Recommend Server Board - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 21 Old 05-07-2012, 07:33 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
stepmback's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 1,779
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 13
I am looking for a good server board for a soon to be built WHS 2011 server with FlexRaid. It will be going into a Norco 4220 20HD server. I plan on using one of he new Ivy Chips from intel so it needs to be an LGA 1155 compatible.

My wish list includes
USB 3.0, at least 6 SATA ports, preferably SATA III, Intel NIC, solidly built for less than $300?

Thanks,
stepmback is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 21 Old 05-07-2012, 07:46 AM
Senior Member
 
Lars99's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 298
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Any particular reason you want a server board? Unless you have a need for ESXi, ECC memory, or some other specific function, any standard 1155 board will work. WHS and FlexRaid do not benefit for a vast majority of the applications from a server board.

Also, since you are going with a Norco and presumably plan to expand to or near 20 drives, I would recommend a board that has 2 x4 PCI-E slots so you can add SAS expanders. There are quite a few around 100$. If you don't plan on running a SSD for your OS (which I don't recommend if you are budget conscious) then H61/H67 boards would be sufficient. The new Ivy boards for a few bucks more also offer some minor benefits and may be worth considering the final cost of your system.

Lastly, if you plan on running just FlexRaid and WHS 2011, the current batch of Ivy chips, the i5 and i7 are way overkill. A G620 is more then sufficient.
Lars99 is offline  
post #3 of 21 Old 05-07-2012, 02:22 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
stepmback's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 1,779
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars99 View Post

Any particular reason you want a server board? Unless you have a need for ESXi, ECC memory, or some other specific function, any standard 1155 board will work. WHS and FlexRaid do not benefit for a vast majority of the applications from a server board.

Also, since you are going with a Norco and presumably plan to expand to or near 20 drives, I would recommend a board that has 2 x4 PCI-E slots so you can add SAS expanders. There are quite a few around 100$. If you don't plan on running a SSD for your OS (which I don't recommend if you are budget conscious) then H61/H67 boards would be sufficient. The new Ivy boards for a few bucks more also offer some minor benefits and may be worth considering the final cost of your system.

Lastly, if you plan on running just FlexRaid and WHS 2011, the current batch of Ivy chips, the i5 and i7 are way overkill. A G620 is more then sufficient.

Thanks Lars. I do want a little bit of overkill to want my current needs are. The reason being to future proof myself. I want to build a box that will last me 5 plus years and do not want to tinker with the hardware once it is setup.

My only needs now are file storage and transcoding and optimal speed for streaming and transfer. I have considered getting some SAS expanders, is pcie 4x all that is neeeded? What about sas on pcie x8 or x16... If they even make them?
stepmback is offline  
post #4 of 21 Old 05-07-2012, 08:34 PM
Senior Member
 
Lars99's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 298
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
PCI-e is downscable. If a card needs X4, it will also work in an x8 or x16 lane.

Futureproofing isn't really a relevant concept in the file server arena. It's a very non-cpu intensive operation as it is. A fileserver setup today will work 5 years from now.
Even so, you could look towards some of the nicer boards, but still no reason for a server board. Purchase what makes you happy, but know you won't get much value from a return on your investment.
Lars99 is offline  
post #5 of 21 Old 05-09-2012, 07:12 AM
Member
 
tcs2tx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 188
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars99 View Post

Any particular reason you want a server board? Unless you have a need for ESXi, ECC memory, or some other specific function, any standard 1155 board will work. WHS and FlexRaid do not benefit for a vast majority of the applications from a server board.

Media servers are often situated out of the way. Media servers are also often used to play back content for family members that are not capable of troubleshooting the server if anything is wrong. If either of these apply to you, I highly recommend using a server board with IPMI or something similar. A link to a review of the Supermicro X8SIL-F board in my server.

http://www.servethehome.com/supermic...v2-diy-server/

The following quote from the review sums it up pretty good:

"IPMI 2.0 is simply a must-have home server feature ... It is a major differentiator as I have had to remotely reboot a system that had ESXi (along with guest OSes) freeze in the past. Using IPMI 2.0, I could just log in and power cycle the box versus having to physically reset the machine."

The board has an extra LAN port dedicated to IPMI. The server can be locked up or even turned completely off, but the IPMI allows you to remotely log in and take control of the server with even keyboard, mouse and video access. This is a great feature when the wife calls me at work with the kids screaming in the background because the movies aren't playing.
tcs2tx is offline  
post #6 of 21 Old 05-09-2012, 08:15 AM
AVS Special Member
 
hirent's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: In my imagination!
Posts: 1,648
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by stepmback View Post

The reason being to future proof myself. I want to build a box that will last me 5 plus years and do not want to tinker with the hardware once it is setup.

Future-proof is in the mind; there is no such thing as future-proof.
I have HTPC's running E4500 processors. Its at least a 5 year old CPU and it gets the job done as far as the application goes. It can play BDs, DVDs and everything I care to throw at it. And 5 years down the line, it will still play all these files.
I would advise you to save your money now by only spending for what is needed. A few years down the line, if your application changes, you would be able to buy something new with the saved money.
Get a board with 8-10 SATA connectors and 3-4 PCIe slots for expansion. This will be more suited for your server application as it allows for future expansion cards.

Edit: Check out these boards, they are LGA1366 boards but come with 10 SATA ports plus numerous PCIE slots for expansion cards. The EVGA comes with 7 slots!!
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16813188078
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...2E16813128423R
hirent is offline  
post #7 of 21 Old 05-09-2012, 08:54 AM
AVS Special Member
 
lockdown571's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 1,623
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 58
One reason to get a beefy CPU for a media server is video transcoding. If you want to transcode blu-ray rips to multiple devices, then the faster the CPU the better.
lockdown571 is online now  
post #8 of 21 Old 05-09-2012, 10:29 AM
AVS Special Member
 
blueiedgod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Amherst, NY
Posts: 1,475
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Liked: 61
Speaking of future proofing. If all you want your server to do is store files, i.e. no transcoding no active torrent search, ect..., I am still runing a Pentium II 233 MHz MMX with an PCI-to-SATAII controller and 4x 2 Tb drives. Works just fine.

6 TV's in the house on FiOS and we only pay $4.99/month to connect them all!!! Power to the CableCard and WMC7!!!
blueiedgod is offline  
post #9 of 21 Old 05-09-2012, 07:11 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
Mfusick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Western MA
Posts: 21,568
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 71 Post(s)
Liked: 673
ASUS Z77 DELUXE.

has every feature you would ever want on a motherboard- including DUAL INTEL LAN.

WIFI for hotspots and network media sharing.

Blutooth.

DLNA.

Lots of cool new cutting edge features packed into many SATA ports- and high end and high performance ASUS quality.

It will run a SANDY or IVY, overclock it hard beyond 5ghz--- even run DDR3 @3000mhz! without breaking a sweat.

The memory controller on the Z77 ASUS is superior to other LGA1155 boards, both other brands- and other chipsets like Z68/67/h61

I doubt there is any feature you could find or want it does not have and it's cheaper than your budget.

Asus is probably the best motherboard available
Deluxe is Asus most feature packed and performance oriented non ROG board.
Z77 is the best available LGA1155 Chipset.

Seems like a no brainer for a $300 or under budget. You can get it at Microcenter for additional $50 off ($219) with any i5 or i7 CPU.

-

"Too much is almost enough. Anything in life worth doing is worth overdoing. Moderation is for cowards."
Mfusick is online now  
post #10 of 21 Old 05-09-2012, 07:11 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
Mfusick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Western MA
Posts: 21,568
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 71 Post(s)
Liked: 673
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

ASUS Z77 DELUXE.

has every feature you would ever want on a motherboard- including DUAL INTEL LAN.

WIFI for hotspots and network media sharing.

Blutooth.

DLNA.

Lots of cool new cutting edge features packed into many SATA ports- and high end and high performance ASUS quality.

It will run a SANDY or IVY, overclock it hard beyond 5ghz--- even run DDR3 @3000mhz! without breaking a sweat.

The memory controller on the Z77 ASUS is superior to other LGA1155 boards, both other brands- and other chipsets like Z68/67/h61

I doubt there is any feature you could find or want it does not have and it's cheaper than your budget.

Asus is probably the best motherboard available
Deluxe is Asus most feature packed and performance oriented non ROG board.
Z77 is the best available LGA1155 Chipset.

Seems like a no brainer for a $300 or under budget. You can get it at Microcenter for additional $50 off ($219) with any i5 or i7 CPU.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16813131818

-

"Too much is almost enough. Anything in life worth doing is worth overdoing. Moderation is for cowards."
Mfusick is online now  
post #11 of 21 Old 05-09-2012, 08:28 PM
Senior Member
 
duff99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 368
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 16
I'm going to say be careful with these new Z77 boards, they may not have all the kinks worked out yet. I've just had the worst experience I've ever had with a computer from 2 Asus P877-V Pro boards. This is the board right below the deluxe. I choose it for the same reasons you listed.

I've primarily built with Gigabyte in the past. The exceptions being one other Asus and a Supermicro server board, and I've built quite a few systems over the last few years. I decided to try out Asus this time, again for just the reasons you listed. The first board actually burst into flames. I'm talking actual burn your house down fire. I still had my old i7 920 system running and was testing out the build with some extra hardware, so fortunately it didn't have my good stuff in it. I put a GT440 video card in it a booted up. I smelled a little burning smell, but put it off because I couldn't find the source and it went away. Later on I put a AMD 5450 in it to try out. As soon as I pushed the power button flames shot up from the PCIex slot. I quickly shut the machine down. If I didn't have the side of the case off, and I hadn't been looking right at it, this could have been worse. Upon further examination I noticed that the GT440 card didn't have have pins in all the possible spaces on the bottom of the card, this must have been what saved it. Although it does have some damage, and doesn't seem to be working quite right anymore. The AMD card is literally toast. Now keep in mind that this system had been running for a couple hours at this point.

So I go to return the board to MicroCenter. They claim that there are bent pins in the processor socket and can not exchange it. I suspect that I messed them up trying to put the cap back on it. Asus does it differently from Gigabyte so I screwed it up trying to put it on. Later I barely touched it while checking it out and bent a pin. Extremely flimsy. I haggled a little, bit the bullet and got another board. While this board didn't self destruct, I really wish it would have. It should kill itself for all the grief it has caused me. It started with the memory. I got 2 8GB sticks of 1866 ram. I could barely get it run at 1066. I was planning a RMA for the ram. I was thinking that this was the first bad set of ram I've ever had. Later I tried three other sets of known good ram, none would run at rated speed. Even the 1333 stuff. Pretty sad. I threw the 1866 ram in a Gigabyte board and it booted right up at even tighter timings then specced at.

With the system running I'm plagued by non functional USB ports, random USB drop outs with the ports that seemed to work. The occasional random crashes and stutters while playing videos have really pushed me over the edge. Theres nothing like listening to the beeps of the USB connect disconnect for hours till you think to shut off system sounds. The only reason I haven't brought this board back already is because I had finals this week and couldn't afford the distraction.

I really do apologize for the rant, but it leads up to my point. This is a server. When your building a server the only reason not to use a server board is to save money. If you've got the budget buy a server board. You seem to since your looking a boards that cost more then most Supermicro's. These boards just work. They come with two Intel NIC's, IPMI, and confirmed reliability. These boards will provide dependable service for as long as you need. I'm switching to a Gigabyte board when I return the Asus tomorrow, but even it seems to have a lot of negative comments. It just doesn't seem like like the Z77 boards are fully baked yet, maybe after a few bios updates, just not now. Don't take the chance, go with something you know will work.
duff99 is offline  
post #12 of 21 Old 05-09-2012, 08:46 PM
Newbie
 
Alecthar's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Germany
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by stepmback View Post

I am looking for a good server board for a soon to be built WHS 2011 server with FlexRaid. It will be going into a Norco 4220 20HD server. I plan on using one of he new Ivy Chips from intel so it needs to be an LGA 1155 compatible.

My wish list includes
USB 3.0, at least 6 SATA ports, preferably SATA III, Intel NIC, solidly built for less than $300?

Thanks,

I'm assuming you have very basic needs. Your wish list doesn't include any form of virtualization support, ECC RAM hardly matters in a home environment, and it doesn't sound like virtually any other feature common to an actual server motherboard is genuinely important to you. The only way you get more than 2 SATA 6Gb/s ports is on a higher end 1155 motherboard or by going AM3+, and given that you're running spindle drives, you really don't need SATA 6Gb/s, it's just additional bandwidth you'll never use.

If Intel NIC is really important to you, then my recommendation would be to look for an ASUS P8P67 Pro board. I'm sure they're still available at some outlets online, or via eBay or a brick and mortar location I own one I use in an enthusiast system that has done beautifully for me. You can also look into the Intel BOXDP67BGB3 board. The key is really a board with at least 2 PCI-E slots running at x4 each. This allows you to use SAS expander cards in the PCI-E slots to provide the rest of the connections necessary to use all of your case's hotswap bays. Unfortunately, on LGA1155, a lot of those boards are P67 boards, at least when you talk about standard consumer boards. There are some server boards, like the Super Micro MBD-X9SCL-O around that price (~$160.00), that provide the necessary PCI-E slots, but the back panel connectivity is extremely limited (no USB 3.0, only 2 USB 2.0) though you do get dual Intel NICs. These boards are also limited in terms of processors (only Xeon E3s or Core i3s and below, Sandy Bridge), and only take ECC memory, which is more expensive.

I'd say you're better off spending half or less than that of the $300 limit you set. A basic media server demands little, just enough horsepower to keep up with 5400 RPM drives (that's not a lot of horsepower). A high-end enthusiast board is overkill, especially one on a dying socket. Similarly, Ivy Bridge is unnecessary, especially right now, when the best procs for basic server use (the new i3s and Pentiums, with lower TDPs) aren't even out yet.

If you must have SATA 6Gb/s and USB 3.0, buy a P67 motherboard with an Intel NIC and sufficient connectivity to meet your needs and call it a day.
Alecthar is offline  
post #13 of 21 Old 05-09-2012, 08:49 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
assassin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 12,894
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 205
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alecthar View Post

Similarly, Ivy Bridge is unnecessary, especially right now, when the best procs for basic server use (the new i3s and Pentiums, with lower TDPs) aren't even out yet.

You can use a Sandy Bridge in an Ivy Bridge board and upgrade later if you want.


The Ivy boards really aren't any more expensive.
assassin is offline  
post #14 of 21 Old 05-09-2012, 08:52 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
Mfusick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Western MA
Posts: 21,568
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 71 Post(s)
Liked: 673
how about the Asus Z77 WS ?

It's pretty much as bad assed as you can get on LGA1155.

Aside from that your looking at LGA2011

-

"Too much is almost enough. Anything in life worth doing is worth overdoing. Moderation is for cowards."
Mfusick is online now  
post #15 of 21 Old 05-09-2012, 08:54 PM
Newbie
 
Alecthar's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Germany
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by duff99 View Post

I'm going to say be careful with these new Z77 boards, they may not have all the kinks worked out yet. I've just had the worst experience I've ever had with a computer from 2 Asus P877-V Pro boards. This is the board right below the deluxe. I choose it for the same reasons you listed.

I've primarily built with Gigabyte in the past. The exceptions being one other Asus and a Supermicro server board, and I've built quite a few systems over the last few years. I decided to try out Asus this time, again for just the reasons you listed. The first board actually burst into flames. I'm talking actual burn your house down fire. I still had my old i7 920 system running and was testing out the build with some extra hardware, so fortunately it didn't have my good stuff in it. I put a GT440 video card in it a booted up. I smelled a little burning smell, but put it off because I couldn't find the source and it went away. Later on I put a AMD 5450 in it to try out. As soon as I pushed the power button flames shot up from the PCIex slot. I quickly shut the machine down. If I didn't have the side of the case off, and I hadn't been looking right at it, this could have been worse. Upon further examination I noticed that the GT440 card didn't have have pins in all the possible spaces on the bottom of the card, this must have been what saved it. Although it does have some damage, and doesn't seem to be working quite right anymore. The AMD card is literally toast. Now keep in mind that this system had been running for a couple hours at this point.

So I go to return the board to MicroCenter. They claim that there are bent pins in the processor socket and can not exchange it. I suspect that I messed them up trying to put the cap back on it. Asus does it differently from Gigabyte so I screwed it up trying to put it on. Later I barely touched it while checking it out and bent a pin. Extremely flimsy. I haggled a little, bit the bullet and got another board. While this board didn't self destruct, I really wish it would have. It should kill itself for all the grief it has caused me. It started with the memory. I got 2 8GB sticks of 1866 ram. I could barely get it run at 1066. I was planning a RMA for the ram. I was thinking that this was the first bad set of ram I've ever had. Later I tried three other sets of known good ram, none would run at rated speed. Even the 1333 stuff. Pretty sad. I threw the 1866 ram in a Gigabyte board and it booted right up at even tighter timings then specced at.

With the system running I'm plagued by non functional USB ports, random USB drop outs with the ports that seemed to work. The occasional random crashes and stutters while playing videos have really pushed me over the edge. Theres nothing like listening to the beeps of the USB connect disconnect for hours till you think to shut off system sounds. The only reason I haven't brought this board back already is because I had finals this week and couldn't afford the distraction.

I really do apologize for the rant, but it leads up to my point. This is a server. When your building a server the only reason not to use a server board is to save money. If you've got the budget buy a server board. You seem to since your looking a boards that cost more then most Supermicro's. These boards just work. They come with two Intel NIC's, IPMI, and confirmed reliability. These boards will provide dependable service for as long as you need. I'm switching to a Gigabyte board when I return the Asus tomorrow, but even it seems to have a lot of negative comments. It just doesn't seem like like the Z77 boards are fully baked yet, maybe after a few bios updates, just not now. Don't take the chance, go with something you know will work.

I agree with you to a certain extent, but the issue is partly the OP's requirements. You can spend well over $200 on a server LGA1155 board (gaining IPMI and KVM over LAN in the process) and still not get back panel USB 3.0 support. If that's a deal-breaker for the OP, there you go.
Alecthar is offline  
post #16 of 21 Old 05-09-2012, 09:09 PM
Newbie
 
Alecthar's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Germany
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by assassin View Post

You can use a Sandy Bridge in an Ivy Bridge board and upgrade later if you want.


The Ivy boards really aren't any more expensive.

Actually, they are, if you want an Intel NIC. The P8Z77-V LE is closest in price to the P8P67 Pro, and features a Realtek NIC. If you want an Intel NIC you have to spend $200 on the P8Z77-V, which also gets you a bunch of other stuff you don't ever need in a server, like built-in wifi, that you'll end up turning off in the BIOS anyway.

Also, I try to keep buying new procs for a server to the absolute minimum, normally only doing so if the proc dies or the motherboard demands replacement with something more recent. Saving a few watts in the TDP isn't worth the money of buying an Ivy Bridge proc later on, in my opinion.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

how about the Asus Z77 WS ?

It's pretty much as bad assed as you can get on LGA1155.

Aside from that your looking at LGA2011

The Deluxe is already overkill, and the WS really isn't a server board, if server features are something the OP is really interested in.

The reality of this request is that some of the OP's desires are mutually exclusive. It's difficult to find (or at least I'm having difficulty) a genuine server board with USB 3.0 support. They simply aren't designed with loads of back panel connectivity in mind, for obvious reasons. If you're willing to go standard consumer, only Intel and the higher end boards from ASUS/MSI/Gigabyte come with Intel NICs onbard. Either connectivity is more significant than server features/reliability, or vice versa, and either way I see no reason to spend more than $200.
Alecthar is offline  
post #17 of 21 Old 05-09-2012, 09:10 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
assassin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 12,894
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 205
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alecthar View Post

Actually, they are, if you want an Intel NIC.

Or you can get a H77 board and a Intel NIC for about $115.
assassin is offline  
post #18 of 21 Old 05-09-2012, 09:16 PM
Newbie
 
Alecthar's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Germany
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by assassin View Post

Or you can get a H77 board and a Intel NIC for about $115.

I stand corrected. Intel makes an H77 board that has a PCI-E 3.0 slot and a x4 PCI-E 2.0 slot that would work perfectly.

Which one were you looking at?
Alecthar is offline  
post #19 of 21 Old 05-09-2012, 09:19 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
assassin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 12,894
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 205
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alecthar View Post

I stand corrected. Intel makes an H77 board that has a PCI-E 3.0 slot and a x4 PCI-E 2.0 slot that would work perfectly.

Which one were you looking at?

There is that option if you want onboard but you only get 4 SATA.

Or you can go with the ASRock and add an Intel NIC for about $115 total and get 8 SATA.
assassin is offline  
post #20 of 21 Old 05-09-2012, 09:27 PM
Newbie
 
Alecthar's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Germany
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by assassin View Post

There is that option if you want onboard but you only get 4 SATA.

Or you can go with the ASRock and add an Intel NIC for about $115 total and get 8 SATA.

If he wants onboard and only plans on having 20 drives max, it'll work. 2 expanders for 8 drives a piece, 16 total, plus the 4 onboard, enough for the 20 hot swap bays.

And I see yours. Roughly $30 for a PCI NIC, $85 for the board, just enough PCI-E slots to make the bays work. As long as built-in to the board doesn't matter, it's a perfect solution. The PCI bus is relatively uncluttered, and the PCI-E slots are free for the 2 expanders he'll need.
Alecthar is offline  
post #21 of 21 Old 05-09-2012, 11:00 PM
Senior Member
 
duff99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 368
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alecthar View Post

I agree with you to a certain extent, but the issue is partly the OP's requirements. You can spend well over $200 on a server LGA1155 board (gaining IPMI and KVM over LAN in the process) and still not get back panel USB 3.0 support. If that's a deal-breaker for the OP, there you go.

If he needs USB 3.0 get a add in card. You can get a 4 port card for $20. Get a Supermicro board for $170 or $200 with IPMI. It's already been mentioned that most of these boards come with features that you'll just end up turning off. The Supermicro boards just work, one of the reasons is they don't have all these extras that you don't need.

You also don't need to use a Xeon or ECC ram. So you could just use a i3 and standard desktop ram if you want. He wants a board that he can use for the next five years and not worry about it. This is it. My board has four PCI-e slots to 2 8x and 2 4x. So add a couple m1015's from ebay for cheap 6Gbps expansion. This is another thing that needs to be said. Most consumer boards expansion slots are not designed with HBA's in mind, just graphic cards. Many won't work with HBA's.

I usually don't say anything about this. Most of the time using a consumer board is to save money. In this case everyone is recommending this expensive consumer boards. In this price range it just seems to be a no brainer to go Supermicro. I guess I'm just used to hanging out on server forums. On every build suggestion thread the first recommendation is always Supermicro.

I've done both consumer and server grade builds. I built my Unraid server using a AMD 780 board, and it's worked fine. I did this because I was on a budget though. My Server 2008 system is running on a Supermicro board. If I get the itch to rebuild the Unraid box I'll definitely go Supermicro. Of course it will be virtualized running ESXi.
duff99 is offline  
Reply Home Theater Computers

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off