Successfully overclocking an HDTV to 120 Hz native refresh from a HTPC - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 12 Old 02-20-2013, 02:44 PM - Thread Starter
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Some HDTV's can be 'overclocked' with native 120 Hz HTPC signal.

For example, the Vizio e3d420vx HDTV can successfully display native 120 Hz PC signal through the refesh rate overclock method. You need to use an EDID override INF file (like those found on 3D Vision Blog, google "EDID Override"), or use PowerStrip to force 120 Hz. Unfortunately, PowerStrip stopped working on some newer graphics cards, so we need to use the EDID override method. There's a post covering some experience overclocking 120Hz.

Try it out on your HDTV. It probably won't work, probably less than 25% of HDTV's will function with native 120 Hz through the refresh rate overclock method. Some HDTV's inadvertently support the dotclocks necessary because active shutter 3D @ 60Hz can have the same dotclock frequencies as 2D @ 120 Hz.

Instructions: How to Overclock an HDTV to 120 Hz Native From a HTPC
(50% less videogame motion blur)

NOTE: You must have a HDTV that already has internal electronics for 120 Hz for a different purpose (e.g. motion interpolation, 3D shutter glasses) but otherwise has an EDID that tells you it only supports 60 Hz. Even so, there is no guarantee the electronics can be "coaxed" to accept native 120 Hz. It only sometimes works with some models of HDTV's.

  1. Get a high-end Radeon or Geforce product. I recommend Geforce GTX 680
    ...As a side effect, the nVidia Geforce cards are also compatible with LightBoost strobe backlights (found in zero motion blur monitors like ASUS VG248QE and BENQ XL2411T) which brings CRT-quality better-than-plasma motion to high-end desktop video gaming (LightBoost HOWTO). Consequently, nVidia Geforce products are currently preferred (at this time of writing) over AMD Radeon product.
    .
  2. Connect your computer to the HDTV first.
    ...Turn off mirror mode, make your HDTV your primary display. Otherwise, it won't work properly.
    .
  3. Install an EDID override file. These are sometimes difficult to install.
    ....If you need to get familiar with how EDID overrides are installed (e.g. 3D Vision Blog Instructions (different purpose), Microsoft technical info).
    (a) Download one of the 1080p@120Hz files (1080p@120Hz EDID Overrides in this thread). Your HDTV will 'masquerade' as a 120 Hz computer monitor, allowing your graphic card to 'force' 120 Hz to be sent into your HDTV. Then you can see if the display successfully syncs to it!
    (b) To install an EDID Override, download the file, then right-click this INF file in File Explorer and select “Install”. Next, go to Device Manager and right-click your monitor, select “Update Driver Software”, then “Browser my computer…”, then “Let me pick…”, then disable “Show compatible hardware”, then select the “EDID Override” from manufacturer ASUS (even if you don’t have ASUS), and then reboot.
    (c) IMPORTANT! (Windows 8 specific): If you’re installing under Windows 8, follow these instructions to disable driver signature enforcement before installing this INF file. The INF file is installed via right-clicking the monitor in Control Panel -> Device Manager, and updating its driver.

    .
  4. Test the 120 Hz refresh rate
    ...If it fails, try other refresh rates such as 75Hz and others.
    .
  5. Test all connections. VGA, DVI, HDMI
    ...Sometimes, a HDTV successfully overclocks to 120 Hz on one connection only.
    ...Remember to use sufficient cables (Dual-Link DVI cable, HDMI 1.4 compliant cable)
    .
  6. Try testing 720p @ 120 Hz instead of 1080p @ 120 Hz
    ...This more commonly works in an overclock attempt since it's the same dotclock as shutter 3D 720p @ 60 Hz per eye (which is actually officially supported)
    .
  7. If all else fails but you want to buy a HDTV that works with native 120 Hz, you need to do testing
    ...Currently, refresh rate overclocking is bleeding edge territory currently being trailblazed by sites such as 120hz.net and others. This is a new technique that is only slowly gaining use by power users. Thus, you have to test with a 120 Hz PC until you find one that works with native 120 Hz. Within a few months, there might be an official list of overclockable HDTV's. If you have a new model to add, email me at mark[at]blurbusters.com
    ...This is currently time consuming because you need to reinstall the EDID override file every single time.
    .
  8. Or wait for the Geforce Titan.
    ...I've heard that it has an easy display overclock feature, eliminating the need for pesky EDID override files!
    .
  9. Will it damage my HDTV?
    ...Not likely. Fortunately, no display has shown adverse behavior because they are already designed to be 120 Hz for other purposes (3D shutter glasses, frame interpolation, etc). The chief problem is simply the firmware of the HDTV wasn't programmed to make it easy to accept 120 Hz native from an external source. Occasionally, this is possible to override, as is has been successfully accomplished with an EDID override with certain models (e.g. Vizio e3d420vx) and a number of other models.

Thanks,
Mark Rejhon

www.BlurBusters.com

BlurBusters Blog -- Eliminating Motion Blur by 90%+ on LCD for games and computers

Rooting for upcoming low-persistence rolling-scan OLEDs too!

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post #2 of 12 Old 02-20-2013, 04:34 PM - Thread Starter
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EDIT: New Blur Busters HOWTO: HDTV Refresh Rate Overclocking ...
... I created this HOWTO after I made this forum post, since more and more people are tinkering with this nowadays.

Also check out the new AnandTech Geforce Titan Preview of Display Overclocking.

Thanks,
Mark Rejhon

www.BlurBusters.com

BlurBusters Blog -- Eliminating Motion Blur by 90%+ on LCD for games and computers

Rooting for upcoming low-persistence rolling-scan OLEDs too!

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post #3 of 12 Old 07-26-2013, 10:02 PM
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Good stuff I am tempting to get my Benq w7000 to do 120hz. So far no luck. I will keep at as it says it is capable of 120hz in the Catylst control centre.

James Reid:D
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post #4 of 12 Old 07-26-2013, 10:54 PM
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Ok, I'll bite...

Why would we want to do this other than the obvious for gaming?

It seems you would need some sort of frame-doubling or interpolation to make this worth it for video/movies. Granted... this already exists with SVP for HTPCs... but interpolating to 120Hz is very, very taxing on a CPU/GPU.
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post #5 of 12 Old 07-26-2013, 11:01 PM
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I think it is mostly a gaming thing.
For computer displays, I do encourage ppl check out refresh rate overclocking to get 72hz or 48hz for use with 24p videos.
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post #6 of 12 Old 07-26-2013, 11:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MlNDBOMB View Post

I think it is mostly a gaming thing.
For computer displays, I do encourage ppl check out refresh rate overclocking to get 72hz or 48hz for use with 24p videos.

Does the display handle the repeated frames, or does the video card handle the repeated frames? Plus, 120Hz is the magic number for video/film as it's a multiple of 24, 30, and 60 fps.

EDIT: Nevermind... of course the video card handles the repeated frames, the TV is synced at 120Hz.
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post #7 of 12 Old 08-29-2013, 07:35 AM
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Well some interesting news for those who have the Seiki 39in 4k tv, I created a custom resolution of 1920x1000 at 120hz, with the CRU and checked it to confirm and this tv is now running at 120hz. Pretty cool. When I tried to game it blanked out on me. However i was able to play movies and the desktop is stable.I would imagine that in the future there may be a firmware update that can help with that.I also created a resolution of 2560x1440 @ 60hz. Gaming was much improved over the UHD res and still looks fantastic. However ultimately I would like to be able to FPS game at 120hz. Its interesting because i spoke with Seiki and they said this tv will only accept a 60hz input.

James Reid:D
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post #8 of 12 Old 08-30-2013, 02:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cardoski View Post

Well some interesting news for those who have the Seiki 39in 4k tv, I created a custom resolution of 1920x1000 at 120hz, with the CRU and checked it to confirm and this tv is now running at 120hz. Pretty cool. When I tried to game it blanked out on me. However i was able to play movies and the desktop is stable.I would imagine that in the future there may be a firmware update that can help with that.I also created a resolution of 2560x1440 @ 60hz. Gaming was much improved over the UHD res and still looks fantastic. However ultimately I would like to be able to FPS game at 120hz. Its interesting because i spoke with Seiki and they said this tv will only accept a 60hz input.

39 inch one accepts 120Hz (1080p) and 240Hz (720p) but only displays 60Hz so you don't really get a benefit unfortunately...

The 50 inch seiki will accept and display 120Hz (1080p) and accept 240Hz but only display 120hz @ 720p but 720p gives reduced input lag.
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post #9 of 12 Old 08-30-2013, 11:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xevious View Post

39 inch one accepts 120Hz (1080p) and 240Hz (720p) but only displays 60Hz so you don't really get a benefit unfortunately...

The 50 inch seiki will accept and display 120Hz (1080p) and accept 240Hz but only display 120hz @ 720p but 720p gives reduced input lag.


Well i have it running stable at 120hz now, I tested the frame rate and it says my screen is doing 120fps and the tv itself said 1080p 120hz. So i have to assume I am getting a benefit. In fact The amd Catylyst control center reports 120hz as maximum rate. So I am not sure what to think.

James Reid:D
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post #10 of 12 Old 08-31-2013, 06:59 AM
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Only TN panels can do 120Hz natively to my knowledge. Overclocking IPS panels just makes it worse. They tend to skip every other frame to mimic that 120Hz look, or so have I heard. Do TVs use IPS panels? Are you sure you aren't just seeing skipped frames?
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post #11 of 12 Old 08-31-2013, 07:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amarshonarbangla View Post

Only TN panels can do 120Hz natively to my knowledge. Overclocking IPS panels just makes it worse. They tend to skip every other frame to mimic that 120Hz look, or so have I heard. Do TVs use IPS panels? Are you sure you aren't just seeing skipped frames?


Well according to my tests it is doing 120hz, I provided a pic of one of the tests. And the TV says 120hz. I looks great and gaming is smooth. i have a few 120hz 3D monitors and it is the same smoothness.Oh and I believe the TV is an MVA panel.And just to be clear, the 120hz is at 1080p.
Just to add to this I played a game of MOH WarFighter at 1080p with the settings on Ultra and ran FRAPS and I had FPS up to 132 and as low 104. It was around 120 most of the time and looked and felt fantastic.

James Reid:D
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post #12 of 12 Old 09-03-2013, 03:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cardoski View Post


Well according to my tests it is doing 120hz, I provided a pic of one of the tests. And the TV says 120hz. I looks great and gaming is smooth. i have a few 120hz 3D monitors and it is the same smoothness.Oh and I believe the TV is an MVA panel.And just to be clear, the 120hz is at 1080p.
Just to add to this I played a game of MOH WarFighter at 1080p with the settings on Ultra and ran FRAPS and I had FPS up to 132 and as low 104. It was around 120 most of the time and looked and felt fantastic.


Ok so I took a picture of the UFO test and sure enough there was frame skipping. Oh well looking forward to the firmware fix because it looks great as is.

James Reid:D
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