So what AV receiver do you have? - Page 3 - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #61 of 84 Old 05-16-2012, 01:50 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Suntan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Twin Cities
Posts: 7,103
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Liked: 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sammy2 View Post

I know we are drifting somewhat here but define "small" and "linear output well into...." It sounds like you're talking about SPL vs Frequency of the mains that doesn't dive off at too high of a frequency so there isn't a hole in the graph at the x-over frequency, yes?

Did you measure your system with a SPL meter to confirm this?

Yes. Most people either have their subs set too high to meet their mains, or they have a hole where their mains/center tapers out (distortion is more likely) before their subwoofer takes over.

Most everyone uses reference volume. But really it is whatever max volume you prefer to listen at. If you like it loud measure there. If you like it soft, you don't need as much umph.

Anyway, assuming reference volume as the reference, I'd personally want to see mains being able to run down to at least 120hz without deviating. 3db is the standard measure of "allowable" deviation, but really the ideal desire is to stay as close to reference as possible.

I haven't used my SPL meter in a long time. I use Audyssey for the setup, as well as REW for evaluating speaker and treatment placement.

-Suntan
Suntan is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #62 of 84 Old 05-16-2012, 01:52 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Sammy2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Right next to Wineville, CA
Posts: 9,805
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 96 Post(s)
Liked: 187
That's what I thought but was also thinking that the OP or others might not understand.

Sammy2 is offline  
post #63 of 84 Old 05-16-2012, 02:08 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Zon2020's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 2,716
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suntan View Post

In any case, all I said was that your opinions are fine, as long as they are kept in the context that they are just opinions. There’s more than one way to setup your AV system.

-Suntan

It's not my opinion. That's simply the way it's designed.
I'm not going to argue with you. Get rid of your center if you want. But that's not the way the soundtrack is meant to be reproduced, and the soundtrack sends 50-60% of content including all main dialogue to the center channel. I suppose you can go complain to Ray Dolby if you don't like it that way.

And if people have their subwoofer blasting away, they they don't have their system set up right.
Zon2020 is offline  
post #64 of 84 Old 05-16-2012, 02:24 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Zon2020's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 2,716
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suntan View Post

I'm not a big advocate of this myself. The mains, although not responsible for the talking when setup in a 5.1/7.1 setup, are still responsible for a lot of mid-frequency audio. They should be fully capable of providing linear output down into the high low-frequency range to get a full sounding front soundstage.


But if you're goal is to get your mains below 120hz with less than 3db of rolloff, you don't need massive or expensive mains; even little Wharfedale Diamonds or NHT Super Zeros will do that in small packages. There are a gazillion good bookshelf speakers that will accomplish that.

Personally, I have floorstanding speakers for fronts in both of my setups and set my crossovers lower. It will help clean up and ease the burden on your sub to be relieved of having to reproduce those 100hz signals.
Zon2020 is offline  
post #65 of 84 Old 05-16-2012, 02:26 PM
Senior Member
 
wyen78's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Philly, PA
Posts: 307
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by indio22 View Post

I am new to surround sound - got my first AVR a few weeks ago. I find that I generally don't like all the movie dialog coming only from the center channel speaker. With exclusive center channel dialog, the sound localization tends to come from below the screen, and sounds too narrow - particularly on films with a lot of dialog. I find having some percentage of dialog level also coming from the front L/R speakers (but with the center still handling the bulk of dialog) is preferable - at least to my ears. The triangulation of the sound seems to place the sound location as if coming directly from the screen, rather than from under it. And also this provides a wider sound stage without having the dialog decoupled from the screen. (I have tried the phantom mode that dispenses with center channel and don't like that - it does mess up the sound location. Rather what I like is maybe 80/20 or so split between center and L/R speakers.)

I realize the origin mixer may have had a certain idea from where the sound should emanate, and I am changing the original intention, but what can I say - to me it sounds better. I am sure in the recording of sounds compromises were made anyway, so I don't mind tweaking them. With that in mind, has anyone else noticed dialog pinned to the center channel speaker can at times give a narrow sound that isn't always so appealing?

While the PLII movie sound modes on my receiver do not allow for adjusting the center channel width, the PLII music modes do, so I have been playing around with them a bit, and can generally get the center/L/R dialog balance that I like. Too bad the movie modes don't offer that adjustment. With true 5.1 sound seems I am out of luck - no center width adjustment available. Since I am only using 5.1 of my 7.1 receiver capability, it would be cool if I could direct center channel sound to my currently unused two speaker outputs, place a speaker on either side of the TV (closer to the TV than my front L/R mains), and then turn the volume up enough to allow for the L/R dialog supplement. But looking at the user manual (Denon 1712), I don't find a way to utilize the extra two channels in that fashion.

you can't adjust the center mix with r/l speakers in a true 5.1 surround setup. If you could....it wouldn't be true 5.1 surround. The reason why 5.1 is called 5.1 is that each of the 6 speakers is getting a dedicated channel for audio reproduction. By mixing the r/l with center channel they are no longer getting the single independent track they are supposed to.

I prefer dolby digital, dts formats to prologic and other ones. It's not just the sound localization, the dynamic range is different and larger for dedicated 5.1 formats. Everything seems to have better clarity. I think it's better to adjust your speaker positions than to basically nerf your sound system by not allowing it to use the more advanced audio formats.

Ideally the speakers tweeters should all be at the same height (for the front soundstage). Not really possible for most people except those using acousically transparent screens with front projectors. Many people find mounting the center above the tv and tilting it down gives them the best results. But I'm lazy and rent and don't want to mount stuff so I have my center below the screen and tilt it up slightly so the tweeters should hit my ears. I also find increasing the level of the center, with respect to the left and right speakers, to be helpful especially since many mixes are meant to be played at reference level which is way too loud for me.

wyen78 is offline  
post #66 of 84 Old 05-16-2012, 02:39 PM
Senior Member
 
wyen78's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Philly, PA
Posts: 307
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Afroteddy View Post

Been spending some time in the audio threads lately trying to learn about receivers and I am completely overwhelmed! Had never heard of Audessy or height speaker placement until now. Also didn't know that upscale and upconversion were two different things.

In my price range the receivers all have "get this, lose this" feature set.

So, what do you guys have? From an HTPC users standpoint(TV, blu-ray,streaming), what should I be looking for in a receiver?

I use an onkyo 709.

Many HT enthusiasts upgrade constantly so you can usually find used equipment. You can use component cables and fiber optic to get HD video and DD/DTS 5.1. (though hdmi makes cabling cleaner....it does have it's own downsides too).

Find a receiver that has the inputs you need and the sound formats you need.

If you tell us what your price point is we can give recommendations. Both my current and my last receiver were refurbished units and both worked fine. Check out accessories4less, they sell refurb units and are authorized dealers for onkyo, denon along with other brands....that way you still get a warranty. if you buy refurb from a non authorized dealer you won't get a warranty.

At any rate, this won't really do much for your standard def video. 480i is simply tough to look at if you have gotten used to 720p, 1080i or 1080p. A cheaper receiver...even mid range probably isn't going to make the picutre look any better. To really make a difference, you'd probably have to get a dedicated video processor which are really for high end home theaters due to the price.

The biggest difference for picture quality is to use high def sources. Blu ray on a budget hd tv is still going to look better than SD on a highend tv.

wyen78 is offline  
post #67 of 84 Old 05-16-2012, 02:46 PM
Senior Member
 
indio22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Chicagoland area
Posts: 396
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sammy2 View Post

The networked models allow you go connect via iPhone or android (3rd party but Denon app comming soon) to trim all channels SPL to your liking. I'm not sure, but you should be able to adjust the channel output in the 1712 using the GUI (See page 62 --> 43 of your manual).

I can adjust the SPL of each speaker independently on my 1712. But unless I am in the PLII "music" mode, I can't adjust the amount of center channel sound (mostly dialog) that bleeds from the center channel into the front R/L channels. For example, if I increase the SPL of the front L/R channels relative to the center channel, that doesn't really buy me any increase in hearing dialog from L/R channels - because there is little if any there to begin with.

The PLII "music" mode I mentioned, has a particular "center channel width" setting that incrementally allows the user to expand the center channel sound into the front R/L channels. The user can go from keeping all center channel sound on the center speaker, to having the center speaker share equally with the front L/R speaker, or anything in between. So the listener can in effect control how much dialog is heard from the L/R speakers relative to the center channel. I am not sure why this setting is not offered on the PLII "movie" modes or with the other dedicated 5.1 modes.
indio22 is offline  
post #68 of 84 Old 05-16-2012, 03:05 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Zon2020's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 2,716
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by indio22 View Post

I am not sure why this setting is not offered on the PLII "movie" modes or with the other dedicated 5.1 modes.

Putting aside concert DVDs and BDs, music generally isn't recorded with a center channel at all, and many music modes don't even use the center channel (and for others that do it's synthetic). But DD 5.1 and the HD formats purposely assign certain content to the center channel. If you asked the mfgs why you can't change it, they'd probably ask you why you'd want to.

As far as I'm concerned, people can set up their system any way they want and however makes them happy. But logically, considering how those protocols are designed, there's really no reason for them to offer the adjustments you would like to have.

I wonder if you could do that in your HTPC and then run analog signals to the multichannel inputs of your AVR. I don't know if there's any software that would enable you to remix the audio the way you would prefer to do it or not. Might be a situation where an HTPC would provide you the flexibility you seek. Since I've never thought before of doing this, I have no idea if it's possible. Wouldn't surprise me though if it is.
Zon2020 is offline  
post #69 of 84 Old 05-16-2012, 03:10 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Sammy2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Right next to Wineville, CA
Posts: 9,805
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 96 Post(s)
Liked: 187
Maybe in control panel > Sound.

Sammy2 is offline  
post #70 of 84 Old 05-16-2012, 03:26 PM
Senior Member
 
indio22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Chicagoland area
Posts: 396
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by wyen78 View Post

you can't adjust the center mix with r/l speakers in a true 5.1 surround setup. If you could....it wouldn't be true 5.1 surround. The reason why 5.1 is called 5.1 is that each of the 6 speakers is getting a dedicated channel for audio reproduction. By mixing the r/l with center channel they are no longer getting the single independent track they are supposed to.

I prefer dolby digital, dts formats to prologic and other ones. It's not just the sound localization, the dynamic range is different and larger for dedicated 5.1 formats. Everything seems to have better clarity. I think it's better to adjust your speaker positions than to basically nerf your sound system by not allowing it to use the more advanced audio formats.

Ideally the speakers tweeters should all be at the same height (for the front soundstage). Not really possible for most people except those using acousically transparent screens with front projectors. Many people find mounting the center above the tv and tilting it down gives them the best results. But I'm lazy and rent and don't want to mount stuff so I have my center below the screen and tilt it up slightly so the tweeters should hit my ears. I also find increasing the level of the center, with respect to the left and right speakers, to be helpful especially since many mixes are meant to be played at reference level which is way too loud for me.

My center and front L/R speakers are all the same. The center channel speaker is located fairly close under the TV, and tilted up slightly. Given that setup, when watching Master And Commander in 5.1 channel sound, when Russell Crow is speaking, he is speaking from just under my TV, lol. Now if I play a stereo source movie that allows use of the PLII (matrix 5.1) music mode, I can adjust the center channel width incrementally, so that for example some portion of Russell Crowes dialog comes also from the front L/R speakers and not just the center, at my discretion. When done reasonably (maybe 80/20 split C/LR), I find this opens up the sound stage, keeps the dialog located on the screen, but actually has the effect of raising it up some - as if the dialog is emanating directly from Russell Crowes head.

I don't think there is any technical obstacle that would prevent post-mixing a portion of the center channel into the front R/L channels - if the tech persons chose to include that functionality. Should it be done? While the original material may have placed all dialog on the center channel, in my opinion the overall goal should be the best listening experience in the home theater, not necessarily strict adherence to the original mix. Given how sound emanates in nature, aren't three speakers a bit of a compromise anyway? Also consider that displays are only getting larger. I am not convinced pinning all dialog to one center channel speaker located at one side of the screen necessarily provides the best result. But otherwise I agree, watching a film such as "Master And Commander" in 5.1 with cannon balls flying all over and feeling like you are in the creaking ship is a lot of fun.
indio22 is offline  
post #71 of 84 Old 05-16-2012, 08:04 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Suntan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Twin Cities
Posts: 7,103
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Liked: 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zon2020 View Post

It's not my opinion. That's simply the way it's designed.

I suppose you can go complain to Ray Dolby if you don't like it that way.

Actually, if you go to the dolby consumer website, you'll see that they do recommend setting the center above or below the screen and little else. If you dig into their advanced guides for setting up a proper mixing studio though, Dolby Labs goes on at length about having the center speaker properly located in line with respect to the mains for a proper soundstage. Basically what they are telling consumers is that it is ok to put the center speaker wherever you want it, as long as you look for and trust the DD symbol on the disc cover. What they tell the theaters and mixing studios is altogether different.

One interesting note though, in regards to the mixing studios, Dolby Labs freely acknowledge that the mixing engineer can use a smaller center speaker. In fact, the SDU4 mixing decoder supports redirecting of the lower mid-range frequencies to the mains during in studio playback of the DD mixed track. Not exactly in line with the notion of running a prominent center speaker and then cheapening out on small mains to put next to it.

Further, you will see similar recommendations in the SMPTE and THX theater guidlines if you want to pay for the publications. I believe SMPTE 202M covers speaker setup and frequency response requirements.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zon2020 View Post

I'm not going to argue with you. Get rid of your center if you want. But that's not the way the soundtrack is meant to be reproduced, and the soundtrack sends 50-60% of content including all main dialogue to the center channel.

I did a long time ago. Having robust mains aligned and properly positioned relative to the seated listener offers significantly better overall imaging. Along with it dialog is better locked to the screen compared to having a center channel speaker located poorly to the top or bottom of the screen.

At least that has been my experience in my basement.

You seem to be of the single mind that a center channel speaker improves everything all the time. The center speaker was added as a crutch to improve localization to the screen when the listener is sitting off axis. If you are sitting in the sweet spot (which most enthusiasts would tend to do) at best it does no harm. If improperly positioned out of alignment from the mains, it can actually be detrimental.

Any AVR of even average capability can redirect the audio from the center channel to the two mains. If either of your center channels is misplaced above or below your screen, and you tend to sit on axis to the screen, I would encourage you to try it. You might be surprised by the improvement.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zon2020 View Post

But if you're goal is to get your mains below 120hz with less than 3db of rolloff, you don't need massive or expensive mains; even little Wharfedale Diamonds or NHT Super Zeros will do that in small packages. There are a gazillion good bookshelf speakers that will accomplish that.

Ah, but you're looking at the manufacturers specs...

At best you're going to get references to DIN 45 500, or the measurement of the speaker running in the near field with the test mic at one meter from the woofer. This is fine if you are sitting with your head 3 feet from your speakers in a small room. I'm talking about having the ability to properly drive down without distortion while filling a fair sized room and sitting a proper distance from the speakers.

Put that little speaker you cited, the one with the 4" woofer, in a decent sized room and see if you can actually maintain reference levels down to 120 hz without distortion. I'll bet you a coke it can't come close.

Further, I believe I did say at I'd want to see a flat response down to 120... ...as a minimum.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zon2020 View Post

Personally, I have floorstanding speakers for fronts in both of my setups and set my crossovers lower.

Ah, so in writing you recommend that other people could buy a good center and then get away with compact mains, but in action you acknowledge that you run larger mains because it benefits you.

So it's a case of, "Do as I say, not as I do?"

-Suntan
Suntan is offline  
post #72 of 84 Old 05-16-2012, 08:06 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Suntan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Twin Cities
Posts: 7,103
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Liked: 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by indio22 View Post

My center and front L/R speakers are all the same. The center channel speaker is located fairly close under the TV, and tilted up slightly. Given that setup, when watching Master And Commander in 5.1 channel sound, when Russell Crow is speaking, he is speaking from just under my TV, lol.

Imagine that!

-Suntan
Suntan is offline  
post #73 of 84 Old 05-17-2012, 01:47 PM
Senior Member
 
wyen78's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Philly, PA
Posts: 307
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by indio22 View Post

My center and front L/R speakers are all the same. The center channel speaker is located fairly close under the TV, and tilted up slightly. Given that setup, when watching Master And Commander in 5.1 channel sound, when Russell Crow is speaking, he is speaking from just under my TV, lol. Now if I play a stereo source movie that allows use of the PLII (matrix 5.1) music mode, I can adjust the center channel width incrementally, so that for example some portion of Russell Crowes dialog comes also from the front L/R speakers and not just the center, at my discretion. When done reasonably (maybe 80/20 split C/LR), I find this opens up the sound stage, keeps the dialog located on the screen, but actually has the effect of raising it up some - as if the dialog is emanating directly from Russell Crowes head.

I don't think there is any technical obstacle that would prevent post-mixing a portion of the center channel into the front R/L channels - if the tech persons chose to include that functionality. Should it be done? While the original material may have placed all dialog on the center channel, in my opinion the overall goal should be the best listening experience in the home theater, not necessarily strict adherence to the original mix. Given how sound emanates in nature, aren't three speakers a bit of a compromise anyway? Also consider that displays are only getting larger. I am not convinced pinning all dialog to one center channel speaker located at one side of the screen necessarily provides the best result. But otherwise I agree, watching a film such as "Master And Commander" in 5.1 with cannon balls flying all over and feeling like you are in the creaking ship is a lot of fun.

Whether you post mix or pre mix, the end effect is that it is not true 5.1 which is why Dolby and DTS wouldn't want to let you do that. Any mixing of channels is not allowed for these formats. The people at Dolby don't want you to walk into a showroom and listen to a Dolby system that has screwed up settings, they don't want you to walk away thinking...Dolby sucks when in reality someone with no idea what they are doing was playing with the settings.

You are right in that the only thing that matters is your own ears. But the people who engineered DD and DTS have certain specs to maintain. Prologic is Dolby's solution to do what you are trying to do.

wyen78 is offline  
post #74 of 84 Old 05-17-2012, 04:05 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Zon2020's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 2,716
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suntan View Post

Ah, so in writing you recommend that other people could buy a good center and then get away with compact mains, but in action you acknowledge that you run larger mains because it benefits you.

So it's a case of, "Do as I say, not as I do?"

-Suntan

Wrong again. I listen to a lot of music, and I generally listen to that in straight unprocessed stereo. I don't use fake "concert hall" reverb, or synthesized fake surround modes. I listen to it as it was recorded. Thus my mains are very important to me for music. If all I used them for was video, I'd probably have much smaller cheaper front speakers. Also, where they are located I prefer floor standing to having bookshelf speakers on stands. No, putting them in bookshelves or in a console is not an option; if I used bookshelf speakers - even small ones like Super Zeros - they'd be on good stands by themselves, and they'd take up just as much space as the floorstanding ones.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wyen78 View Post

Whether you post mix or pre mix, the end effect is that it is not true 5.1 which is why Dolby and DTS wouldn't want to let you do that. Any mixing of channels is not allowed for these formats. The people at Dolby don't want you to walk into a showroom and listen to a Dolby system that has screwed up settings, they don't want you to walk away thinking...Dolby sucks when in reality someone with no idea what they are doing was playing with the settings.

You are right in that the only thing that matters is your own ears. But the people who engineered DD and DTS have certain specs to maintain. Prologic is Dolby's solution to do what you are trying to do.

+1

You can either listen to six discrete channels the way the producer and director intended by faithfully reproducing the soundtrack the way it is recorded on the disk, or you can have your AVR synthesize its own fake soundstage.

If people don't position and balance their speakers correctly that's a different problem, but the solution to that isn't "oh I think I'll just leave out a speaker and channel or two", it's to fix the position and balance.

But in the end, whatever floats your boat.
Zon2020 is offline  
post #75 of 84 Old 05-17-2012, 04:06 PM
Senior Member
 
mo0sic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 223
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 15
Denon 4311ci with 9.2. Audssey xt32 is amazing. I used to have an older denon 889. 5.1 is a joke now.
mo0sic is offline  
post #76 of 84 Old 05-17-2012, 04:16 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Zon2020's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 2,716
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by mo0sic View Post

Denon 4311ci with 9.2. Audssey xt32 is amazing. I used to have an older denon 889. 5.1 is a joke now.

Of course there is no 9.1 or 9.2 content, but if you like adding additional matrixed channels, have at it. Most stuff isn't even recorded in 7.1 yet.

How big is your room? And what are you using for your six surround speakers?

You can use xt32 with 5.1 too.
Zon2020 is offline  
post #77 of 84 Old 05-17-2012, 08:39 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Suntan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Twin Cities
Posts: 7,103
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Liked: 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zon2020 View Post

You can either listen to six discrete channels the way the producer and director intended by faithfully reproducing the soundtrack the way it is recorded on the disk...

I always love to see these blind dogma proclamations about one specific criteria for playback. This notion that if you do this one thing then you are assured to get faithful reproduction of the material the way the director intended. It's a joke. It's a good rebuttal in a forum, but it's still a joke.

Zon, let's see the waterfall plots and the RT60 graphs for your listening room. I'm sure those meet SMPTE and THX recommendations don't they? What, they don't? Well, surely that is part of what the director expects from you when you watch his movie isn't it?

Surely your display is outputting the SMPTE/THX recommended 16 foot lamberts right? Your seating position is within the SMPTE recommended 30 to 70 degree viewing angles right?

Oh, but you've got 6 speakers?... ...well nevermind. That makes up for everything else.

Yeah, the reality is that *very few* home setups even come close to meeting the industry recommended criteria for properly reproducing the material the way the director desires it to be experienced. Honestly, for a large majority of the home setups I've seen around here, the number of speakers used isn't even close to being the biggest impediment.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zon2020 View Post

But in the end, whatever floats your boat.

Now you're starting to get it! Yes. The homeowner should be pragmatic and setup their system in a way that suits them best. If that means PL processing, or yes, even the misplaced notion of spending most of their money on a center speaker and sub while neglecting the other components needed to generate a proper soundstage, if it makes them happy, so be it.

Let's just keep the "recommended" suggestions at that. Suggestions.

-Suntan
Suntan is offline  
post #78 of 84 Old 05-19-2012, 08:41 PM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Afroteddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 247
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Well after lots of soul searching and gas burning I finally settled on a Pioneer vsx-1021. It seemed to be the most well rounded in my price range. Probably would have preferred the Yamaha 671 but they aren't going down in price around here.
Afroteddy is offline  
post #79 of 84 Old 05-20-2012, 02:01 PM
Member
 
BudgetHT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 108
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I use an Onkyo HT RC-180. It's been a great receiver for the last couple years. I don't do 3D so I've never had a reason to move to a different unit.
BudgetHT is offline  
post #80 of 84 Old 05-21-2012, 09:15 AM
Senior Member
 
wyen78's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Philly, PA
Posts: 307
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Afroteddy View Post

Well after lots of soul searching and gas burning I finally settled on a Pioneer vsx-1021. It seemed to be the most well rounded in my price range. Probably would have preferred the Yamaha 671 but they aren't going down in price around here.

How much are you paying for that receiver? People here might be able to point you towards some good deals if we knew what your price range was.

wyen78 is offline  
post #81 of 84 Old 05-21-2012, 03:42 PM
Member
 
Bryceo's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 126
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I have 2 of them a sansui surround reciver 6 channels just
For effects and a Yamaha reciver for my mains and sub
Bryceo is offline  
post #82 of 84 Old 05-21-2012, 06:58 PM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Afroteddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 247
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by wyen78 View Post


How much are you paying for that receiver? People here might be able to point you towards some good deals if we knew what your price range was.

Around $250.
Afroteddy is offline  
post #83 of 84 Old 05-21-2012, 07:15 PM
Member
 
Bryceo's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 126
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Afroteddy View Post

Around $250.

I'm from Australia so $250 won't get you verey far down hear
Bryceo is offline  
post #84 of 84 Old 05-21-2012, 08:18 PM
Member
 
seang86s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 88
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Anthem Statement D2v and a Sunfire Cinema Grand 7 channel amp. 7 Definitive Technology Mythos speakers and a Velodyne Digital Drive 12 inch subwoofer. Video displays is a Panasonic VT30 65 inch plasma and a Panasonic PT-AE7000U projector.

HTPC is a Z68 based system using the onboard Intel video to drive the Statement D2v.
seang86s is offline  
Reply Home Theater Computers

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off