Device to capture and record HDMI 1080p? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 7 Old 11-06-2008, 01:22 PM - Thread Starter
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I've seen the thread on the GEFEN box and threads on video capture cards, but I don't think they are what I'm looking for. Let me start out by stating what I'm trying to accomplish, and then if you have any ideas, please point me in the right direction.

My company sells high quality fiber optic cables. We would like to create a demonstration that transmits video over a fiber optic link at high bit rates. Bit rates approaching 10Gbps would be ideal. I have found a device from Extron that seems like a pretty good fit, but I'm wondering how we create a high bit rate stream that we can repeat in the demonstration. The ideal thing would be to capture a 1080p/60fps stream to a hard drive and then be able to loop that image, while altering parameters of the fiber optic cable.

Oddly one of the few video sources that might be able to create a 1080p/60 image is the PS3 with some of the newer HD games. Since this is an interactive situation, I would like to be able to capture a gaming sequence and use that as a repeatable source. I think Sony makes a hard drive device that will capture and play back HD material, but I don't know if it does it at the HDMI level. All the HD camcorders I've looked at only do 1080p at 24 or 30 fps. The Extron box says it works with signals up to 1600x1200 60p, so it may not exactly fit the bill for converting from DVI to a serial optical signal.

If there are blu-ray discs that are mastered and play back at 1080p/60 that would also work and eliminate this capture requirement, but I don't know if any are encoded that way or not.

Anyone out there have any experience with this sort of thing, or have any ideas? Would a PC game allow for 1600x1200 60fps output? I have built high performance PCs for HTPC applications and gaming, but I'm not a gamer myself (motion sickness problems), so any input would be appreciated.

Thanks,
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post #2 of 7 Old 11-06-2008, 04:12 PM
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Most pc games today support support 1920x1080 @60hz. There are some tricks for older games to run at that resolution though some are not perfect.
http://www.widescreengamingforum.com...Games_List_-_A
With a good enough pc you can smoothly output 1080p through DVI, HDMI, ,VGA or whatever you want.
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post #3 of 7 Old 11-06-2008, 05:05 PM
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With a good enough pc you can smoothly output 1080p through DVI, HDMI, ,VGA or whatever you want.

But you can't capture it, which is what he's trying to do.

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If there are blu-ray discs that are mastered and play back at 1080p/60 that would also work

Good question - certainly not movies, but I'm not sure about the "Planet Earth" series or something that was shot on HD-Video
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post #4 of 7 Old 11-06-2008, 05:16 PM
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Fraps could do it... quote: "Fraps can capture audio and video up to 2560x1600 with custom frame rates from 10 to 100 frames per second"

Then, just edit the resulting videos together with transitions.

Edit: Forgot to mention..... you will need a PC with a monitor set at 1920x1080 and capable of running the latest high-end games in the best quality at this resolution. Something like a core 2 quad with sli 9800GTs.

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post #5 of 7 Old 11-06-2008, 05:19 PM
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Fraps could do it

Sounds perfect - embarassed I didn't think of that...
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post #6 of 7 Old 11-07-2008, 01:54 PM - Thread Starter
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Thanks for the comments so far. I was not aware of what Fraps is. Doing a Google search on it, it seems to be software that will allow capturing a video sequence from a game played on a high performance PC, and I assume being able to replay that capture.

That does seem to be a means to achieve what we are hoping to do. On the one comment about Blu-ray mastered on HD video, that is something I was curious about as well. I thought that HD video cameras were out there that would film at 60fps, but when looking at commercial entries from Sony, JVC and Canon, I couldn't find any. So, I wasn't sure if any available Blu-ray disc were actually recorded in this manner. I'll post in the Blu-ray software area to see if anyone knows!

In any case, I don't really want to spend the money on a video camera that would have that capability for the purposes of this demonstration. It is a corporate initiave and not my personal money, but it won't be approved if really expensive. So, maybe building a quad core SLI PC and connecting it to the Extron box would be the most cost effective solution, unless a 1080p 60fps Blu-ray title is available!

Thanks again for the help!

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post #7 of 7 Old 11-07-2008, 02:40 PM
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First you might want to be more specific that about the "Extron box". Extron makes a large assortment of video components - any which could fit the "box" description.

Frame Grabbers can capture high definition sources. An Accustream 170 (Forsight Imaging) frame grabber card that's been around for a couple of years can capture up to 1600 x 1200 at 60 Hz. This card works well with Windows Media Encoder.

Perhaps another approach might be to use your fiber optic cable as the interconnect between a fiber optic KVM receiver and transmitter. Check here:

http://www.thinklogical.com/product.asp?ID=6.

That KVM can do:
DVI: 1920 X 1200 @ 60Hz
RGB: 1920 x 1200 @ 72 Hz or
1400 x 1050 @108 Hz

In addition to transmitting the Keyboard/Video/Mouse information, it also transports full duplex stereo audio, serial (RS-232), USB 1.0 (HID) device ports and USB 1.1. You have to check the specs to verify if this meets your bit rate requirements.
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