OVER-THE-AIR DIGITAL TELEVISION RECEPTION FAQ: New to OTA? Start here! - Page 7 - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #181 of 248 Old 01-25-2009, 06:37 AM - Thread Starter
Super Moderator
 
DrDon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Metro Detroit
Posts: 12,535
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 39 Post(s)
Liked: 222
Quote:
Originally Posted by housedog View Post

hi
Got myself a new digital tv converter box for my tv .problem i am having is i set it up and i only get one tv station but if i turn the converter box off i get all kinds of channel like 23,26,29,17 and so on .is there something i am doing wrong.
thank you for the help.

Are you talking about one of the converter boxes being used with a standard television?

Walking the fine line between jaw-dropping and a plain ol' yawn.
DrDon is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #182 of 248 Old 01-25-2009, 09:54 AM
Newbie
 
Fiveways's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Ames, IA 50014
Posts: 4
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDon View Post

Welcome to AVS. Yes, you'll need a tuner and an antenna or a tuner and cable service. You'll find a list of set-top-boxes in the (It won't even let me quote the URL you had because I don't have 3 posts yet ) near this thread.

As for the type of antenna you need, follow the directions in this thread and the AVS Antenna Topic. Check your local thread for help with specifics.

Once you have an ATSC tuner, about all you need to worry about post-transition is rescanning. In many cities, TV stations will flip the digital signal they're now broadcasting on another frequency back to their legacy channel or possibly even a third frequency. See the channel election thread at the top of the Local Reception forum for THOSE details.

And, if you don't mind, edit your personal details to include your rough location. Since so much of this is location specific, it helps us help you if we don't have to ask where you live.

Good luck.

Thanks for the response. I checked the broadcast locations in my area and all of them are 15 miles or closer to where I am and behind my house off to the southeast. Luckily, in a town like this there arent really any tall structures or anything.

So if I read your response correctly, I could just get a tuner and use that in conjunction with the cable service I currently have and that'll give me my HD local channels? I guess the reason I'm confused is because of all this "digital" stuff that I have to hear everytime I turn on my tv I'd rather be looking at things in HD.
Fiveways is offline  
post #183 of 248 Old 01-25-2009, 10:03 AM - Thread Starter
Super Moderator
 
DrDon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Metro Detroit
Posts: 12,535
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 39 Post(s)
Liked: 222
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fiveways View Post

So if I read your response correctly, I could just get a tuner and use that in conjunction with the cable service I currently have and that'll give me my HD local channels? I guess the reason I'm confused is because of all this "digital" stuff that I have to hear everytime I turn on my tv I'd rather be looking at things in HD.

If your cable service offers HD - and most do, I believe - call them and upgrade to the package that gets you what you want. The cable company's set top box or DVR generally costs a few bucks a month and will work with your television. Same with the satellite services.

There are tuners you can buy that'll do either ATSC (over the air) and/or what we call "clear QAM." The latter refers to the unscrambled HD stations your cable company may provide. And that's usually limited to the local broadcast affiliates and possibly a few other channels.

If you don't have or don't plan to keep your cable TV service, then you'd connect an antenna to an ATSC tuner and start scanning. Start cheap and keep receipts. Sometimes at your distance, rabbit ears will do. Other times, you may need a rooftop. Everybody's situation is different.

It all depends on the time and effort (and $$) you want to put into this.

Walking the fine line between jaw-dropping and a plain ol' yawn.
DrDon is online now  
post #184 of 248 Old 01-25-2009, 02:24 PM
Newbie
 
Fiveways's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Ames, IA 50014
Posts: 4
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDon View Post

If your cable service offers HD - and most do, I believe - call them and upgrade to the package that gets you what you want. The cable company's set top box or DVR generally costs a few bucks a month and will work with your television. Same with the satellite services.

There are tuners you can buy that'll do either ATSC (over the air) and/or what we call "clear QAM." The latter refers to the unscrambled HD stations your cable company may provide. And that's usually limited to the local broadcast affiliates and possibly a few other channels.

If you don't have or don't plan to keep your cable TV service, then you'd connect an antenna to an ATSC tuner and start scanning. Start cheap and keep receipts. Sometimes at your distance, rabbit ears will do. Other times, you may need a rooftop. Everybody's situation is different.

It all depends on the time and effort (and $$) you want to put into this.

Thanks. At this point I'm just looking to get my local channels in HD. I called Mediacom and they were trying to sell me a STB. I'm guessing thats for their base package that has the espn, tnt, tbs, etc in HD, which is fine. Its not very expensive monthly but they require a credit check first, and since I have crap credit they want me to pay $100 up front which I have no desire to do since I'm already paying $100 a month after basic cable + internet. However, if I were to get my local channels in HD for the time being and I was pleased with the quality, then I'd consider looking into it more. I just want to make sure its worth the money before I invest into it, you know?
Fiveways is offline  
post #185 of 248 Old 02-04-2009, 11:05 AM
Newbie
 
gooeytarballs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Florida
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:


If only two directions are of interest, it is possible to "gang" two antennas in different directions but with a 3 db loss and with the possibility of inteference.

What if you mount them each on a different mast? Say about 4 feet or so apart?

How do you connect them to the converter? What sort of "coupler" should one use?

gooey tarballs AT Gee Mail dot Com for direct reply you can put it together
gooeytarballs is offline  
post #186 of 248 Old 02-04-2009, 11:18 AM - Thread Starter
Super Moderator
 
DrDon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Metro Detroit
Posts: 12,535
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 39 Post(s)
Liked: 222
Quote:
Originally Posted by gooeytarballs View Post

What if you mount them each on a different mast? Say about 4 feet or so apart?

How do you connect them to the converter? What sort of "coupler" should one use?

4 feet won't make much difference if you're getting multipath or other interference. In that case, you'd be better off with an A/B switch rather than combining the antennas.

If you do go with combining, just use an ordinary splitter in reverse. Where you put the combiner (splitter in reverse) will depend on what else you put on the antenna. If you're not putting a preamp on one or both antennas, then it's not all that much of an issue.

Walking the fine line between jaw-dropping and a plain ol' yawn.
DrDon is online now  
post #187 of 248 Old 02-04-2009, 08:52 PM
Senior Member
 
DragonLoaf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 415
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 14
The News Hour (PBS) did a segment tonight about the DTV transition. The expert answering the questions seemed well-informed, but then said that "digital signals are much weaker than analog" signals, and people may have trouble receiving them.

I thought signal strength would be independent of the format being delivered. Isn't the signal just as strong if the tower is sending it with the same amount of energy, or is there something about digital broadcasts that makes them weaker?

Thanks in advance for clearing up my confusion.
DragonLoaf is offline  
post #188 of 248 Old 02-04-2009, 09:23 PM
AVS Club Gold
 
mrvideo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 6,171
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 92 Post(s)
Liked: 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by DragonLoaf View Post

I thought signal strength would be independent of the format being delivered. Isn't the signal just as strong if the tower is sending it with the same amount of energy, or is there something about digital broadcasts that makes them weaker?

You'd think that, but the 8VSB modulation scheme causes the signal to "act" differetly. I'm not an RF engineer, so I can't provide you with any of the details.

But, if you could look at a spectrum analyzer display output of a digital channel and one of an analog channel, you'd see a world of difference. If you looked at the broad spectrum in your area, you'd be able to point out the digital and analog stations without any difficulties.

Technically both are analog, as you are just modulating the analog RF signal differently.

"What do you say Beckett. Wanna have a baby?" - Castle to Det. Beckett
"How Long have I been gone?" Alexis after arriving home and seeing Castle and Beckett w/ the baby - Castle - 11/25/13
Mr. Video
My Geek Images

mrvideo is offline  
post #189 of 248 Old 02-08-2009, 07:23 AM
Senior Member
 
Satcom15's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Colorado Springs CO
Posts: 472
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Just a reminder for anyone who stumbled across this thread (and other interested parties) wondering about HOA restrictions on what the FCC calls Over The Air Reception Devices (OTARDs) - antennas.

HOA's and their CC&Rs can not preclude installation of exterior OTA TV antennas, DTH satellite antennas, and/or MMDS wireless internet antennas (typically those flat diamond shape antennas) per FCC regulation. Note there are some FCC recognized limits to that rule. Also, the HOA can ask for installation mods or screening to minimize visual impacts, but they can not be onerous or expensive to the point where it prevents you from installing the antenna. The rule only applies to antennes with a height of less than 12 feet above the roof ridgeline. Higher than that, and things become more complicated. I'm battling an HOA where I have a rental property on this matter - their covenant on banning outdoor antennas is unenforcible. I sent them model/proposed CC&R text which complies with the FCC rule on exterior antennas, we'll see what they say. If anyone wants details, let me know.

Oh yeah, it might be helpful to include a couple of FCC links. Here they are:

www.fcc.gov/cgb/consumerfacts/consumerdish
www.fcc.gov/mb/facts/otard
Satcom15 is offline  
post #190 of 248 Old 03-02-2009, 08:44 AM
Advanced Member
 
wvasko's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Central IL
Posts: 723
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Got a question and need info.
I am switching from a CM 4228 antenna to a Winegard 7698 antenna. Will this be a noticeable upgrade or am I beating a dead horse. Just trying to keep ahead of the 6/12 changeover. I also like the USA built Winegard product. I am 60 miles from south channels and 90 miles from Chicago channels and have managed to pull either direction having to bow to the reception gods on a regular basis from the north. 57 ft tower, Yaesu 800 rotor and Winegard amp. original stuff installed 8/08 and am doing some tweaking. Any antenna info appreciated.

Please, Dumb It Down For Me.
wvasko is offline  
post #191 of 248 Old 03-02-2009, 09:17 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Digital Rules's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 1,642
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 13
Why not just augment the 4228 with a Winegard YA-1713? You will lose a bit of UHF gain and signal gathering ability with the 7698.
Digital Rules is offline  
post #192 of 248 Old 03-02-2009, 02:47 PM
Member
 
inswing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I have a Samsung plasma with ATSC and other tuners. To watch HD channels, I am planning to get an antenna. AFAIK, antennas come with a coax. Can you watch HD channels over coax? Do the HD channels not look very nice because of the cable? If you are using an antenna, is there any option other than to plug the coax coming out from the antenna into the TV? I realize I can subscribe to a HD package on satellite or cable, but I am just wondering if the quality of the picture is going to be comparable if you are catching the same channel OTA and feeding it to the tv by a coax.
inswing is offline  
post #193 of 248 Old 03-02-2009, 03:33 PM
Senior Member
 
WillieAntenna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Southern, WI
Posts: 395
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by inswing View Post

I have a Samsung plasma with ATSC and other tuners. To watch HD channels, I am planning to get an antenna. AFAIK, antennas come with a coax. Can you watch HD channels over coax? Do the HD channels not look very nice because of the cable? If you are using an antenna, is there any option other than to plug the coax coming out from the antenna into the TV? I realize I can subscribe to a HD package on satellite or cable, but I am just wondering if the quality of the picture is going to be comparable if you are catching the same channel OTA and feeding it to the tv by a coax.

OTA,Satellite and Cable all use Coax Cable to carry their siginals. You will get more channel and much better HD PQ with OTA than Satellite or Cable. Most of all with OTA it FREE!

Willie
WillieAntenna is offline  
post #194 of 248 Old 03-02-2009, 04:22 PM
Member
 
inswing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by WillieAntenna View Post

OTA,Satellite and Cable all use Coax Cable to carry their siginals. You will get more channel and much better HD PQ with OTA than Satellite or Cable. Most of all with OTA it FREE!

Willie

Thanks, that is good to know. This is a probably silly question, but let me ask it anyway. If coax can carry HD signal just fine, why are there all these different connection types - HDMI, DVI, s-vidio, component, and so on? People say that for the best PQ, use HDMI, and HDMI is better than X, and X is better than Y, etc. Is coax as good as any of these?
inswing is offline  
post #195 of 248 Old 03-03-2009, 03:07 AM
Advanced Member
 
wvasko's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Central IL
Posts: 723
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Digital Rules View Post

Why not just augment the 4228 with a Winegard YA-1713? You will lose a bit of UHF gain and signal gathering ability with the 7698.

Well that ship has sailed as I already have the 7698, just not installed yet. Please keep fingers crossed. I'm going to pray to the reception gods and hope I haven't changed what I got, I'm thinking instead of stamps I will just have a good start on a antenna collection. I will get update out when weather breaks a tad and can get up tower safely. Ice and tower climbing don't mix well. I do have an installer and we discussed stuff and he thought the 7698 would be a good move. I purchased antenna from amazon so he didn't have a big vested interest in selling etc.

Please, Dumb It Down For Me.
wvasko is offline  
post #196 of 248 Old 03-03-2009, 05:58 AM
AVS Special Member
 
jtbell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Clinton, SC
Posts: 3,822
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by inswing View Post

Thanks, that is good to know. This is a probably silly question, but let me ask it anyway. If coax can carry HD signal just fine, why are there all these different connection types - HDMI, DVI, s-vidio, component, and so on? People say that for the best PQ, use HDMI, and HDMI is better than X, and X is better than Y, etc. Is coax as good as any of these?

Coax is for the raw signal coming from your antenna or cable provider, which contains all your channels mixed together, on different frequencies in the VHF and UHF bands.

Your TV's tuner or set-top box selects ("tunes") one of those channels and extracts the digital video and audio data from it. If the tuner is built into your TV, obviously no further external connection is necessary. If you're using a set-top box, you need to get the video and audio to your TV somehow.

HDMI is a digital connection. Component-video (red/green/blue) is analog, but with enough capacity to carry a high-definition analog video signal. S-video and composite-video (yellow) have enough capacity for only standard-definition analog. We have all these different types of connections for historical reasons. As video signals from TV etc. became better, people had to come up with better types of connections, and we keep the older types for compatibility with old TVs and video components.
jtbell is offline  
post #197 of 248 Old 03-03-2009, 07:37 AM
Member
 
inswing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtbell View Post

Coax is for the raw signal coming from your antenna or cable provider, which contains all your channels mixed together, on different frequencies in the VHF and UHF bands.

Your TV's tuner or set-top box selects ("tunes") one of those channels and extracts the digital video and audio data from it. If the tuner is built into your TV, obviously no further external connection is necessary. If you're using a set-top box, you need to get the video and audio to your TV somehow.

HDMI is a digital connection. Component-video (red/green/blue) is analog, but with enough capacity to carry a high-definition analog video signal. S-video and composite-video (yellow) have enough capacity for only standard-definition analog. We have all these different types of connections for historical reasons. As video signals from TV etc. became better, people had to come up with better types of connections, and we keep the older types for compatibility with old TVs and video components.

Thanks for the information. I was confused because coax is rated as the worst connection type. But this is only true for a connection between a stb and the tv. It is not true for a connection between an OTA antenna and tv, or between a dish and stb. It is strange that coax can carry multiple hd channels without loss from your dish to your stb, but cannot carry one hd channel from your stb to the tv. But looks like that's the way it is. This thread also clears this up.

http://www.highdefforum.com/cables-c...x-vs-hdmi.html
inswing is offline  
post #198 of 248 Old 03-03-2009, 09:21 AM
AVS Special Member
 
jtbell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Clinton, SC
Posts: 3,822
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by inswing View Post

It is strange that coax can carry multiple hd channels without loss from your dish to your stb, but cannot carry one hd channel from your stb to the tv.

When you use a coax connection for analog signals, as with a VCR or the new DTV converter boxes, the box modulates the video signal onto a VHF carrier signal (channel 3 or 4) so it looks just like an OTA broadcast signal from an antenna. Then the TV has to tune it and demodulate it to extract the video, just like with a signal from an antenna. The extra modulation and demodulation steps degrade the picture.

In principle, we could use a similar setup for digital video, encoding and modulating it onto a VHF or UHF carrier signal so it looks just like a broadcast (ATSC) or cable (QAM) signal, and then your TV could receive it just like a digital broadcast or cable channel, provided that it has a digital TV tuner. The picture wouldn't be degraded by the extra steps, because the data is digital. However, the encoder/modulator (not sure what the proper term is for this) is apparently too expensive to include economically in a standalone digital STB, and all HDTVs have either component-video or HDMI inputs or (usually) both, anyway.
jtbell is offline  
post #199 of 248 Old 03-04-2009, 04:19 PM
Senior Member
 
Lazza's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 226
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I have a Vizio 32" plasma hooked to an indoor antenna. It pretty much gets the stations I want. However it does bring is a few "phantom channels", digital channels, when I do a can. For example it tells me it found channels 27-7 and 27-8. But going to those channels brings up 'no signal' response, unsurprising since these channels don't exist. And it does this consistently. That is, rescanning always brings up the same phantom channels. Any ideas on why this might be happening? Is the tuner in the Vizio too sensitive and some interference has it confused? Or is the tuner faulty? Any thoughts on correcting this behavior?

As a comparison, I use a Samsung DTB-H260F and a tuner from my Panasonic 3576 DVD recorder in another room. Since this room is one floor up I get more "good" (ie, valid) digital stations but with none of the phantoms.


Thanks.


_Larry
Lazza is offline  
post #200 of 248 Old 03-05-2009, 11:15 PM
Senior Member
 
Satcom15's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Colorado Springs CO
Posts: 472
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lazza View Post

I have a Vizio 32" plasma hooked to an indoor antenna. It pretty much gets the stations I want. However it does bring is a few "phantom channels", digital channels, when I do a can. For example it tells me it found channels 27-7 and 27-8. But going to those channels brings up 'no signal' response, unsurprising since these channels don't exist. And it does this consistently. That is, rescanning always brings up the same phantom channels. Any ideas on why this might be happening? Is the tuner in the Vizio too sensitive and some interference has it confused? Or is the tuner faulty? Any thoughts on correcting this behavior?

As a comparison, I use a Samsung DTB-H260F and a tuner from my Panasonic 3576 DVD recorder in another room. Since this room is one floor up I get more "good" (ie, valid) digital stations but with none of the phantoms.


Thanks.


_Larry

What channels do you normally recieve OTA? Might be getting some sort of intermod interference, though with digital ...? I'm more of an analog kind of guy and thus just speculating. Hard to know though without knowing what channels you normally receive. Also, are there any radio emitters near by? I'm not just talking about big radio towers, but cell transmitters, VHF/UHF radio transmitters, etc.
Satcom15 is offline  
post #201 of 248 Old 03-06-2009, 06:10 AM
Senior Member
 
Lazza's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 226
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I currently get the usual slew of local digital/analog OTA stations. But it is just with this Vizio it is reporting the existence of 4-5 additional stations which simply don't exist. Again my other digital receivers behave just fine.

As for potential interference, the only thing remotely possible is the existence of some 80-100' tower a few blocks away that has antenna-like/satellite stuff on it. It is located at my county's central police headquarters. I thought perhaps this tower only had transmission receivers. But maybe such a place would broadcast signals too???

It was my understanding that Vizio's had excellent tuners. Perhaps they are "too excellent" by picking up interference?


Thanks.


_Lazza
Lazza is offline  
post #202 of 248 Old 03-06-2009, 05:40 PM
Advanced Member
 
Desert Hawk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Bakersfield California
Posts: 979
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Vizio tuners suck. Channels must be scanned, no direct entry allowed. QAM channels without any PSIP sometimes can't be received, and sometimes will make the tv freeze up, requiring unplugging to reset it.

Phantom channels could be caused by flawed PSIP data by a station. It might be caused by non tv services being carried on a channel, such as the pay reading service for the blind carried by some PBS stations.

How can we say "the digital transition is complete" when thousands of low power stations are still broadcasting in analog?
LOW POWER ANALOG NEEDS TO DIE NOW!!!
Desert Hawk is offline  
post #203 of 248 Old 03-15-2009, 04:00 AM
Advanced Member
 
wvasko's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Central IL
Posts: 723
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by wvasko View Post

Well that ship has sailed as I already have the 7698, just not installed yet. Please keep fingers crossed. I'm going to pray to the reception gods and hope I haven't changed what I got, I'm thinking instead of stamps I will just have a good start on a antenna collection. I will get update out when weather breaks a tad and can get up tower safely. Ice and tower climbing don't mix well. I do have an installer and we discussed stuff and he thought the 7698 would be a good move. I purchased antenna from amazon so he didn't have a big vested interest in selling etc.

Just an update on above post. I did not upgrade antenna but did decide to upgrade rotor to a Yaesu G800SA, I will if needed go to a Winegard YA-1713 as I did not want to gamble with a signal degrade. I do like the reception I am getting but a faulty rotor was a big part of problem. I will now let the world take a few spins with new rotor.

Please, Dumb It Down For Me.
wvasko is offline  
post #204 of 248 Old 04-27-2009, 10:36 AM
Member
 
farley2k's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 15
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
First I should admit I haven't read through the whole thread, but I did read the first 2-3 pages!

I was just checking on what I would need to get OTA HD up and running. I just bought and HDTV (with built in tuner) so I wanted to get over the air signal. Our house already has an old antenna and I checked www.antennaweb.org and 2150.com for stations. It looks like I should be able to get the main networks and PBS which is all I expected.

What else do I need? I think the antenna on the roof has the old style two wires connection, do I need to get up there and put on a different kind?

I assume that my old TiVo series 2 will not record signal so I would have to buy a TiVo HD right?

And other than that I should be fine for getting signal...at least that is what I think so far. Am I missing something?

Thanks,
farley2k is offline  
post #205 of 248 Old 04-27-2009, 10:50 AM - Thread Starter
Super Moderator
 
DrDon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Metro Detroit
Posts: 12,535
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 39 Post(s)
Liked: 222
Not sure. You omitted your location in your profile, so I can't tell where you're from. Is your antenna VHF or a combo? Post transition, some of your stations may be VHF or UHF or a mixture of both. Check your local thread for more.

But, I'd definitely replace the twinlead with RG-6 coax and, depending on your location and the distance from the transmitters, a preamp.

Now go back and read through the WHOLE thread

Walking the fine line between jaw-dropping and a plain ol' yawn.
DrDon is online now  
post #206 of 248 Old 04-27-2009, 10:57 AM
Member
 
farley2k's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 15
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDon View Post

Not sure. You omitted your location in your profile, so I can't tell where you're from. Is your antenna VHF or a combo? Post transition, some of your stations may be VHF or UHF or a mixture of both. Check your local thread for more.

But, I'd definitely replace the twinlead with RG-6 coax and, depending on your location and the distance from the transmitters, a preamp.

Now go back and read through the WHOLE thread


Sorry. I am Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

As for the antenna....it is on the roof and that is high! So I haven't even taken a look at it. I am working through the CR thread right now but it is long! I had no idea there were that many people from eastern Iowa who posted.
farley2k is offline  
post #207 of 248 Old 05-18-2009, 06:08 PM
Member
 
PackFan72's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 17
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
What type of splitter do I need to split out my OTA antenna?
PackFan72 is offline  
post #208 of 248 Old 05-19-2009, 01:28 PM
Member
 
bozey45's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Pasco County FL
Posts: 103
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I just use a one input 2 output regular splitter made for outdoors that i got at a good old RS (I think). i didn't notice any signal loss. some of the posters might say there is but I don't notice any; my coax runs are relatively short; if you have long coax runs it might make a difference. They're not expensive so all you can do is try.
bozey45 is offline  
post #209 of 248 Old 05-25-2009, 10:39 PM
Member
 
mr100watt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: USA (Mid-Atlantic region)
Posts: 142
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Using one dipole antenna on an Insignia CECB, tuned to one UHF station in the afternoon locked in a clear signal. Adjacent to that hookup was an RCA model ANT145 VHF/UHF dipole/loop antenna with an inner plate and a fine tuning knob on a Pal Plus tuned to the same UHF station locked into the same clear signal at the same time. Daytime weather was clear and sunny, little wind.

That night with a small amount of rain barely coming down and a bit more of a breeze, I turned on my tv and to my surprise, neither box received any signal from the station that had come in clear that afternoon.

I had to experiment with pointing the antennas in various direction for some time before a picture was received, and for the first 15 minutes or so, the picture broke up. About fifteen minutes into the program, the picture reception was almost as steady as it was earlier in the day. (The rain had stopped and there was less of a breeze.)

What puzzled me was how different the position of the antenna was inorder to get the same degree of reception as earlier in the day.

I had the two antennas about twelve inches from each other with identical angular position of the dipoles, and both the Insignia and Pal Plus held the station's picture with almost identical strength.

I had a concern that the proximity of the antennas to each other might interfere with the reception on one or both of them, but it didn't seem to matter. The tuners/boxes were about two feet from each other and were at different levels from each other. I didn't know if the UHF loop/plate position would affect the dipole antenna connected to the Insignia.

With the RCA antenna, I don't understand the relationship between the dipoles and the UHF loop/plate for receiving the signal from the UHF station. I have to have the dipoles pointed in a particular direction at a particular angle yet I also have to have the "plate" for the UHF loop angled in a particular way to get the signal also - if I leave out one of these things, the station doesn't come in, or, at least, not as well.

What I have learned is that OTA reception from these converter boxes is going to be dependent on atmospheric conditions more than I'd like. I'd think that stations with a digital signal lower in the number assignment would result in a signal less affected by weather conditions since the signal transmission consists of longer wavelengths.

It seems that it is in the nature of these converter boxes, given the nature of digital transmision OTA, for reception to deteriorate proportional to deteriorating weather conditions. How do people in the midwest and surrounding areas watch tv on nights when there is a tornado in the area? The warning on the tv screen might not even be viewable. : O
mr100watt is offline  
post #210 of 248 Old 05-26-2009, 04:01 AM
AVS Special Member
 
ProjectSHO89's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 2,529
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Liked: 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by mr100watt View Post

Using one dipole antenna on an Insignia CECB, tuned to one UHF station in the afternoon locked in a clear signal. Adjacent to that hookup was an RCA model ANT145 VHF/UHF dipole/loop antenna with an inner plate and a fine tuning knob on a Pal Plus tuned to the same UHF station locked into the same clear signal at the same time. Daytime weather was clear and sunny, little wind.

That night with a small amount of rain barely coming down and a bit more of a breeze, I turned on my tv and to my surprise, neither box received any signal from the station that had come in clear that afternoon.

I had to experiment with pointing the antennas in various direction for some time before a picture was received, and for the first 15 minutes or so, the picture broke up. About fifteen minutes into the program, the picture reception was almost as steady as it was earlier in the day. (The rain had stopped and there was less of a breeze.)

What puzzled me was how different the position of the antenna was inorder to get the same degree of reception as earlier in the day.

I had the two antennas about twelve inches from each other with identical angular position of the dipoles, and both the Insignia and Pal Plus held the station's picture with almost identical strength.

I had a concern that the proximity of the antennas to each other might interfere with the reception on one or both of them, but it didn't seem to matter. The tuners/boxes were about two feet from each other and were at different levels from each other. I didn't know if the UHF loop/plate position would affect the dipole antenna connected to the Insignia.

With the RCA antenna, I don't understand the relationship between the dipoles and the UHF loop/plate for receiving the signal from the UHF station. I have to have the dipoles pointed in a particular direction at a particular angle yet I also have to have the "plate" for the UHF loop angled in a particular way to get the signal also - if I leave out one of these things, the station doesn't come in, or, at least, not as well.

What I have learned is that OTA reception from these converter boxes is going to be dependent on atmospheric conditions more than I'd like. I'd think that stations with a digital signal lower in the number assignment would result in a signal less affected by weather conditions since the signal transmission consists of longer wavelengths.

It seems that it is in the nature of these converter boxes, given the nature of digital transmision OTA, for reception to deteriorate proportional to deteriorating weather conditions. How do people in the midwest and surrounding areas watch tv on nights when there is a tornado in the area? The warning on the tv screen might not even be viewable. : O

It has nothing to do with the converter boxes themselves, per se. It's simply due to atmospheric degradation of the signal during weather events itself when you are too close to the edge of the the "digital cliff".

The only way you can step back from the edge of that cliff is to improve your antenna system.

Besides, a typical TV antenna dipole is too long for efficient UHF reception as they are for VHF frequencies. If you use the proper antenna, your reception will improve.
ProjectSHO89 is offline  
Reply HDTV Technical

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off