Need some help understanding HTPC volume when playing music. - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 3 Old 10-04-2012, 10:30 PM - Thread Starter
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I understand volume within movies. 105db peaks, 115db for lfe channel, possibly a bit higher going to sub if bass management sends a lot over from the other channels.

However, my confusion comes from playing music with programs such as Media Monkey.
Or from playing video games.
What is peak SPL that music and video games and such can produce?
What about using volume leveling? etc..

I am using WASAPI through HDMI out of an Nvidia card to my AVR.
Is there any max volume when using WASAPI?


Hopefully my thoughts at least are being gotten across. Don't really know the correct way to phrase my question.

Basically if I know my speakers can handle movie reference volume and would like to prevent anything from sending volume any louder than that.

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post #2 of 3 Old 10-06-2012, 01:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shinyav View Post

I understand volume within movies. 105db peaks, 115db for lfe channel, possibly a bit higher going to sub if bass management sends a lot over from the other channels.
However, my confusion comes from playing music with programs such as Media Monkey.
Or from playing video games.
What is peak SPL that music and video games and such can produce?
What about using volume leveling? etc..
I am using WASAPI through HDMI out of an Nvidia card to my AVR.
Is there any max volume when using WASAPI?
Hopefully my thoughts at least are being gotten across. Don't really know the correct way to phrase my question.
Basically if I know my speakers can handle movie reference volume and would like to prevent anything from sending volume any louder than that.
  1. SPL is the difference between ambient atmospheric pressure and the pressure created by the sound wave. It is completely unique to your environment. You will need to do a measurement in your viewing/listening area.
  2. Max volume using WASAPI will be determined by the your external amplifier and speakers. Volume setting, clipping, db ratings of components, etc.
  3. There is no "peak SPL" that music and video games can produce. Someone tomorrow could "turn the gain up to 11" on the next CD/game.
  4. WASAPI will produce the gain that was set in the recording.
  5. If you don't want to blow your speakers, turn them down before starting playback and then turn them up to a comfortable listening level. Most music/video game gain levels will be much higher than the channels in a movie's surround sound track.
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post #3 of 3 Old 10-06-2012, 09:40 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vladd View Post

  1. SPL is the difference between ambient atmospheric pressure and the pressure created by the sound wave. It is completely unique to your environment. You will need to do a measurement in your viewing/listening area.
    Yes, I guess SPL isnt the word. Maximum amplitude I guess. With calibrated speakers that is the most the audio track on a movie will ask of them.
  2. Max volume using WASAPI will be determined by the your external amplifier and speakers. Volume setting, clipping, db ratings of components, etc.
    Yes but I am wondering if WASAPI puts a cap of -0 dbfs etc.
  3. There is no "peak SPL" that music and video games can produce. Someone tomorrow could "turn the gain up to 11" on the next CD/game.
  4. WASAPI will produce the gain that was set in the recording.
    I am wondering if anywhere along the signal chain there is any type of hard limit.
  5. If you don't want to blow your speakers, turn them down before starting playback and then turn them up to a comfortable listening level. Most music/video game gain levels will be much higher than the channels in a movie's surround sound track.
I agree but I could record a track of some music that averages -20dbfs and then all of a sudden send a signal over 0dbfs.
Or if I calibrate my speakers to all be able to handle 0dbfs then I am always within safe limits.

Thanks

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