Using an American TV in Sweden (ATSC and DVB-T) - Page 2 - AVS Forum
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post #31 of 62 Old 07-30-2011, 12:08 PM
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I would expect that TV manufacturers for US bound sets would delete any content necessary for 50Hz playback in order to improve margins, since they ship large volumes to the US and the population which would actually use such capability is likely very tiny/tiny/tiny. Lets say it $1 to support 50 Hz and the ship 500,000 sets-thats half a million bucks in their pockets.

Maybe I am wrong?
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post #32 of 62 Old 07-30-2011, 02:40 PM
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My "unscientific" testing of LCDs showed the less you paid for a TV the more chance it would display PAL Cheaper and lesser name brand LCD many times displayed 50Hz but as for Sony, Panasonic, LG, etc. forget about it Vizio is probably the biggest name known to display 50Hz.
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post #33 of 62 Old 07-31-2011, 04:34 AM
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I've combed the forums for any info on LC-70LE732 support for 50Hz content. There are two separate mentions that it does - both from people who imported it from the US. One in Israel, the other in Singapore. The former even says that it did not need voltage transformer, i.e. there is support for 240V mains out of the box.
Regardless, I think that 50/60Hz support im modern TVs is basically handled by on the chip components, which can not be taken out at will. Producing two completely different image processor chips, would probably be more expensive. On the other hand, 60Hz only would make sense for US-only brands like Vizio.
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post #34 of 62 Old 07-31-2011, 04:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MindaLT View Post

I've combed the forums for any info on LC-70LE732 support for 50Hz content. There are two separate mentions that it does - both from people who imported it from the US. One in Israel, the other in Singapore. The former even says that it did not need voltage transformer, i.e. there is support for 240V mains out of the box.
Regardless, I think that 50/60Hz support im modern TVs is basically handled by on the chip components, which can not be taken out at will. Producing two completely different image processor chips, would probably be more expensive. On the other hand, 60Hz only would make sense for US-only brands like Vizio.

It is possible, these days, that the support is likely to be as much about firmware/software as it is about hardware.

The core functionality of HDTVs (excluding tuners) is likely to be implemented using similar chipsets in all models of TVs. However the operating firmware may well still be different. Whether US models include 50Hz support is presumably down to the implementation. There is no real market for it in the US (whereas in Europe 50 & 60Hz is a requirement to carry the standard licensed HDTV or HD Ready / HD Ready 1080p logos) However the software in US/European displays will vary significantly in many areas (we have different tuner standards - DVB-T/T2 vs ATSC 8VSB, different text standards - Closed Captioning vs WST/DVB Subs, digital text systems - MHP and MHEG5 etc.) so the software builds are likely to be significantly different.

I don't think anyone is suggesting the hardware is going to be significantly different (apart from tuners) - but there is a lot more to hardware involved in modern displays.

From what I've read in various forums, it appears that cheaper US displays (particularly those from no-name brands or OEM brands) are more likely to support 50Hz than high-end sets from Sony, Panasonic etc. I guess it isn't a case of not putting the right hardware in, more a case of writing/including software to cope.

Some HDMI chipsets were also 60Hz only at one point, though I suspect that is now no longer the case.
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post #35 of 62 Old 07-31-2011, 04:49 AM
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Originally Posted by jjeff View Post

My "unscientific" testing of LCDs showed the less you paid for a TV the more chance it would display PAL Cheaper and lesser name brand LCD many times displayed 50Hz but as for Sony, Panasonic, LG, etc. forget about it Vizio is probably the biggest name known to display 50Hz.

Yep - this seems to match the reports I've read of people trying to find 50Hz compatible displays in the US to watch R2 50Hz DVDs at the original refresh rate (without a poor quality conversion in the player)

However it does appear that some (all?) 70" Sharp models have 50Hz support. Wonder if this is because it's such a niche set they've not developed multiple variants of the core display implementation.
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post #36 of 62 Old 07-31-2011, 05:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MindaLT View Post

My interest is exactly the above. Primarily it will be media player display, only very rarely (if at all) used for broadcast TV.
It would still be useful to know whether LC-70LE732 supports 50Hz content. There are some bits of info that it does, but nothing certain. Also, can not find any info about LC-70LE732-5 model mentioned in this thread.

Suspect the -5 is a country variant. Could even be as boring as which type of mains connector is in the box.

(Over here most Sony TVs sold have a U at the end of their model name - presumably for UK - as we have a different mains plug to most of continental Europe...)
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post #37 of 62 Old 07-31-2011, 09:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sneals2000 View Post

From what I've read in various forums, it appears that cheaper US displays (particularly those from no-name brands or OEM brands) are more likely to support 50Hz than high-end sets from Sony, Panasonic etc. I guess it isn't a case of not putting the right hardware in, more a case of writing/including software to cope.

I think it's more a case of Sony setting the firmware of their US sets to not cope with 50Hz on purpose. They sued people who exported their products to Europe before. They're doing it so people in Europe don't import their US TVs, so they can charge more to the people in Europe. Sounds anti-competitive and discriminatory to me. I don't see why they need to do it since Europe would need different tuners anyway if you were watching TV - unless you were just using the tuners in a set top box.
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post #38 of 62 Old 07-31-2011, 10:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Joe Bloggs View Post

I think it's more a case of Sony setting the firmware of their US sets to not cope with 50Hz on purpose.

I also believe this, that is it may indeed cost a mfg. more to disable 50Hz, which would explain why companies trying to cut costs the most would not go to the expense of doing such a thing. It's also possible that companies doing huge volumes in N. America might save something by being only 60Hz, personally I don't know what the case is but I don't like it
My Vizio and Insignia(both display 50Hz just fine) are much smaller than my Sony or Panasonic. Luckily I rarely watch 50Hz material, my only source would be an old Aiwa PAL VCR and my international Panasonic DVDR thats both 50 and 60Hz depending on the source. Both are line output only, I have nothing that outputs RF PAL which I'm quite sure no standard US TV would decode.
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post #39 of 62 Old 07-31-2011, 12:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Bloggs View Post

I think it's more a case of Sony setting the firmware of their US sets to not cope with 50Hz on purpose. They sued people who exported their products to Europe before. They're doing it so people in Europe don't import their US TVs, so they can charge more to the people in Europe. Sounds anti-competitive and discriminatory to me. I don't see why they need to do it since Europe would need different tuners anyway if you were watching TV - unless you were just using the tuners in a set top box.

Yep - that's a very good thought. US sets are cheaper, and set top boxes and PVRs/DVRs for satellite, cable and OTA are all widespread. I don't use the internal tuners in my TV unless both tuners in my satellite PVR are in use.

The set top box market for OTA receivers and PVRs is much stronger in Europe than the US - so lacking an internal tuner is hardly the end of the world.

(Not directly related to this - but in Europe, more and more TVs with digital tuners now allow you to record digital TV - using integrated cable, satellite or terrestrial tuners - to external USB drives for timeshifting or pausing Live TV.)
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post #40 of 62 Old 07-31-2011, 12:15 PM
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Originally Posted by jjeff View Post

Both are line output only, I have nothing that outputs RF PAL which I'm quite sure no standard US TV would decode.

Same is true of displays sold in Europe. Whilst every set I have bought since around 1990 has supported NTSC (3.58 and 4.43 at 60Hz) and PAL (4.43 at 50 and 60Hz) composite line-level sources, they won't support NTSC-M OTA analogue RF and were PAL-I (early models) or PAL BGDKI/SECAM L only for OTA analogue RF. They are similarly DVB-T/T2/C and in some cases DVB-S/S2 only with no ATSC 8VSB or QAM tuners for digital TV.

Suspect European sets would be fine with an NTSC signal RF modulated onto a System BGDKIL carrier with System BGDKIL sound - mono, dual analogue stereo or NICAM digital though.
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post #41 of 62 Old 08-04-2011, 04:18 PM
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Hi Guys,

I will be moving soon back to Europe and I have a similar issue, the 720p / 1080p @ 50Hz-60Hz.
I used an Apple TV to test the Sony 46NX810 with both signals. Apple TV outputs a variety of video signals at 50 or 60Hz, probably this is common to must network players.
However, Sony did not recognize the 50Hz signal.

I remember about 5 years ago I have seen a Samsung here in US which advertise compatibility with both 50 an 60 Hz video signal, but at this time seems to be no TV set on the US market (so far I could find in the online specs) able to display a 50Hz signal. In addition, the only TV accepting 110-250V at 50-60HZ power source is the Sony.

I think the European live TV broadcast won't work on a US HDTV...except if the European DVB boxes, satellite or cable, can output video signal at 60Hz.

It will be helpful to know from one of the guys living in Europe if his sat or cable box has 720p/1080p at 60Hz output capability.
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post #42 of 62 Old 08-05-2011, 02:54 AM
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Originally Posted by vp-avs View Post

I think the European live TV broadcast won't work on a US HDTV...except if the European DVB boxes, satellite or cable, can output video signal at 60Hz.

It will be helpful to know from one of the guys living in Europe if his sat or cable box has 720p/1080p at 60Hz output capability.

AFAIK no mainstream European DVB-T/T2 (OTA), DVB-C (Cable), DVB-S/S2 (Satellite) set-top boxes or PVR/DVRs support 60Hz output. They usually support 576/50i, 720/50p and 1080/50i with some also supporting 1080/50p. Some don't always output 576/50i via HDMI and instead de-interlace SD content to 576/50p.

The only partial solution that I know of is to use a media streamer which can output at 60Hz and a DLNA/UPnP streaming option with a TV tuner card in a PC to serve Live TV to the device, or by using one of the few media streamers that will support a DVB USB tuner (usually DVB-T) as these can be fixed at 60Hz I believe.

However converting 50Hz TV to 60Hz in such a manner is likely to be pretty awful (10Hz frame repetition judder rather than any decent frame interpolation)

Unless you only want to watch 60Hz native sources - don't bother bringing a 60Hz-only US TV to Europe. You are far better off buying a 50/60Hz TV in Europe and having the ability to take it back to the US should you return. (All of our HD sets are 50/60Hz compatible for 720p and 1080i HDMI and Component - though they won't have ATSC/QAM/System-M tuners in them - an almost all will also cope with NTSC composite/S-video baseband/line sources as well. So as long as you can power them in the US you should have no problem with any US Component, HDMI, Composite or S-Video source as well as any European source whilst you're in Europe. The only thing you won't have is any OTA / Cable tuners compatible with US systems - so you'd need a set top box for any Live TV in the US)
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post #43 of 62 Old 08-05-2011, 06:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vp-avs View Post

I remember about 5 years ago I have seen a Samsung here in US which advertise compatibility with both 50 an 60 Hz video signal, but at this time seems to be no TV set on the US market (so far I could find in the online specs) able to display a 50Hz signal. In addition, the only TV accepting 110-250V at 50-60HZ power source is the Sony.

See past posts in this thread - Vizio TVs (and at least some Sharp TVs) are supposed to be able to.
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post #44 of 62 Old 06-20-2014, 08:25 PM
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I know threat is old but I hope to see experience of people who have moved their US TV to Europe
Any issues with their signal (satellite/cable) whether it's 50 or 60 I don't care.
Thank you
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post #45 of 62 Old 06-20-2014, 09:09 PM
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Anything that takes an HDMI input from a ota converter box or a cable box or Sat box will be fine.
Just step down the voltage.

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post #46 of 62 Old 06-21-2014, 06:04 AM
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Originally Posted by SMHarman View Post
Anything that takes an HDMI input from a ota converter box or a cable box or Sat box will be fine.
Just step down the voltage.

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that's what I'm intending to use, so the 50Hz vs 60Hz dillema is not an issue I hope
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post #47 of 62 Old 06-21-2014, 08:20 AM
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I thought the post was about ATSC -> DVB-T tuners? Go back and read Sneals2000 post.
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post #48 of 62 Old 06-21-2014, 07:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post
I thought the post was about ATSC -> DVB-T tuners? Go back and read Sneals2000 post.
you're probably right, it just there were more concerns with PAL NTSC 50Hz 60Hz. Sorry to confuse you
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post #49 of 62 Old 06-21-2014, 08:31 PM
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But these are all broadcast standards and you are not using the broadcast tuner. The tv is a dumb screen.

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post #50 of 62 Old 06-22-2014, 03:53 AM
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Couple of issues here :

1. ATSC vs DVB-T/T2/C

These are the OTA and Cable broadcast standards used in the US and Europe respectively. You will also (unlike the US) find TVs sold with DVB-S/S2 satellite tuners in Europe (as satellite is widespread as an OTA equivalent in some areas - like the UK)

Most TVs sold in the US or the EU will only have tuners suitable for their local broadcast format - so a US TV is unlikely to have a DVB-T/T2/C/S/S2 tuner and an EU TV is unlikely to have an ATSC tuner. (The same was true in the days of analogue TV - EU sets seldom had NTSC-M tuners and US sets seldom had PAL-BGIDK/SECAM-LBG tuners)

This means that there are usually different models sold in the US and the EU - with different RF sub-systems. There are also differences when it comes to things like closed captioning vs subtitles, digital interactive text services, SAP vs AD etc. which can mean significant differences between models sold in the two regions. Even the remote controls can be different.

In Europe, the market for external SD and HD DVB-T/T2, and -S/S2, single tuner set-top boxes (sometimes called "zappers") and dual-tuner DVR disc recorders is quite strong. You are able to buy them in supermarkets very easily and at relatively low cost.

2. 50Hz vs 60Hz

All TV broadcasts in the EU (with the exception of closed systems in US military bases I believe) are 50Hz. In the US all TV broadcasts are 60Hz.

In the EU, all TVs sold with the "HDTV", "HD Ready" or "HD Ready 1080p" logos are mandated to support inputs in both 50 and 60Hz. As such a TV bought in the EU is likely to work with no problems at all if plugged in using an HDMI cable to a US satellite or cable receiver, though it won't work with a US antenna or direct cable feed. (In fact most sets sold in the EU will also accept NTSC 3.58 analogue composite and S-video signals as well, alongside PAL 4.43 and SECAM 4.43 inputs)

In the US there is no such licensing requirement. As a result many 'big name brand' TVs only accept 60Hz inputs via HDMI and/or component and won't lock to a 50Hz HDMI feed, which would be output by an EU digital set-top box (aka OTA Converter box - though that term is not used here). So bringing a 'big name' (Sony, Panasonic etc.) US TV to the EU may well cause problems if you connect it to an EU digital receiver via HDMI. It will work with games consoles and Blu-ray players (though may not work with some EU 50i Blu-ray releases - like most recent BBC shows)

I've had practical experience of 50Hz with US TVs. I made a show in Hawaii a couple of years ago, and we were working 1080/50i (i.e. EU frame rates) to avoid standards conversion (lighting flicker wasn't an issue). We needed a 50Hz in-vision monitor, and though we'd brought one with us from the UK, it wasn't perfectly suited, so we tried all the TVs we could that were available (I brought a WDTV Live media player configured for 50Hz 1080i HD output to test in store.) The Panasonic and Sony models refused to work with a 50Hz HDMI 1080/50i input. The Chinese no-name model in our hotel room worked fine...

My guess is that Sony, Panasonic etc. make very specific models for the North American ATSC market - and don't bother implementing 50Hz modes (even if the core hardware can cope, I doubt they waste dev time writing firmware/software and testing support for it) whereas I suspect Chinese models are much more "universal" in both hardware and firmware/software? (They may also have fewer region specific customisations)

However as 50/60Hz support is mandated in Europe, they can't take this route in Europe and have to support and test 60Hz.
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post #51 of 62 Old 06-22-2014, 03:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SMHarman View Post
But these are all broadcast standards and you are not using the broadcast tuner. The tv is a dumb screen.

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Yes - but EU screens support 60Hz as well as 50Hz. US screens are much more hit and miss when it comes to 50Hz support - so you have zero guarantee that a US TV imported to Europe will work with the 50Hz output of European external receiver boxes unless you can find someone who has already proved support, or you can test before you go (relatively straightforward if you have a PC with an HDMI output).

Annoyingly most TV manufacturers don't include refresh rate support in their specs - just resolution...
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post #52 of 62 Old 06-22-2014, 04:02 AM
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Originally Posted by anis_ber View Post
that's what I'm intending to use, so the 50Hz vs 60Hz dillema is not an issue I hope
The 50/60Hz issue is very real. If your US TV doesn't support 50Hz sources you won't be able to connect a European set-top box successfully via HDMI. Finding out whether your US TV supports 50Hz can be a challenge.

If you have a PC or Mac with HDMI output, try connecting it to the HDMI input of your TV and then checking what refresh rates your PC says are supported in the graphics drivers or resolution control panels (it may be in the advanced section). If you have a 60Hz only set you will probably only see some or all of the following : 23,24,29,30,59,60Hz (in a mix of progressive and interlaced versions) If you have a 50/60Hz set you should also see 50 (and possibly 25) in the list of supported refresh rates (again in a mix of progressive and interlaced).

If you can select one of the 1280x720 or 1920x1080 at 50p or 50i or 25i (depends on nomenclature) and get a picture, congratulations, your TV supports 50Hz HDMI.

If 25/50 isn't reported or if selected doesn't work (unlikely as the TV should tell your graphics drivers what refresh rates it supports via EDID) then bad luck, your TV has no 50Hz support.
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post #53 of 62 Old 06-22-2014, 04:56 AM
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Once again regulation working well for the people of the European Union.

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post #54 of 62 Old 06-22-2014, 01:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sneals2000 View Post
The 50/60Hz issue is very real. If your US TV doesn't support 50Hz sources you won't be able to connect a European set-top box successfully via HDMI. Finding out whether your US TV supports 50Hz can be a challenge.

If you have a PC or Mac with HDMI output, try connecting it to the HDMI input of your TV and then checking what refresh rates your PC says are supported in the graphics drivers or resolution control panels (it may be in the advanced section). If you have a 60Hz only set you will probably only see some or all of the following : 23,24,29,30,59,60Hz (in a mix of progressive and interlaced versions) If you have a 50/60Hz set you should also see 50 (and possibly 25) in the list of supported refresh rates (again in a mix of progressive and interlaced).

If you can select one of the 1280x720 or 1920x1080 at 50p or 50i or 25i (depends on nomenclature) and get a picture, congratulations, your TV supports 50Hz HDMI.

If 25/50 isn't reported or if selected doesn't work (unlikely as the TV should tell your graphics drivers what refresh rates it supports via EDID) then bad luck, your TV has no 50Hz support.
great trick, except it made me more confused, I tried that first on my Samsung F8500, it surprisingly showed all refresh rates including 50Hz 25Hz. I tried it on the LG EA9800 (only 23,24,29,30,59,60 displayed, no 25 or 50Hz displayed). I went to Bestbuy with laptop and HDMI cable, basically only 3 TVs F8500, OLED samsung, RCA displayed 50Hz, rest including LG, Sony, Panasonic, Vizio did not(tried 15 TVs or so)
What does it mean? have no idea, I would have been more confident if LG did show 50Hz but it's not the case. Many users in R2i forum have taken their TV to india with good results.
I guess I have to ask someone who has no issues overseas to do this laptop-hdmi-tv test and see f it displays 50Hz
Decision Decision...

Please join this thread and respond there since it's specific to the question I have
120V 50-60Hz TV to Europe, is it possible?
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post #55 of 62 Old 06-22-2014, 02:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anis_ber View Post
great trick, except it made me more confused, I tried that first on my Samsung F8500, it surprisingly showed all refresh rates including 50Hz 25Hz. I tried it on the LG EA9800 (only 23,24,29,30,59,60 displayed, no 25 or 50Hz displayed). I went to Bestbuy with laptop and HDMI cable, basically only 3 TVs F8500, OLED samsung, RCA displayed 50Hz, rest including LG, Sony, Panasonic, Vizio did not(tried 15 TVs or so)
What does it mean?
That isn't that surprising. The OLED Samsung is a very high-end device and I wouldn't be surprised if Samsung made a global "back end" model and added modules for localisation - rather than localising everything. RCA is now effectively a Korean company (the RCA TV trademark is owned by ON Corporation of South Korea).

I'm not surprised that the bulk of the US TVs you tried were not 50Hz compatible as reported by your Laptop. The Laptop will respond to the EDID data sent back from the TV to the source via the HDMI Cable. This EDID data contains a list of the refresh rates and formats supported by the display.

If the PC doesn't display a 25/50Hz format then it is VERY likely that the TV won't work with a 50Hz set top box. Effectively the display is saying, via EDID, I don't support 25/50Hz refresh rates, don't send them to me. For a 25/50Hz only set-top box this means - I can't display your picture.

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have no idea, I would have been more confident if LG did show 50Hz but it's not the case. Many users in R2i forum have taken their TV to india with good results.
You need to find out the specific model of TV that has been taken, the specific model of set top box that is feeding it AND whether that set top box has the option of converting the 50Hz TV it receives to 60Hz. Most European set top boxes don't do this - but some FTA Receivers will. The results of a consumer 50->60Hz conversion are junk - but better than a blank screen I guess.
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I guess I have to ask someone who has no issues overseas to do this laptop-hdmi-tv test and see f it displays 50Hz
Decision Decision...
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post #56 of 62 Old 06-22-2014, 03:00 PM
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Once again regulation working well for the people of the European Union.

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Yep - mobile roaming voice/data charges are another bonus...
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post #57 of 62 Old 06-22-2014, 03:14 PM
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Originally Posted by sneals2000 View Post
That isn't that surprising. The OLED Samsung is a very high-end device and I wouldn't be surprised if Samsung made a global "back end" model and added modules for localisation - rather than localising everything. RCA is now effectively a Korean company (the RCA TV trademark is owned by ON Corporation of South Korea).

I'm not surprised that the bulk of the US TVs you tried were not 50Hz compatible as reported by your Laptop. The Laptop will respond to the EDID data sent back from the TV to the source via the HDMI Cable. This EDID data contains a list of the refresh rates and formats supported by the display.

If the PC doesn't display a 25/50Hz format then it is VERY likely that the TV won't work with a 50Hz set top box. Effectively the display is saying, via EDID, I don't support 25/50Hz refresh rates, don't send them to me. For a 25/50Hz only set-top box this means - I can't display your picture.


You need to find out the specific model of TV that has been taken, the specific model of set top box that is feeding it AND whether that set top box has the option of converting the 50Hz TV it receives to 60Hz. Most European set top boxes don't do this - but some FTA Receivers will. The results of a consumer 50->60Hz conversion are junk - but better than a blank screen I guess.
Thx for your input, I'd appreciate if you respond in the other thread instead.
But I believe you are right, apart from Samsung F8500 and OLED others don't support 50Hz, but according to the Indian forumers and the guys in the other thread, the TV was working overseas but displaying 60Hz instead. I'm planning to use dreambox very good FTA receiver, I'm familiar with it, it has option for 50Hz, 60Hz or even Multi.

I'm just worried there will be stuttering due to handeling 60Hz for 50Hz material but nobody had such complaints, which means conversion is smooth and effective
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post #58 of 62 Old 06-22-2014, 03:33 PM
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I have a DM800HD - yes it will output a 60Hz over HDMI when receiving 50Hz signals - though I think only 720p not 1080i. It does a straight frame repetition (which it can do with progressive signals but is trickier with interlaced - so it will do a de-interlace from 1080/50i to 720/50p and then a frame repeat to 720/60p)

Whether you want to watch it is a different matter.

For the occasional SD channel - then I'd probably put up with it. For my main HDTV viewing - not a chance. I'd be throwing it out of the window after 5 minutes.
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post #59 of 62 Old 06-23-2014, 04:38 PM
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Originally Posted by sneals2000 View Post
I have a DM800HD - yes it will output a 60Hz over HDMI when receiving 50Hz signals - though I think only 720p not 1080i. It does a straight frame repetition (which it can do with progressive signals but is trickier with interlaced - so it will do a de-interlace from 1080/50i to 720/50p and then a frame repeat to 720/60p)

Whether you want to watch it is a different matter.

For the occasional SD channel - then I'd probably put up with it. For my main HDTV viewing - not a chance. I'd be throwing it out of the window after 5 minutes.
I'm not sure where you get such information about outputing 60Hz in 720p and not 1080i
Is there a way to test for that?
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post #60 of 62 Old 06-23-2014, 05:26 PM
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I'm not sure where you get such information about outputing 60Hz in 720p and not 1080i
Is there a way to test for that?
May be based on what image you run on your Dreambox (I'm running OpenPli) - but I was quoting from the experience of using my DM800HD (non-SE).

I only get the option to set the frame rate of the output to a fixed 60Hz when I select 720p as the resolution. If I select one of the other resolutions I don't get that option - presumably it passes through the broadcast frame rate instead. My TV accepts 480/60i, 480/60p, 576/50i, 576/50p, 720/50p, 720/60p, 1080/50i, 1080/60i, 1080/24p, 1080/50p and 1080/60p inputs via HDMI - and correctly reports this via EDID so it's not an issue with my TV not accepting 1080/60i etc.

My guess was that it was easier to frame-rate convert a de-interlaced or native progressive image than an interlaced one.

Thinking about it you can't frame repeat an interlaced image - as if there was motion between fields within the frame (as would be the case with native interlaced content) you'd have issues of repeated motion, and field repetition is tricky. To do it properly you'd have to de-interlace 1080/50i to 1080/50p and then frame repeat to 1080/60p and then re-interlace to 1080/60i. Much easier to de-interlace and scale (if non-720p) to 720/50p and then frame repeat to 720/60p.

(My experience of cheap US DVD players that did 50<->60 conversion was that they often dropped to 25/30Hz motion when frame rate converting - presumably by doing a crude field-drop - to allow them to frame repeat interlaced content without motion repetition)

BTW - if you're worried about the resolution loss from de-interlacing 1080/50i to 720/60p - I wouldn't worry about that. The frame rate conversion will be far worse a quality drop.

Other Dreambox models may well do a 1080/60p output these days - my DM800HD doesn't.

Last edited by sneals2000; 06-23-2014 at 05:37 PM.
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