North Potomac, MD
Posts: 3,908
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 106 Post(s)
Liked: 43
Comcast Ups Data-Usage Caps to 1 Terabyte, And Netflix’s CEO Applauds

Comcast announced that it will soon more than triple the data limit for broadband customers on its usage-based pricing plans, to 1 terabyte per month — a move that drew a thumbs-up from Netflix CEO Reed Hastings, who has tangled with the cable giant on bandwidth issues in the past.


“Huge for me as a Comcast customer,” Hastings tweeted about the news. “Now I’ll never be able to watch enough to hit my cap.”


With the 1-terabyte ceiling, Comcast customers will now be able to stream about 700 hours of HD video each month, according to the cable company. The change will take effect June 1 for all subscribers on usage-based plans, regardless of their speed tier; previously those users were capped at 300 gigabytes per month.


Of course, the Comcast caps don’t appear to currently apply to Hastings, who lives in the San Francisco Bay Area. The cable giant has rolled out the usage-based pricing model in about two dozen markets including Atlanta, Miami, Tucson, Little Rock, Ark., Nashville, Tenn., Charleston, S.C., and Maine. Comcast says it’s evaluating expanding the plans to other areas, but for now subscribers who aren’t in those markets do not have a usage cap.

Still, Hastings’ comments on the Comcast shift are markedly different from the hostile tone Netflix took two years ago, when the streamer was fighting with Comcast over payments to guarantee network bandwidth for its video. “It is extortion when Comcast fails to provide its own customers the broadband speed they’ve paid for unless Netflix also pays a ransom,” Netflix said in September 2014.
Meanwhile, Netflix recently was embroiled in its own bandwidth-throttling brouhaha. Last month, it disclosed that has for years limited video delivered over wireless networks at 600 kilobits per second, with informing customers. Netflix says it will launch a new feature in May to let customers control how much mobile bandwidth they want to use to stream video.


The FCC remains concerned that broadband providers could thwart Internet video services by imposing data caps and usage-based pricing, although those are allowed under the agency’s so-called net neutrality regulations. In approving Charter Communications’ takeover of Time Warner Cable and Bright House Networks, the FCC among other conditions will prohibit the companies from charging broadband subs based on usage for seven years. (Charter already had pledged to not adopt caps or usage-based pricing.)


According to Comcast, more than 99% of its broadband users don’t come close to using a terabyte each month, with the typical customer consuming only about 60 gigabytes (or 6% of 1 terabyte). “We have created a new data plan that is so high that most of our customers will never have to think about how much data they use,” Comcast exec VP of consumer services Marcien Jenckes said in announcing the new policy.


For extremely heavy users who want more than a terabyte, Comcast will offer the option to sign up for an unlimited plan for an additional $50 a month, or choose to purchase additional data in increments of 50 gigabytes for $10 each.


Prior May 2012, Comcast had placed a 250-gigabyte monthly usage cap on all broadband users. It eliminated that restriction with the launch of the usage-based pricing trials.


http://variety.com/2016/digital/news...eo-1201762361/
PaulGo is online now  
Old 05-03-2016, 04:19 AM
AVS Special Member
 
dr1394's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Mizar 5
Posts: 3,338
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 83 Post(s)
Liked: 47
HBO moving to HEVC uplinks.

http://ir.arris.com/phoenix.zhtml?c=...cle&ID=2158195

Ron
Keenan likes this.

HD MPEG-2 Test Patterns http://www.w6rz.net
dr1394 is offline  
Old 05-04-2016, 03:13 PM
AVS Special Member
 
BiggAW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 1,615
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 366 Post(s)
Liked: 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by dr1394 View Post
So.... 4k HBO coming soon? That's pretty awesome actually.
BiggAW is online now  
Old 05-04-2016, 05:04 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
PaulGo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: North Potomac, MD
Posts: 3,908
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 106 Post(s)
Liked: 43
The question is will Comcast allocate the bandwidth for a 4K channel? I think that initially Comcast will probably have 4K VOD content, similar to how they show 3D HBO content.
PaulGo is online now  
Old 05-06-2016, 09:28 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
scowl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 10,650
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 122 Post(s)
Liked: 38
Here in Portland the new MPEG4 channels take up about one third the bandwidth of the MPEG2 channels. I don't expect them to triple the number of HD channels so some bandwidth will free up once the conversion is completed.

NOW: my post on AVS Forum.
NEXT: someone else's post on AVS Forum.
scowl is offline  
Old 05-06-2016, 10:50 AM
AVS Special Member
 
sgbroimp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: CT Shore
Posts: 1,051
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 232 Post(s)
Liked: 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by scowl View Post
Here in Portland the new MPEG4 channels take up about one third the bandwidth of the MPEG2 channels. I don't expect them to triple the number of HD channels so some bandwidth will free up once the conversion is completed.
In my town they run a 475 (or so) cable system, many channels are size-shrunk, 30 HD channels less than one town over and bit rates for the networks of under 12. Just awful. Would be nice if they would clean up the basics of fundamental cable TV transmission before they increase the whiz bang stuff. Comcast Technology Topic???? Is that an oxymoron like military intelligence and jumbo shrimp?
sgbroimp is offline  
Old 05-07-2016, 09:55 PM
AVS Special Member
 
BiggAW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 1,615
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 366 Post(s)
Liked: 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulGo View Post
The question is will Comcast allocate the bandwidth for a 4K channel? I think that initially Comcast will probably have 4K VOD content, similar to how they show 3D HBO content.
My sense is that they will DOCSIS 3.1 IP-based, so they don't really take up any bandwidth, since they are just QoS'ed out of the pool of internet bandwidth. Then more HDs will be added IP-only, and then eventually linear channels will start disappearing to moving to IP jus like analog did over the period of several years. I'd expect to see either 4k or specialty channels launched via IP on at least some Comcast systems by the end of 2017, and within 10 years, QAM will be completely gone.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sgbroimp View Post
In my town they run a 475 (or so) cable system, many channels are size-shrunk, 30 HD channels less than one town over and bit rates for the networks of under 12. Just awful. Would be nice if they would clean up the basics of fundamental cable TV transmission before they increase the whiz bang stuff. Comcast Technology Topic???? Is that an oxymoron like military intelligence and jumbo shrimp?
There are no 475mhz systems. But yeah, there are a bunch of 650mhz systems, like Clinton (where I believe you are based on our previous discussions?) and Groton, and we're just screwed. Groton is roughly 50 HDs short of Branford, which was rebuilt to 860mhz in 2011. It's pathetic. However, the compression issues are universal, since they compress for all systems, so the main 70 HD's that all systems have are heavily compressed, whereas some of the 750/860mhz-only channels like ESPNU are absolutely stunning, as they don't seem to care about squishing them down. Also, according to a Comcast CSR I talked to, FWIW, the 650mhz systems only have 8 D3 channels, but the 750/860mhz systems have 16 D3 channels.

Yeah, it's pathetic that they haven't universally rebuilt their plants to 860mhz. The problem is, most people are so asleep at the wheel that they don't realize that they are getting less than HALF the number of HD channels that they could get on DirecTV, or they just don't care. Most people don't care about quality, and only watch a few popular channels, and this is the result.
BiggAW is online now  
Old 05-17-2016, 10:58 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
PaulGo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: North Potomac, MD
Posts: 3,908
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 106 Post(s)
Liked: 43
Comcast Plans HDR Screenings for Rio Games

BOSTON -- INTX -- Comcast has big plans for the Olympics. On top of extended coverage from its NBCUniversal division and new features for sports fans bundled into its X1 TV platform, the cable operator has announced that it will stream live HDR video from the Rio Games.
That High Dynamic Range content, which is a tandem technology to 4K Ultra HDTV and is designed to make video appear brighter and more vivid, won't be available to the masses, but it will be on display through demonstration screenings at multiple locations.
"We are going to be demonstrating HDR," said CTO Tony Werner at a Comcast Corp. (Nasdaq: CMCSA, CMCSK)'s press conference during the Internet & Television Expo. "We'll have a number of demonstrations of the Olympics live nearing that event in different venues."


Comcast HDR set-top at INTX 2016
The news followed further confirmation that Comcast also plans to roll out an HDR set-top later this year, which Werner touted as the first in the world from a service provider. That set-top is in tech trials now with about 150 of the devices deployed among Comcast employees and friends.

It will still take some time for live HDR content and HDR-capable hardware to trickle into the mainstream, but the TV industry sees the technology as critical for driving the next wave of television upgrades. Even more than 4K/UHD TV on its own, the industry believes HDR will prove a draw for consumers by offering a significant improvement in picture quality. In addition to the HDR set-top, Comcast also took the opportunity at INTX to highlight its next-generation voice-controlled Xfinity remote. The new remote's most notable feature is a backlit microphone icon advertising the voice-control feature.


New X1 voice remote and gigabit gateway
And Comcast also showed off the latest iterations of its gigabit gateway and WiFi extender products. Earlier versions of both devices were shown at INTX last year, but Comcast is much closer to launch in 2016 with its DOCSIS 3.1 gigabit service rollout in Atlanta, and planned rollouts for Nashville, Chicago, Detroit and Miami.


http://www.lightreading.com/video/4k...d/d-id/723442?
PaulGo is online now  
Old 05-18-2016, 02:36 PM
AVS Special Member
 
BiggAW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 1,615
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 366 Post(s)
Liked: 88
LOL. Comcast's big improvements are a remote with a light-up voice command button, and some new Wifi crap. They don't want to spend the money to upgrade systems and actually add HD channels or improve picture quality, they just throw stupid gimmicks on instead. Yay Comcast!
BiggAW is online now  
Old 05-18-2016, 03:07 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
PaulGo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: North Potomac, MD
Posts: 3,908
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 106 Post(s)
Liked: 43
INTX 2016: Comcast Sets July 4 Debut for First HDR-Capable Box

Comcast CTO Tony Werner says he has more interest in high dynamic range than 4K 5/18/2016 11:15 AM Eastern Last updated at 5/18/2016 12:54 PM
By: Jeff Baumgartner






Comcast's new HDR-capable Xi5 box (center) is on show this week at INTX
Boston – Comcast plans to start shipping its first box with on-board High Dynamic Range (HDR) capabilities on July 4, according to Tony Werner, Comcast’s EVP and chief technology officer, said here Wednesday during a session with other industry CTOs.

That will ensure that the Xi5 will be available in time for the Rio Olympics, where NBCUniversal will be producing some coverage in the HDR format. Comcast also offer a taste of HDR during the games at some special screenings that will showcase the format.

Werner said he has more personal interest in HDR, a technology that enables brighter and more colorful pixels, than 4K, a format that packs about four times the number of pixels than today’s HDTV images.

He said upconverted 1080p looks good, but HDR makes it “noticeably better.”

Here at the show, Comcast showed off the Xi5, its first HDR-capable box that will be wireless and work with the company’s IP-capable X1 platform. Comcast is also developing the Xi6, which will support both HDR and 4K.

Comcast plans to demo HDR in some hosted events it will arrange during the summer games in Rio.

As for 4K, Werner said Comcast won’t “roadblock” access to it, but said there’s need for more content in that format .

The wide-ranging discussion also touched on Comcast’s X1 platform, which is being licensed by Cox Communications and Shaw Communications and uses the Reference Design Kit (RDK), a preintegrated software platform for video and broadband devices being managed by Comcast, Liberty Global and Time Warner Cable (now part of Charter Communications).

Licensing X1 for Cox’s new “Contour” product, “was a key part of our strategy to gain scale, scale around innovation,” Kevin Hart, Cox’s EVP and CTO, said, stressing that there’s a need for more collaboration in the industry.

“The early success is off the charts,” Hart said of Cox’s new X1-based Contour product, which has been deployed to most of the MSO's markets. He added that Cox is looking to update its capital models next year in order to keep up with demand this year and into 2017.

“Once we got this locked and loaded, these guy went,” Werner said.

The panel also discussed the evolving world of advertising and the shift to more targeted and interactive ads.

Comcast, Werner said, expanded on Comcast’s strategy to integrate interactive ads with the X1 guide environment.

Though advertisers weren’t interested in the early phases of X1 when few customers were on the service, that’s no longer true as Comcast aims to get 50% of its video base on it by the end of the year. “They are doing the limbo under our door to get ad spots on there,” Werner said, noting earlier that he has “warmed up” to the idea of offering interactive ads on the X1 guide.

Comcast has supported interactive ads on legacy boxes using EBIF (Enhanced TV Binary Interchange Format) (EBIF), but plans to bring it back in a “big way” to X1 using more advanced technology.

Roku, meanwhile, is also pushing hard into this arena, and recently struck a deal with Viacom to help the programmer make its ads more relevant, said Steve Shannon, GM of content and services at Roku.

Darcy Antonellis, CEO of Vubiquity, noted that targeted advertising technologies continue to improve, but are still in the “nascent stages” when it comes to refinement, noting that her getting an for Deadpool is a “tell-tale sign” of that because she’s not in the demographic for that particular movie.

The talk also touched on the potential for virtual reality and 360 video.

Discovery Communications, which launched a VR unit last year, is “still searching for that consistent user experience,” company CTO John Honeycutt said.

And though mobile video is grabbing lots of attention and headlines, there’s a “revenge of the TV” occurring as more of those big screens get connected to the Internet, Roku’s Shannon said. “It is roaring back to be the predominant streaming platform.”

Werner said Comcast is finding tablets and other second screens to be accretive, and not a displacement of TV viewing. “They can fill gaps with it,” he said, noting that Comcast, for example, has seen many viewers pause a show on the set-top at 10:15 p.m. and then soon resume it on a tablet.



http://www.multichannel.com/news/cab...ble-box/405030








PaulGo is online now  
Old 05-19-2016, 11:32 AM
AVS Special Member
 
sgbroimp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: CT Shore
Posts: 1,051
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 232 Post(s)
Liked: 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by BiggAW View Post
LOL. Comcast's big improvements are a remote with a light-up voice command button, and some new Wifi crap. They don't want to spend the money to upgrade systems and actually add HD channels or improve picture quality, they just throw stupid gimmicks on instead. Yay Comcast!
They seem to have plenty to spend on all the junk mail they send us all too. You know, the little plastic discount card in the letter about taking on their security system....yeah right, LOL.
sgbroimp is offline  
Old 05-19-2016, 10:10 PM
AVS Special Member
 
BiggAW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 1,615
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 366 Post(s)
Liked: 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by sgbroimp View Post
They seem to have plenty to spend on all the junk mail they send us all too. You know, the little plastic discount card in the letter about taking on their security system....yeah right, LOL.
Yeah. The money should be going into plant rebuilds not that crap.
BiggAW is online now  
Old 05-20-2016, 10:36 AM
AVS Special Member
 
sgbroimp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: CT Shore
Posts: 1,051
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 232 Post(s)
Liked: 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by BiggAW View Post
Yeah. The money should be going into plant rebuilds not that crap.
Amen!!!!!!!!!!!
sgbroimp is offline  
Old 05-24-2016, 12:35 PM
Member
 
jtscribe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 115
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 51 Post(s)
Liked: 13
For those of you who live in areas where Comcast has transitioned to MPEG.4, how long as it taken since you got the letter?

I haven't gotten the letter, but I assume it's coming at some point - and will require an HTPC rebuild to get off of my Intel integrated graphics, unfortunately. Just trying to plan ahead.
jtscribe is offline  
Old 05-24-2016, 12:55 PM
AVS Special Member
 
sgbroimp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: CT Shore
Posts: 1,051
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 232 Post(s)
Liked: 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtscribe View Post
For those of you who live in areas where Comcast has transitioned to MPEG.4, how long as it taken since you got the letter?

I haven't gotten the letter, but I assume it's coming at some point - and will require an HTPC rebuild to get off of my Intel integrated graphics, unfortunately. Just trying to plan ahead.
I know what MPEG4 is but can you provide some background about "the letter" as you call it and what the compatibility issues are with existing HTPC's? I have one using the Intel intergrated graphics you describe and Ceton PcIE6 tuner.
sgbroimp is offline  
Old 05-24-2016, 01:46 PM
Member
 
jtscribe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 115
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 51 Post(s)
Liked: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by sgbroimp View Post
I know what MPEG4 is but can you provide some background about "the letter" as you call it and what the compatibility issues are with existing HTPC's? I have one using the Intel intergrated graphics you describe and Ceton PcIE6 tuner.
Supposedly Comcast sends a letter to notify you of the changeover to MPEG4, to give you an opportunity to replace STBs if you need any new equipment.

There's a known issue with Intel integrated graphics (as well as XBox and Ceton extenders) playing back the MPEG4 content. I think there's a thread here somewhere, but here's the ongoing one at TGB.

http://www.thegreenbutton.tv/forums/...php?f=5&t=9635

I'm using a mini-ITX Intel board with a PCIE6 also, so I need a new case, motherboard, and graphics card if/when my area changes over. Thankfully don't use extenders, because there's no workaround for that.
jtscribe is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
 
Thread Tools


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off