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post #1 of 51 Old 07-08-2013, 04:57 AM - Thread Starter
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I have two routers, Router No.1 , it is connected to the net, then I have a second wireless Router in my basement , Router No.2. All my HTPC, Server etc are connected to this router, Router No.2. I am trying to setup a static IP for the server and I can't access Router No.2 (Enter the router IP on written on the router itself), but I can access router No.1 from the Server. If I set the static IP for the LAN in router No.1 will that still work?

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post #2 of 51 Old 07-08-2013, 05:02 AM
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You want to operate Router 2 as a switch, not a router. To do that just plug the cable from Router 1 into a LAN port instead of the WAN port on Router 2, and leave the WAN port empty. Router 1 will do all the 'routing', you can assign the IP address there.
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post #3 of 51 Old 07-08-2013, 05:52 AM
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How are your two routers connected? If they are on the same LAN as your server did you turn off DHCP service on one of them?

On your server, find out which router issued the the IP address by running the DOS command ipconfig /all. The default gateway is your DHCP server (i.e. router). If router 1 and router 2 are on the same LAN and they have different network addresses, and if your server's IP address was issued by router1 even though it's physically connected to router2, then what you saw can be explained.
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post #4 of 51 Old 07-08-2013, 05:59 AM - Thread Starter
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Ran ipconfig and Router No.1 is the one assigning the IP.

Next question, I have set the IP's to static in the Network and Sharing Center> Change Adapter Settings> Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4) > Properties and then assign IP. Then I tested to see if all was good, which it was. So do I now need to go into the router and change the LAN settings to static?

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post #5 of 51 Old 07-08-2013, 08:45 AM
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The LAN settings on router 2 should be set to static. For example, router 1 could be 192.168.1.1 and router 2 could be 192.168.1.2. Then just make sure your DHCP address range on router 1 doesn't overlap with any static addresses. (like 192.168.1.200 - 192.168.1.240)
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post #6 of 51 Old 07-08-2013, 09:14 AM
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Are the 2 routers connected via wire, or wirelessly? Not all routers allow "range extender" mode, but almost all routers allow "bridge/access point" mode when connected Lan-to-Lan.

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post #7 of 51 Old 07-08-2013, 04:21 PM - Thread Starter
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Yes, they are connected LAN-to-LAN.

@jimbo, I can't access the second one, so I am assuming that it is acting as a switch???

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post #8 of 51 Old 07-08-2013, 04:59 PM
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You need to physically disconnect the second router from the network and connect a PC directly to it. Then go into its setting page (probably 192.168.1.1) and change that address to something different than the primary router, but on the same subnet (something like 192.168.1.2). Then reconnect everything and you should be able to access the other router using the new address. It also wouldn't hurt to turn off DHCP on the second router.

If you listed the exact model then someone could tell you exactly what to change.

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post #9 of 51 Old 07-08-2013, 07:41 PM - Thread Starter
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I am at work right now, so I can't give exact model numbers. I do however need that second router for it wireless capabilities. And there is no possible way to connect directly to the first router unless I could put something in between the two routers and connect the server and HTPC to that.

OK, this is my setup, the RS20i needs a wireless router to function for room EQ setup, so I need that router in the basement. Any ideas on how to connect the Server and HTPC direct to the first router?


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post #10 of 51 Old 07-08-2013, 08:13 PM
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I assume Router 2 only has 4 lan ports, but you show 5 lan connections., hence your need to connect the server elsewhere. You can simply add a switch between the routers and connect the server to that switch as well. Or you could add the switch "after" router 2 and connect devices to it. Whichever physically works best for your layout.
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post #11 of 51 Old 07-08-2013, 08:35 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanPackMan View Post

I assume Router 2 only has 4 lan ports, but you show 5 lan connections., hence your need to connect the server elsewhere. You can simply add a switch between the routers and connect the server to that switch as well. Or you could add the switch "after" router 2 and connect devices to it. Whichever physically works best for your layout.
It has 4 ports and a blue port for the LAN from router No.1, so essentially 5 ports. Can I just put a switch in between the two routers , connect the server and HTPC to switch and that will have them directly connected to router No.1?

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post #12 of 51 Old 07-08-2013, 08:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanPackMan View Post

You want to operate Router 2 as a switch, not a router. To do that just plug the cable from Router 1 into a LAN port instead of the WAN port on Router 2, and leave the WAN port empty. Router 1 will do all the 'routing', you can assign the IP address there.

I believe this is what Dan is referring to. All routing should be done by your first router since your second equipment is just an extension(repeater or access point), so you just want to connect the cable coming from router 1 to a "normal" LAN port and leave the WAN port unused on router 2(not used for routing in this scenario but as a repeater).

Things to check in router #2's configuration:
- Static IP in the same subnet as the first one but different from it(ex: 192.168.100.2), and outside of Router 1's DHCP scope
- Gateway is router 1's IP address
- Disable DHCP

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post #13 of 51 Old 07-08-2013, 09:37 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krakhen View Post

I believe this is what Dan is referring to. All routing should be done by your first router since your second equipment is just an extension(repeater or access point), so you just want to connect the cable coming from router 1 to a "normal" LAN port and leave the WAN port unused on router 2(not used for routing in this scenario but as a repeater).

Things to check in router #2's configuration:
- Static IP in the same subnet as the first one but different from it(ex: 192.168.100.2), and outside of Router 1's DHCP scope
- Gateway is router 1's IP address
- Disable DHCP
OK, so if I do that, will I still have WiFi capabilities for the RS20i receiver and wireless laptop from the Router No.2?

Currently the Gateway is router No.1's IP address.

Thanks.

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post #14 of 51 Old 07-09-2013, 03:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JapanDave View Post

I am at work right now, so I can't give exact model numbers. I do however need that second router for it wireless capabilities. And there is no possible way to connect directly to the first router unless I could put something in between the two routers and connect the server and HTPC to that.

OK, this is my setup, the RS20i needs a wireless router to function for room EQ setup, so I need that router in the basement. Any ideas on how to connect the Server and HTPC direct to the first router?

So you are saying you can't run an Ethernet cable between your two routers? If that's the case then you just killed any consistent transfer rate and that should be avoided if possible. What you would be trying to create in that situation is a wireless repeater bridge. Either way you go you should only have one router doing the "routing" on the network so the secondary router needs DHCP disabled.

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post #15 of 51 Old 07-09-2013, 04:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JapanDave View Post

OK, so if I do that, will I still have WiFi capabilities for the RS20i receiver and wireless laptop from the Router No.2?

Currently the Gateway is router No.1's IP address.

Thanks.

Yes, the wireless function of router 2 will still work with nothing plugged into the WAN port. Basically, Router 2 becomes a wireless access point and a switch. As long as you only use the LAN ports you can add another switch anywhere you want and everything will connect to, and be controlled by Router 1.
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post #16 of 51 Old 07-09-2013, 04:12 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krakhen View Post

I believe this is what Dan is referring to. All routing should be done by your first router since your second equipment is just an extension(repeater or access point), so you just want to connect the cable coming from router 1 to a "normal" LAN port and leave the WAN port unused on router 2(not used for routing in this scenario but as a repeater).

Things to check in router #2's configuration:
- Static IP in the same subnet as the first one but different from it(ex: 192.168.100.2), and outside of Router 1's DHCP scope
- Gateway is router 1's IP address
- Disable DHCP

Will check that. Thanks for the clarification.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bryansj View Post

So you are saying you can't run an Ethernet cable between your two routers? If that's the case then you just killed any consistent transfer rate and that should be avoided if possible. What you would be trying to create in that situation is a wireless repeater bridge. Either way you go you should only have one router doing the "routing" on the network so the secondary router needs DHCP disabled.
No,No, What I mean is that I only have one Ethernet cable running to my basement and due to the fact that I need a wireless router for my receiver I just can't go with a switch, I need the Ethernet cable to connect to the router. But, if I can have a switch before the router and have the server and HTPC on the switch, then have the RS20i on the router, that would work. I am not doing wireless to wireless, sorry for the confusion.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanPackMan View Post

Yes, the wireless function of router 2 will still work with nothing plugged into the WAN port. Basically, Router 2 becomes a wireless access point and a switch. As long as you only use the LAN ports you can add another switch anywhere you want and everything will connect to, and be controlled by Router 1.
Great, then this is the way to go. I may need to buy a switch anyway as I don't have enough ports if I do it this way.

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post #17 of 51 Old 07-09-2013, 05:11 AM
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Internet --> Router 1 --> 8 Port Gigabit Switch --> Router 2 with DHCP disabled in Access Point (AP) Mode

The only drawback to having the single run between the router and the switch is that your devices only have the single gigabit line to share. In real world performance it will probably not matter since you probably won't be accessing multiple devices with a full copy at the same time. What will happen is if you perform a copy between your Server and HTPC Living Room and My PC to HTPC Basement then your line would be saturated. Devices on the same switch all have full gigabit access between each other so you can transfer between HTPC Living Room to HTPC Bedroom and HTPC Kids and My PC without saturating (as well as Family PC to Server). Sending Blu-ray streams from your server to the HTPCs at the same time will probably not saturate the gigabit link.

Here is my setup before I switched my server to ESXi. It shows two routers with one in AP mode.

Now I've disabled the AP WiFi G router and replaced it with the WiFi N router running as just an access point. My new router is a PFSense virtual machine running on my server.

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post #18 of 51 Old 07-09-2013, 09:09 PM - Thread Starter
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Wow, that looks like a complicated setup. I have decided to get rid of the two wireless routers I have and get an Asus RT- Ac66u Router. That should get a signal to my basement, then I will run all other devices in the basement through a switch. Again a great learning experience for me, so thanks guys.

Another reason I am going to do this is b/c I am getting server stuttering on my living and bedroom room HTPC . Any movie is un-watchable. Could this be b/c of a slow cable? What is the buffer rate of XBMC?

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post #19 of 51 Old 07-10-2013, 03:56 AM
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A simple way to check your cables is to look at the connection speed. Make sure they all read 1 Gbps and not 100 Mbps. If any read 100 Mbps then there is something wrong with the wiring. Gigabit Ethernet needs all eight wires, but 100 Mbps Ethernet only needs four. When one is damaged or there is a termination issue then Gigabit drops down to 100 Mbps.

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post #20 of 51 Old 07-10-2013, 06:36 AM - Thread Starter
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I ran the xbmc on a PC that is on the same connection and it had no problem. I am pretty sure I screwed up a setting somewhere. I don't know where, so I re-installed and all is good now. Thanks for the help.smile.gif

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post #21 of 51 Old 07-12-2013, 05:48 PM - Thread Starter
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OK, the Asus RT- Ac66u Router is here and setup. However, when trying to set my PC's to static, after rebooting them I can no longer connect, to the net or the Router proxy??? I kept one PC online just in case and I returned the settings DHCP and they are all back online. Do I need to also change the PC's settings to static along with the router?

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post #22 of 51 Old 07-12-2013, 06:57 PM
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I just set them static only on the router. I think this is how you would do it with your router.

http://support.asus.com/FAQ/Detail.aspx?SLanguage=en&no=5956A714-0CBB-7F2C-9AEA-2F2C8FAAD009&p=11&m=RT-N66U%20(VER.B1)

Doing it this way lets you keep DHCP enabled on all your devices, but they still have the same IP address.

Your issue might be that you are assigning IP address within your router's DHCP reserved range.

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post #23 of 51 Old 07-12-2013, 07:07 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bryansj View Post

I just set them static only on the router. I think this is how you would do it with your router.

http://support.asus.com/FAQ/Detail.aspx?SLanguage=en&no=5956A714-0CBB-7F2C-9AEA-2F2C8FAAD009&p=11&m=RT-N66U%20(VER.B1)

Doing it this way lets you keep DHCP enabled on all your devices, but they still have the same IP address.

Your issue might be that you are assigning IP address within your router's DHCP reserved range.

Yeah , that is how I did the first time. Checked the PC IP in cmd>ipconfig and I used the address assigned to it in the manual setup section.

I was under the impression that you had to assign the IP within the routers DHCP reserved range??? I am going to have to find this router range now.

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post #24 of 51 Old 07-13-2013, 05:16 AM
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No, it needs to be outside the reserved range. The router uses that pool of addresses to assign IP addresses to devices without static IPs. Either change the range or assign a different static IP.

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post #25 of 51 Old 07-13-2013, 05:26 AM
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That is right, it is best to have the individual device's static IP outside of the DHCP range so that the router doesn't give that address to a different device. Personally, I prefer to set my static IP's on the devices themselves and not the router, but either way is fine, just don't do both. A DCHP range of 1-50 is more than adequate for any normal user.
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OK, so my router has a range from 192.168.1.2 to 192.168.1.254, So I should be assigning an IP like 192.168.1.300?

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post #27 of 51 Old 07-13-2013, 07:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JapanDave View Post

OK, so my router has a range from 192.168.1.2 to 192.168.1.254, So I should be assigning an IP like 192.168.1.300?

Cant do that.

Change your range to 192.168.1.200 to 192.168.1.254. This will leave the first 200 addresses open for you to use.
After that unplug all devices from the router so they will get a new address above 200.
Now you can set up ip reservations on the router ( below 200) or set the computers for static addresses. If you use router reservations you will have to unplug one more time so the computer will get the new reserved address.

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post #28 of 51 Old 07-13-2013, 07:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JapanDave View Post

OK, so my router has a range from 192.168.1.2 to 192.168.1.254, So I should be assigning an IP like 192.168.1.300?

You don't need such a wide range. Change it to something like x.x.x.2 to x.x.x.50 or x.x.x.101 to x.x.x.150

And then assign an address outside the range you just defined but between x.x.x.2 and x.x.x.254 (300 is not a valid option).

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post #29 of 51 Old 07-13-2013, 07:41 AM
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Networking 101 for ip v4 addresses. ip v4 addresses are a 32 bit number usually expressed in "dot" notation as 4 decimal numbers which results in 4 numbers with each number in the range of 0-255 (00-FF hex, 00000000-11111111 binary)... there are 4 of these numbers so the range is 0.0.0.0 to 255.255.255.255 There is also a subnet mask that defines the network... in your case it is probably 255.255.255.0 which states your ip range can only use that last number and the first 3 are the same (your network range is 192.168.1.0-192.168.1.255)... however it cannot use 0 or 255 as 0 is the network address (x.x.x.0) and 255 (x.x.x.255) is the broadcast address. So 300 won't work. (note: x.x.x is for your network ... I believe you said it was 192.168.1.0)

What you should do is limit your dhcp addresses to something like 128-254, and then assign your static addresses to the 2-127 range (I started at 2 because I assume the router is at " x.x.x.1"), Depending on how your router sets the range it will be something like .128 through .254 or 192.168.1.128 /25
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post #30 of 51 Old 07-13-2013, 07:42 AM
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Just let the routers DHCP server allocate IP addresses and then reserve the ones that you want to always be assigned to specific devices. You should be able to then edit the address to anything else you want providing it is still within the routers DHCP address range.

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