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post #1 of 12 Old 03-27-2013, 01:07 PM - Thread Starter
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I just recently moved to a new apartment, a basement level apartment in a single-family home. In the previous house I rented which was smaller I had no trouble running the CAT6 cable along the walls on the floor into the different rooms of the house. However in this case, I have a much larger space so its going to take more cable to run in two different rooms. My new landlady whom I know personally has given me free reign in running the cable however I would like. Problem is though is most of the basement walls are brick so it looks like I will have to do long wire runs again (home built in the 60's).

Basically, my LL has an N-router in her part of the upstairs (she lives above me) so I can connect my laptop to that with no problem. She ran a wired CAT5e from her router to the den area of my space through a room corner in the ceiling. But seemingly as I have had a wired network in my previous rental I plan to do the same here. Not sure if I want to run another router in my area since I have had the Linksys WRT54G in use before or just run gigabit switches from where the cable enters my area and wire it from there. I have to go up a short set of steps to get to the bedroom areas, one being my main bedroom and the other for my studio setup. I plan to build another HTPC for my bedroom to where I can stream all of my BD 1080p rips seamlessly to the bedroom and the studio area when needed, so the best way to do that is via wired.

What's the best way to run the cabling in these kinds of situations for a stable gigabit network?
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post #2 of 12 Old 03-27-2013, 01:47 PM
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Originally Posted by AVTechMan View Post

I just recently moved to a new apartment, a basement level apartment in a single-family home. In the previous house I rented which was smaller I had no trouble running the CAT6 cable along the walls on the floor into the different rooms of the house. However in this case, I have a much larger space so its going to take more cable to run in two different rooms. My new landlady whom I know personally has given me free reign in running the cable however I would like. Problem is though is most of the basement walls are brick so it looks like I will have to do long wire runs again (home built in the 60's).

Basically, my LL has an N-router in her part of the upstairs (she lives above me) so I can connect my laptop to that with no problem. She ran a wired CAT5e from her router to the den area of my space through a room corner in the ceiling. But seemingly as I have had a wired network in my previous rental I plan to do the same here. Not sure if I want to run another router in my area since I have had the Linksys WRT54G in use before or just run gigabit switches from where the cable enters my area and wire it from there. I have to go up a short set of steps to get to the bedroom areas, one being my main bedroom and the other for my studio setup. I plan to build another HTPC for my bedroom to where I can stream all of my BD 1080p rips seamlessly to the bedroom and the studio area when needed, so the best way to do that is via wired.

What's the best way to run the cabling in these kinds of situations for a stable gigabit network?

If you can remove ceiling you can run cables that way. Also, are the walls finished? you can fish wires behind the sheetrock.

6 TV's in the house on FiOS and we only pay $4.99/month to connect them all!!! Power to the CableCard and WMC7!!!
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post #3 of 12 Old 03-27-2013, 03:00 PM
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The brick walls make it though but ... if there is baseboard trim make a raceway in the back of it by creating a groove. You can also install crown molding and run the wires behind that. Access through the ceiling joists would be good if you can get to them.

 

 

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post #4 of 12 Old 03-28-2013, 12:28 AM
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Personally, I'd just buy a few Ethernet over Power adapter

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post #5 of 12 Old 03-28-2013, 12:48 AM - Thread Starter
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Personally, I'd just buy a few Ethernet over Power adapter

How well do the Power adapters work, especially for streaming HD content?

Appreciate the suggestions others have offered so far. If I decide to go wired I will have to route them accordingly. The ceiling tiles are large so they are easily removable for me to route them along the ceiling.
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post #6 of 12 Old 03-28-2013, 08:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AVTechMan View Post

How well do the Power adapters work, especially for streaming HD content?

Appreciate the suggestions others have offered so far. If I decide to go wired I will have to route them accordingly. The ceiling tiles are large so they are easily removable for me to route them along the ceiling.


We have four TP-LINK TL-PA4010 powerline adapters set up in our home. I have only tested them in relation to the cable modem throughput and not for streaming between pcs in the house, but here is what I can say:

Setup:
1. Cable modem with integrated wifi (surprisingly good wifi in that little unit) ----> TP-LINK TL-PA4010 powerline adapter #1.
2. TP-LINK TL-PA4010 #2 ---> HTPC (1 room over from cable modem)
3. TP-LINK TL-PA4010 #3 ---> Xbox (1 room over from cable modem)
4. TP-LINK TL-PA4010 #4 ---> Office computer (upstairs and one room over from cable modem)

I also walked one of the units around the house with my laptop and tested it in a number of outlets in different rooms. 2400 sq. foot home, built 1965, most of the house is old 2-prong ungrounded outlets and wiring. Breaker box and some downstairs wiring (kitchen) has been updated.

Setup: Good but a tiny bit fussy. Synching the plugs together when using four of them took more than one try and a little finesse, but once I had them all synched together they stayed in synch even when moved around the house, etc.

Stability: Rock solid for me. Not a drop in connection anywhere so long as the ethernet cable is plugged in well. Cheap crappy ethernet cables may tend to slip a bit in the ethernet socket, but that's as much true on the pc end as on the adapter end. Watching Hulu and Netflix streaming for many many hours never once has the system dropped the ethernet connection.

Speed comparison. I used a simple test with Speedtest.net: chose one specific server, and used that server for all comparisons. I used a mobile workstation (i7 8gb ssd etc etc), wifi hard switch set to off, walking it from connector to connector, plug to plug, on battery power the whole time, to compare. I ran each connection three or four speed tests.
Results:
Direct Ethernet to Cable Modem: 33-35ping; 43-49mbps down; 4-5mbps up. This is what I am throttled at by Time Warner and the results are pretty stable.
Now, it did not seem to matter where I plugged in the TP-LINK TL-PA4010, I got the same results from essentially every plug in the house: 34-39ms ping; 22-33 mbps down; 3.5-4.5 mbps up. There is definitely some overhead on the adapters, which is likely due to encryption they are using, etc. The ping results were great, in my opinion, and the throughput perfectly fine for streaming from the cable modem, and even at 22mbps streaming audio or compressed hd from htpc to another system in the house should be fine. However, I highly doubt the ability of these adapters to handle your 1080p uncompressed bluray stream.

Just as a note of comparison, the wifi on my mobile workstation is faster than the powerline but with a hair higher ping (36-42). Unlike the powerline the wifi connection will break 42mbps. HOWEVER, the wifi is a little less stable and more prone to speed bumps/dips than the powerline.

Short version: Right now it appears the TP-LINK TL-PA4010 powerline adapter is perfect if a 22mbps minimum throughput (and normal speeds closer to 30mbps) is enough for what you are doing and you are looking for high stability in the connection, which means essentially any kind of video streaming over internet will be fine. It also should work find for compressed hd (mp2, mp4 etc) file streaming. However, for raw speed wireless will be better at the expense of stability. And, of course, neother touches ethernet for speed and stability.

I will try to do a file transfer test later this week and see if I get better results moving data within the local powerline network.
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post #7 of 12 Old 03-28-2013, 09:01 AM
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I'd use raceway crown molding or baseboard raceway.

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post #8 of 12 Old 03-28-2013, 10:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AVTechMan View Post

The ceiling tiles are large so they are easily removable for me to route them along the ceiling.

IMHO, no brainer. I would guess where the brick walls are they just support the floor joists above so you can go in-between the joists and come out the other side?

Oh, and a GigE switch where the Cat5e comes down sounds like a good idea.

If you want to make it all pretty, monoprice sells toolless Ethernet jacks here you just plug into the backside -- no wiring needed. Figure out the runs and buy cable that already has the plugs on the end and just coil up the excess in the ceiling.

 

 

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post #9 of 12 Old 03-28-2013, 10:35 AM - Thread Starter
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IMHO, no brainer. I would guess where the brick walls are they just support the floor joists above so you can go in-between the joists and come out the other side?

Oh, and a GigE switch where the Cat5e comes down sounds like a good idea.

If you want to make it all pretty, monoprice sells toolless Ethernet jacks here you just plug into the backside -- no wiring needed. Figure out the runs and buy cable that already has the plugs on the end and just coil up the excess in the ceiling.

These are the wide thick blocks for the walls. I do have two GigE switches so I could easily place one there and the other in the bedroom area. That way I can run cable from that to the studio room as needed. I'll look into these options. smile.gif
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post #10 of 12 Old 03-28-2013, 12:07 PM
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MoCA is another option if there is CATV wire in place already.

You won't get gigabit, but 300 Mbps is doable with currently available hardware that is not too terribly expensive.

6 TV's in the house on FiOS and we only pay $4.99/month to connect them all!!! Power to the CableCard and WMC7!!!
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post #11 of 12 Old 03-28-2013, 12:08 PM
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You need to build your own Ethernet network in your rented space as streaming the video through her router is gonna be a nightmare because the streaming traffic will have to go upstairs and then back down to you, eating up her network bandwidth. She might not have - well probably doesn't have is more accurate - a premium-grade router that can handle a lot of simultaneous network traffic. Just throw together your own wired network for media streaming and then use WiFi adapters/cards for the Internet. It will work wonderfully.
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post #12 of 12 Old 03-29-2013, 12:34 AM - Thread Starter
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You need to build your own Ethernet network in your rented space as streaming the video through her router is gonna be a nightmare because the streaming traffic will have to go upstairs and then back down to you, eating up her network bandwidth. She might not have - well probably doesn't have is more accurate - a premium-grade router that can handle a lot of simultaneous network traffic. Just throw together your own wired network for media streaming and then use WiFi adapters/cards for the Internet. It will work wonderfully.

Hmm, actually that's a good point. Now that I think of it she mentioned that she has a Belkin N router...one of the cheap ones and streaming HD video will definitely have an impact on the bandwidth. I have my own router (though not N) and two gigabit switches so I could wire my own network and have it run through my own router. My laptop and phone are the only devices that runs wireless on the internet. My PS3 though I may have wired internet for the sake of online gaming as I am not sure how efficient the PS3 is for wireless. Better start ordering some cable.
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