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post #1 of 17 Old 11-29-2012, 01:20 PM - Thread Starter
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I have two HTPC's connected wifi to my router, I can't watch recorded HD shows over the wifi network even with 300n. I have two powerline internet adapters that aren't available anymore, so I can't buy a third. Is there a way two hook the two HTPC's directly to each other with the powerline adapters and still have both of them connect wifi to the router?
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post #2 of 17 Old 11-29-2012, 07:55 PM
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You can by setting up static IP's on the NIC's in the two HTPC's using the powerline adapters to have them talk directly to one another on their own private network. Do not use a gateway when setting up these connections and traffic will be limited to the two computers. Internet traffic will be forced to use the wifi connection to the wireless router which you most likely already have setup properly using DHCP and dont need to modify.

Although its great to do this to save money, I think you would save yourself some headache and have a faster more reliable connection if you just got some more modern powerline adapters (if thats your preferred way of networking your house) and run powerline connections from both HTPC's directly to the router.

I have been able to stream 1080p on my wireless n setup but it all depends on your hardware and signal strength. A few things have to be in alignment for it to work, namely good hardware in the PC's and on the wireless access point / router as well as not too many obstacles like walls for the signal to pass through. One 1080p file could have a higher bitrate as well making it hangup or just not play while a lower bitrate file might play just fine.
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post #3 of 17 Old 11-30-2012, 06:50 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by vullcan View Post

You can by setting up static IP's on the NIC's in the two HTPC's using the powerline adapters to have them talk directly to one another on their own private network. Do not use a gateway when setting up these connections and traffic will be limited to the two computers. Internet traffic will be forced to use the wifi connection to the wireless router which you most likely already have setup properly using DHCP and dont need to modify.
Although its great to do this to save money, I think you would save yourself some headache and have a faster more reliable connection if you just got some more modern powerline adapters (if thats your preferred way of networking your house) and run powerline connections from both HTPC's directly to the router.
I have been able to stream 1080p on my wireless n setup but it all depends on your hardware and signal strength. A few things have to be in alignment for it to work, namely good hardware in the PC's and on the wireless access point / router as well as not too many obstacles like walls for the signal to pass through. One 1080p file could have a higher bitrate as well making it hangup or just not play while a lower bitrate file might play just fine.

The video I'm trying to stream is basically just recorded TV through WMC. I guess I could try turning down the recording quality a smidge. It seems to be pretty close to being able to play now, just needs a little boost.
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post #4 of 17 Old 11-30-2012, 09:53 PM
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I just got a netgear R6300 router and A6200 adapter. It will supposedly do Multiple HD Streaming.
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post #5 of 17 Old 12-01-2012, 09:33 AM
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you should be able to stream video over WiFI. I do it on my network with HD all the time. I haven't tried doing multiple streams from WMC, but I have watched DVR shows over my network.

Sounds like your network is not setup fully correct. I suggest making sure you setup homegroup, share your recorded TV folder, and update your drivers.

It's possible your machine that holds recordings isn't powerful enough, but if you're going WMC to WMC, there shouldn't be transcoding, thus not too powerful for a direct file transfer. Have you tried watching the DVR show on that machine that recorded it to make sure it's not the recording?

You may also want to check on radio interference. I find that WMC over WiFI tends to be more sensitive to radio interference. It does use more bandwidth. This is true for both live and DVR.
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post #6 of 17 Old 12-01-2012, 09:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffkro View Post

I have two HTPC's connected wifi to my router, I can't watch recorded HD shows over the wifi network even with 300n. I have two powerline internet adapters that aren't available anymore, so I can't buy a third. Is there a way two hook the two HTPC's directly to each other with the powerline adapters and still have both of them connect wifi to the router?

As long as your adapters meet the HomePlug AV standards, you can mix and match. Early Powerline Ethernet adapters could not be mixed but today's models can. If I were you, I'd just stick with Powerline and forego wireless. Even if you have to buy new adapters. They aren't expensive these days. As for connecting the two with the adapters while connecting to wifi, that will probably not work. The two computers will simply use the wifi network to connect to one another and ignore the adapters as they are endpoints and require traffic direction from a router/switch.
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post #7 of 17 Old 12-01-2012, 04:18 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by LexInVA View Post

As long as your adapters meet the HomePlug AV standards, you can mix and match. Early Powerline Ethernet adapters could not be mixed but today's models can. If I were you, I'd just stick with Powerline and forego wireless. Even if you have to buy new adapters. They aren't expensive these days. As for connecting the two with the adapters while connecting to wifi, that will probably not work. The two computers will simply use the wifi network to connect to one another and ignore the adapters as they are endpoints and require traffic direction from a router/switch.

Huh, I didn't know you can mix and match, my adapter are probably from about 2005-6. Are these early adpaters?
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post #8 of 17 Old 12-01-2012, 04:21 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by lovekeiiy View Post

you should be able to stream video over WiFI. I do it on my network with HD all the time. I haven't tried doing multiple streams from WMC, but I have watched DVR shows over my network.
Sounds like your network is not setup fully correct. I suggest making sure you setup homegroup, share your recorded TV folder, and update your drivers.
It's possible your machine that holds recordings isn't powerful enough, but if you're going WMC to WMC, there shouldn't be transcoding, thus not too powerful for a direct file transfer. Have you tried watching the DVR show on that machine that recorded it to make sure it's not the recording?
You may also want to check on radio interference. I find that WMC over WiFI tends to be more sensitive to radio interference. It does use more bandwidth. This is true for both live and DVR.

My "server/DVR" is a zacate E350 with 2 gigs of ram, its not exactly the most powerful cpu in the world. Its possible that its the weekest link I guess, anybody else using zacate as a server.
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post #9 of 17 Old 12-01-2012, 10:45 PM
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I use a Cisco dual band USB dongle for my single Wifi connected HTPC and it can play any content fine. The access point is a Netgear WNDR3700 dual band router.

Bear in mind that the standard N takes 20Mhz bandwidth which spans over 4 channels, std 5.5Mhz channel spacing. Some pre-N equipment allows 40Mhz bandwidth. This essentially means only channel 1, 6, 11 are useful. So you have to check your neighbor's channel setting and how strong they are then decide to use which channel. Most default setting are set at channel 6 and many owners leave routers at default setting. Then it may be better to change to channel 1 or 11.

The dipole antennae on a router has a donut shaped signal pattern. So you may need to tilt the antennae for improved coverage if the HTPC is not on the same floor. Some routers use patch antenna. Make sure there are no barriers near each or 2.4Ghz house phone in between the router and dongle.
I had to get around that gray metal post to the left by moving the black USB dongle to improve reception.
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post #10 of 17 Old 12-02-2012, 08:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LexInVA View Post

As for connecting the two with the adapters while connecting to wifi, that will probably not work. The two computers will simply use the wifi network to connect to one another and ignore the adapters as they are endpoints and require traffic direction from a router/switch.

This is incorrect. You can multihome devices without a problem. As long as you do not have a default gateway setup on both adapters, everything will work fine.
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post #11 of 17 Old 12-02-2012, 12:10 PM
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Originally Posted by jeffkro View Post

My "server/DVR" is a zacate E350 with 2 gigs of ram, its not exactly the most powerful cpu in the world. Its possible that its the weekest link I guess, anybody else using zacate as a server.

I'm not familiar with that machine. I'm not up on PC hardware anymore. I don't use a powerful machine either; late 2009 mac mini (2.66ghz D2C, 4GB RAM( running Win7. It doesn't take a lot power to trust stream a file over a network. If it has to transcode, then this is where you need more power in the CPU and RAM. I'm assuming you're talking about using WMC to another PC or extender using WMC, there shouldn't be any transcoding needed.

Personally, I think it's just your WiFi network. You probably have some radio interference. Do you have issues when watching live TV on WMC on that machine? If so, I would lean more towards my guess. If not, then it may be your recording. IF you can, try playing the file on your DVR machine, or transfer the file and play it on your HTPC. I've had bad recordings; network issues.

As for your using both powerline and WiFi, yes it's probably possible. I'm not sure if will work for you. In my experience of using WiFi and ehternet cable for LAN connections, the PC will pick one as priority, which in my case tends to WiFi. If my radio interference guess is correct, you'll probably still have the issue with DVR not playing well.

Lastly, I think your powerline adapters predate HomePlug AV standards.
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post #12 of 17 Old 12-02-2012, 01:05 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by lovekeiiy View Post

I'm not familiar with that machine. I'm not up on PC hardware anymore. I don't use a powerful machine either; late 2009 mac mini (2.66ghz D2C, 4GB RAM( running Win7. It doesn't take a lot power to trust stream a file over a network. If it has to transcode, then this is where you need more power in the CPU and RAM. I'm assuming you're talking about using WMC to another PC or extender using WMC, there shouldn't be any transcoding needed.
Personally, I think it's just your WiFi network. You probably have some radio interference. Do you have issues when watching live TV on WMC on that machine? If so, I would lean more towards my guess. If not, then it may be your recording. IF you can, try playing the file on your DVR machine, or transfer the file and play it on your HTPC. I've had bad recordings; network issues.
As for your using both powerline and WiFi, yes it's probably possible. I'm not sure if will work for you. In my experience of using WiFi and ehternet cable for LAN connections, the PC will pick one as priority, which in my case tends to WiFi. If my radio interference guess is correct, you'll probably still have the issue with DVR not playing well.
Lastly, I think your powerline adapters predate HomePlug AV standards.

That macmini will run circles around a zacate E350. I wouldn't have thought it would be to cpu intensive to serve up content to one other computer though. I wasn't using WMC to stream content, I just changed the network share settings to allow me to browse and play content from the NAS on my HTPC.
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post #13 of 17 Old 12-02-2012, 06:41 PM - Thread Starter
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Huh, my powerline kit is only rated at 85mbps, its more consistent than wifi though, wonder if its enough.
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post #14 of 17 Old 12-03-2012, 11:12 AM
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85mpbs should be sufficient for some content sharing. Even if you're only getting half that speed, 42.5mbps, that's still over 25mpbs bitrate for HD 1080p BR. This assume there isn't a lot of traffic on your network.

Unless there is transcoding, you don't need much power to transfer a file, and let the other machine play it.

I have an issue on my HTPC with is stuttering. But mine is completely the fault of bad drivers for Windows 8 with the NIC. On Windows 7, that same machine, no issues. I've played the same file through WMC to WMC, WMC to Plex, Media Player directly from the shared drive, and so forth. In my setup, the machine that does the DVR is wired to the network, and my HTPC is WiFI.

I still say to check your recording. It's one variable that should be easily eliminated. Bad recordings can look like network issues. They can also be the caused by them too, which could mean you're looking at the wrong machine to diagnose.
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post #15 of 17 Old 12-03-2012, 01:23 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovekeiiy View Post

85mpbs should be sufficient for some content sharing. Even if you're only getting half that speed, 42.5mbps, that's still over 25mpbs bitrate for HD 1080p BR. This assume there isn't a lot of traffic on your network.
Unless there is transcoding, you don't need much power to transfer a file, and let the other machine play it.
I have an issue on my HTPC with is stuttering. But mine is completely the fault of bad drivers for Windows 8 with the NIC. On Windows 7, that same machine, no issues. I've played the same file through WMC to WMC, WMC to Plex, Media Player directly from the shared drive, and so forth. In my setup, the machine that does the DVR is wired to the network, and my HTPC is WiFI.
I still say to check your recording. It's one variable that should be easily eliminated. Bad recordings can look like network issues. They can also be the caused by them too, which could mean you're looking at the wrong machine to diagnose.

I did a quick experiment temporarilly using my gaming rig as an NAS for recorded TV that I streamed wifi to my HTPC, it worked fine with no stuttering. So I guess this means the problem is either tied into my NAS or the wifi connection to the NAS. The router and my NAS are much further apart than it is to my HTPC.
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post #16 of 17 Old 12-04-2012, 03:09 AM
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Well, at least you narrowed it down some. Small victories are nice.

Is your NAS tied into your system using WiFi? One thing you could try, is possible, try to move MAS and HTPC closer to the router and see what happens. There's definitely a possiblity you're getting radio interference. And all kinds of electronics can give it too; not just stuff that is wireless. In the kitchen, microwaves are like a level three tornado. Refrigerators give out, but they're usually like a small breeze. I had this issue one time with a VOIP adapter. It has zero WFi build into it. But is installed and setup about a foot from my wireless access points. This is what my LAN looked like at the time. It's the small gray box in the middle hanging upside down.

My router had done out (the PC to the right) and had to do temp setup. When I got the router fixed, and reset everything back up, the wreless access point closest to VOIP wouldn't connect to anything wirelessly. I found if I moved it, things would connect wirelessly, which lead to this setup:

Notice the VOIP is the far left. It was as far as I could get the ethernet cable to reach. It worked, kind of. the WiFi devices that access point,would loose their connection. What it end up being? It was the having the DHCP on in the VOIP adapter. I had used the VOIP as a router during the temp LAN setup. Apparently, whatever hardware in the VOIP adapter that the DHCP uses gave off enough radio interference to make at least one of my wireless access points completely useless. It only took me about a week with help of people way more knowledgeable about network to figure that out, and I stumble and guess on the solution.

If possible, try to eliminate everything you can hardware wise before trying to tackle the radio interference issue. There are just all kinds of variables that come into play, and unfortunately, not all of them may be obvious. But hey, you get, maybe, an interesting story with crazy pictures. Don't worry, my LAN setup is still just as nutty.

click the pic for a really big pic of it.

On a side note, this is what my office before I did all that. I started the clean up process around August 2007
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post #17 of 17 Old 12-04-2012, 03:09 AM
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Well, at least you narrowed it down some. Small victories are nice.

Is your NAS tied into your system using WiFi? One thing you could try, is possible, try to move MAS and HTPC closer to the router and see what happens. There's definitely a possiblity you're getting radio interference. And all kinds of electronics can give it too; not just stuff that is wireless. In the kitchen, microwaves are like a level three tornado. Refrigerators give out, but they're usually like a small breeze. I had this issue one time with a VOIP adapter. It has zero WFi build into it. But is installed and setup about a foot from my wireless access points. This is what my LAN looked like at the time. It's the small gray box in the middle hanging upside down.

My router had done out (the PC to the right) and had to do temp setup. When I got the router fixed, and reset everything back up, the wreless access point closest to VOIP wouldn't connect to anything wirelessly. I found if I moved it, things would connect wirelessly, which lead to this setup:

Notice the VOIP is the far left. It was as far as I could get the ethernet cable to reach. It worked, kind of. the WiFi devices that access point,would loose their connection. What it end up being? It was the having the DHCP on in the VOIP adapter. I had used the VOIP as a router during the temp LAN setup. Apparently, whatever hardware in the VOIP adapter that the DHCP uses gave off enough radio interference to make at least one of my wireless access points completely useless. It only took me about a week with help of people way more knowledgeable about network to figure that out, and I stumble and guess on the solution.

If possible, try to eliminate everything you can hardware wise before trying to tackle the radio interference issue. There are just all kinds of variables that come into play, and unfortunately, not all of them may be obvious. But hey, you get, maybe, an interesting story with crazy pictures. Don't worry, my LAN setup is still just as nutty.

click the pic for a really big pic of it.

On a side note, this is what my office before I did all that. I started the clean up process around August 2007
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