Any yagi antenna tilters non electronic? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 11 Old 01-02-2007, 07:38 PM - Thread Starter
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Surely there is a device that will tilt a small yagi style antenna without a motor attached. I have searched everywhere but can find no such device.
What I have in mind is a simple device like the satellite dishes use, with a C-shaped piece of metal and a wing nut that will lock it at different angles.
Does such a device exist? And if no, why not?
I just need to tilt my antenna up a couple of inches to get over a tree line in the distance and I really can't see spending the money on a motorized device.
Any help or links to manual devices is appreciated.
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post #2 of 11 Old 01-02-2007, 08:27 PM
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TV signals go pretty much in a straight line. They will go through trees with a little loss, so tilting your antenna will most likely make the signal weaker.
John
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post #3 of 11 Old 01-02-2007, 11:12 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ctdish View Post

TV signals go pretty much in a straight line. They will go through trees with a little loss, so tilting your antenna will most likely make the signal weaker.
John

The weight of my uhf portion points my antenna in a downward direction.
It only seems natural to me to be able to adjust an antenna left, right, up and down.
Is this to much to ask?
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post #4 of 11 Old 01-03-2007, 03:38 AM
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My Antenna has the Tilt Feature:http://www.antennasdirect.com/91XG_assembly.html

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post #5 of 11 Old 01-03-2007, 08:56 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DougRuss View Post

My Antenna has the Tilt Feature:http://www.antennasdirect.com/91XG_assembly.html

Well, at least that is an idea. Thanks.
Though with that solution I would lose my VHF digital channel 8-1.

All I need to do is raise the front end of my antenna about 1 or 2 inches.
I am not trying to aim it at the sky or anything.
I have already done this with my hands and got a 10 point improvement in my reception.
so I know it will work if I can find a cheap permanent solution.
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post #6 of 11 Old 01-03-2007, 05:54 PM
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There is no need to adjust front/back tilt for a yagi. The ideal yagi has a boom mounted level to the earth below. TV signals are broadcast horizontally. I would think you could adjust the boom/mast clamp enough to square up?
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post #7 of 11 Old 01-03-2007, 08:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcade View Post

Well, at least that is an idea. Thanks.
Though with that solution I would lose my VHF digital channel 8-1.

All I need to do is raise the front end of my antenna about 1 or 2 inches.
I am not trying to aim it at the sky or anything.
I have already done this with my hands and got a 10 point improvement in my reception.
so I know it will work if I can find a cheap permanent solution.

So buy an aluminum, 1" x 1" angle, drill a hole in your boom two or three feet in front of the U-bolt and pin it there, loosen the U bolt a little, and pin the other end of the angle iron to the mast.

Don't be surprised if the benefit is fleeting. In fact, if you were there,holding it while the readings were better, your physical interdiction of the electromagnetic filed might had accounted for the improvement. I once installed a vertically stacked second yagi antenna to eliminate some interference of unknown origin, and at one point, I accidentally connected one of the antennas to the wrong side of the combiner/splitter, so one antenna contributed about 20dB less signal strength that the other one, and while I was doing that, the guy in the building (we were using walkie talkies) said, "That's it", but when I came inside the picture sucked. It turned out that the interference was being phase canceled by the array, but the relative signal strength to optimize the phase cancellation was attained with me standing between the director elements of one of the antennas, since my body was acting as an attenuator pad does.

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post #8 of 11 Old 01-03-2007, 10:05 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AntAltMike View Post

So buy an aliminum, 1" x 1" angle, drill a hole in your boom two or three feet in front of the U-bolt and pin it there, loosen the U bolt a little, and pin the other end of the angle iron to the mast.

Don't be surprised if the benefit is fleeting. In fact, if you were there,holding it while the readings were better, your physical interdiction of the electromagnetic filed might had accounted for the improvement. I once installed a vertically stacked second yagi antenna to eliminate some interference of unknown origin, and at one point, I accidentally connected one of the antennas to the wrong side of the combiner/splitter, so one antenna contributed about 20dB less signal strength that the other one, and while I was doing that, the guy in the building (we were using walkie talkies) said, "That's it", but when I came inside the picture sucked. It turned out that the interference was being phase canceled by the array, but the relative signal strength to optimize the phase cancellation was attained with me standing between the director elements of one of the antennas, since my body was acting as an attenuator pad does.


Thanks. I already have similar device designed in my head to raise the level up a tad. I just thought that surely something already existed. If it has so little help then why do companies make expensive electronic tilt devices? I have a friend in metalworks so I can easily get my simple design made for me. I just find it hard to believe that I even have to go that far.

As far as my body affecting the the reception, that may be possible. But I was well under the antenna using a broom handle to push up the antenna. It don't think that I could have been close enough to really have much effect.

But my initial question has been answered.
No, there is no such device on the market. (Crazy).
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post #9 of 11 Old 01-04-2007, 12:12 AM
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I think the most common legitimate use is for ham radio reception. I once was called to submit a proposal for a company that wanted me to install some military-grade antenna tilters for yagi-style antennas to track some low eliptical orbit satellites.

If you look at the verticle polar response pattern of any Yagi antenna, you will see that the tilt of a few degrees is of no discernible benefit, but If you are right behind a steep hill, you might pick up a dB or two by matching the downward refraction angle.

If someone behind a hill is using a 4 bay or 8 bay bowtie, heĀ is more likely to benefit from a tilter than is someone with a single dipole antenna, since, with vertically-stacked, multi-bay bowties, the diffracted wavefront will be tilted forward from vertical, and if the mast is not tilted to match it, it will hit the dipoles out of perfect phase and will not be added to one another as efficiently.

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post #10 of 11 Old 11-04-2012, 03:02 AM
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On flat land you are right .But if you live in mountainous terrain like i do where there are plenty of hills and trees. I know from because i have done it .It will take a signal from the 30% barely watchable to the 80% . It depends on the terrain not on theory.
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post #11 of 11 Old 11-04-2012, 08:49 AM
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Many of the European antennas, such as by Kathrein, have a tilt adjustment. In much of Europe, the towers are very close to town, so you maight need an up-tilt to accurately point at them.
You could rig something with a small metal plate, and some added u-bolts, if you are handy with a drill press.

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