Backblaze is only $5 a month to start protecting all your photos, music, movies ?? UNLIMITED BACKUP for ONLY 5$ Month ? What is the catch ? - Page 2 - AVS Forum
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post #31 of 59 Old 02-03-2014, 08:08 AM
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Just throwing in my 2 cents.

Online backups seem a little lacking for those of us who are more computer literate than the average person. When you already have a sever or NAS with multiple terabytes of movies and music on them (not to mention photos, work docs, tax docs, etc.) online backups will always be slower and less ideal than it would be for someone with a single terabyte (or less) of data. The monthly cost might also be higher than advertised due to the amount of bandwidth and drive space you require. For myself, with many, many terabytes of data to back up, online backups do not make sense. For my brother, who has maybe 500GBs of data total, an online solution at $5/month might make more sense than spending over $500 to build/buy a server/NAS. That $5/month will get him over 4 years of backup security while it might take me an entire year at current speeds to back up everything to the online servers!
All of the above is why I'm currently looking to buy another NAS (my fourth) which I will use to backup my current must-save docs from an offsite location (a family members house in another state) and have it auto-connect and backup my main NAS once a month. At about $500, this is the best way I can think of to keep my important and vital documents as safe as possible.

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post #32 of 59 Old 02-03-2014, 08:09 AM
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Originally Posted by captain_video View Post

Or you could just buy an external hard drive or two as a backup. I keep all of my home movies that I converted to digital from 8mm and VHS on my unRAID server and also a spare PC. An automated setup is certainly more convenient, but why pay someone else to backup your data when it's pretty simple to do it yourself?

That isn't offsite. I already have two local copies as well. If you suggest cycling a backup drive to an offsite location such as my desk at work, that only works well when you remember to do it. I'm paying about the price of cheap external drive per year and I don't have to even think about it. I dump pictures from my camera and the next morning they are already backed up locally on my server and to Crashplan. I was doing it for free with an external drive I seeded and connected at my parents house, but to many things would happen where the drive would become disconnected or their computer was off. I decided their Pro plan was worth it.

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post #33 of 59 Old 02-03-2014, 08:15 AM
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Originally Posted by MightyGeekMan View Post

Just throwing in my 2 cents.

Online backups seem a little lacking for those of us who are more computer literate than the average person. When you already have a sever or NAS with multiple terabytes of movies and music on them (not to mention photos, work docs, tax docs, etc.) online backups will always be slower and less ideal than it would be for someone with a single terabyte (or less) of data. The monthly cost might also be higher than advertised due to the amount of bandwidth and drive space you require. For myself, with many, many terabytes of data to back up, online backups do not make sense. For my brother, who has maybe 500GBs of data total, an online solution at $5/month might make more sense than spending over $500 to build/buy a server/NAS. That $5/month will get him over 4 years of backup security while it might take me an entire year at current speeds to back up everything to the online servers!
All of the above is why I'm currently looking to buy another NAS (my fourth) which I will use to backup my current must-save docs from an offsite location (a family members house in another state) and have it auto-connect and backup my main NAS once a month. At about $500, this is the best way I can think of to keep my important and vital documents as safe as possible.

I have FlexRAID running for my less important media that takes up the TBs of storage. Non-replaceable data gets backed up beyond that which is just over a TB in my case. I don't agree to any solution that has only local backups. I want a local backup for quick restores and an offsite backup. If the house burns down I want my non-replaceable data back. Having an external drive with backed up data in a house that is burnt to the ground isn't very useful.

At the least I have three copies: original, local backup, and off-site. In my case my local backup folder is part of my FlexRAID storage and also gets the Windows Server backup treatment.

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post #34 of 59 Old 02-03-2014, 03:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MightyGeekMan View Post

All of the above is why I'm currently looking to buy another NAS (my fourth) which I will use to backup my current must-save docs from an offsite location (a family members house in another state) and have it auto-connect and backup my main NAS once a month. At about $500, this is the best way I can think of to keep my important and vital documents as safe as possible.

What software will you use? I am also planning on digitizing all my home movies. I would prefer off site back up for these files. There could possibly be more than one TB.

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post #35 of 59 Old 02-03-2014, 04:12 PM
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I'm "lucky" enough to live in one of their data cap test markets (ATL). It was unlimited until December.

Ouch, suckfest. I didn't realize you're based in ATL. I was reading that you get charged extra past your cap on Comcast and thought, "wait that's only ATL" then I read your location. Interestingly it always seems to be that people in ATL have excessive issues with Comcast for CS, cablecard, and obviously their data caps. All good reasons to voice dissent

I hope they don't expand their test markets. My Internet bill will increase by *a lot*. How much extra per GB past the cap? Have you tested their data independently? Are they counting total u/d or just down?
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post #36 of 59 Old 02-03-2014, 04:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Dark_Slayer View Post

Ouch, suckfest. I didn't realize you're based in ATL. I was reading that you get charged extra past your cap on Comcast and thought, "wait that's only ATL" then I read your location. Interestingly it always seems to be that people in ATL have excessive issues with Comcast for CS, cablecard, and obviously their data caps. All good reasons to voice dissent

I hope they don't expand their test markets. My Internet bill will increase by *a lot*. How much extra per GB past the cap? Have you tested their data independently? Are they counting total u/d or just down?
If you go over 300GB you are charged $10 for another 50GB and so on. You can log into your account and see your usage same as always. I used 297GB in January.

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post #37 of 59 Old 02-03-2014, 05:08 PM
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Originally Posted by bryansj View Post

I'm "lucky" enough to live in one of their data cap test markets (ATL). It was unlimited until December.

I switched to comcast business and haven't looked back. Costs me about $20.00 more per month for 30/5 with no caps.

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post #38 of 59 Old 02-03-2014, 05:55 PM
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Originally Posted by robnix View Post

I switched to comcast business and haven't looked back. Costs me about $20.00 more per month for 30/5 with no caps.

I was initially going to get business when I switched from DSL a few years ago since they had a soft cap of 250GB. I figured I would just ride out the consumer plans for less money and faster speeds and then switch to business if needed. Right now I get Blast 50/10 with economy cable for $69/month. The extra $20 you mentioned could buy me an extra 100GB per month.

I liked it better last year when there were no caps.

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post #39 of 59 Old 02-04-2014, 06:10 AM
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What software will you use? I am also planning on digitizing all my home movies. I would prefer off site back up for these files. There could possibly be more than one TB.

Sent from my Nexus 7

I'm not going to use any specific software. AFAIK, once I set things up through the NAS units' control panel software, the'll auto-backup themselves. That's what they do right now over my wired network at home.

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post #40 of 59 Old 02-04-2014, 07:57 AM
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Originally Posted by captain_video View Post

Or you could just buy an external hard drive or two as a backup. I keep all of my home movies that I converted to digital from 8mm and VHS on my unRAID server and also a spare PC. An automated setup is certainly more convenient, but why pay someone else to backup your data when it's pretty simple to do it yourself?

Triplicating your data retention won't do anything for you if it's all co-located in your basement and you have a house fire or a flood. Having one version off-site is much safer, which is the point of backing up.

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post #41 of 59 Old 02-04-2014, 08:02 AM
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Originally Posted by BllDo View Post

Triplicating your data retention won't do anything for you if it's all co-located in your basement and you have a house fire or a flood. Having one version off-site is much safer, which is the point of backing up.

I agree. Your data isn't backed up until you have a copy off-site. Anything done locally is just playing the odds that your home will remain safe.

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post #42 of 59 Old 02-04-2014, 03:37 PM
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Originally Posted by MightyGeekMan View Post

I'm not going to use any specific software. AFAIK, once I set things up through the NAS units' control panel software, the'll auto-backup themselves. That's what they do right now over my wired network at home.

So you map the other end as a network drive and whomever is on the other end just has to be sure they don't change anything, right?
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post #43 of 59 Old 02-04-2014, 08:29 PM
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So you map the other end as a network drive and whomever is on the other end just has to be sure they don't change anything, right?

Not quite how it works.

Once properly set u, the local NAS and the off-site NAS connect to each other directly to automagically backup directories/folder/files. There is no need for hands-on intervention or oversight. Basically, once you connect the two NAS units and tell one to back up the other, they do it on their own and you don't need to think about it. Currently, thanks to QNap's RTRR (Real Time Remote Replication), my main NAS is backed up to the backup NAS every night without my presence needed. Similarly, when I set up the off-site NAS, it will connect to my current backup NAS once a month to do a full backup via the mystical portal known as "theinterwebnet".

You can find out more about RTRR here.

Hope this helps.

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post #44 of 59 Old 02-04-2014, 11:13 PM
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Well then, so both ends are running the same software? Or does RTRR do it all from the end that it's installed on, and the NAS or server on the other end simply has it's own static IP?

Sent from my Nexus 7
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post #45 of 59 Old 02-05-2014, 05:36 AM
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Originally Posted by MightyGeekMan View Post

Not quite how it works.

Once properly set u, the local NAS and the off-site NAS connect to each other directly to automagically backup directories/folder/files. There is no need for hands-on intervention or oversight. Basically, once you connect the two NAS units and tell one to back up the other, they do it on their own and you don't need to think about it. Currently, thanks to QNap's RTRR (Real Time Remote Replication), my main NAS is backed up to the backup NAS every night without my presence needed. Similarly, when I set up the off-site NAS, it will connect to my current backup NAS once a month to do a full backup via the mystical portal known as "theinterwebnet".

You can find out more about RTRR here.

Hope this helps.

Now that you've explained it better it sounds like the free CrashPlan option for PC to PC backup, but using two NASs on each end and other software. Seems cheaper just to fire up the free CrashPlan on each end and give the other person an external drive. That is what I started with and decided it was still worth it to pay the Cloud fee.

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post #46 of 59 Old 02-05-2014, 07:03 AM
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Now that you've explained it better it sounds like the free CrashPlan option for PC to PC backup, but using two NASs on each end and other software. Seems cheaper just to fire up the free CrashPlan on each end and give the other person an external drive. That is what I started with and decided it was still worth it to pay the Cloud fee.
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Originally Posted by leebo View Post

Well then, so both ends are running the same software? Or does RTRR do it all from the end that it's installed on, and the NAS or server on the other end simply has it's own static IP?

I think you're both still missing something, so let me start from the beginning. This might get a little long, and for that I apologize.

The reason I'm NOT using online backups is because I have over 15TBs of data that I want to backup. Regardless of how long it might take to get ALL my data into the cloud for the initial backup, the REAL problem is when I need to recover that data. Restoring 15TBs over the internet would take FOREVER. I know Crashplan has a Restore To Door feature (and most other online backup sites have something similar), but that costs $165 and the size limit is 3.5TBs. That's quite a pretty penny for what amounts to an external hard drive with your data being shipped to you, and you don't even get to keep the drive. My opinion is, if someone wanted to save a relatively "small" amount of data (under 2TBs) then it is safer and far more economical to buy two external hard drives and just do a monthly backup swap. That means backup everything every night to external hard drive A for a month, swap out external A for external B, move external A offsite (office, family member, friends house, etc.), backup everything to external B for a month and then swap again, continuing the cycle. You can easily find a couple of 2TB or larger external hard drives for around $250 total, and there are dozens of free backup programs (find just a few here) you can use to automate the process. As long as you can move the hard drive every month this is, to my mind, a much better solution than online backup services. Your data is always recoverable, usually in hours, and the cost is cheaper after the first year, when you take into account the extra fees online sites like Crashplan charge for sending a hard drive of your files for data recovery.

However, if you have more than 3TBs of data to backup, the online services simply do not work. Most services like Crashplan don't even offer a recovery method for that much data. And the places that do charge a massive amount of money because they're geared towards enterprise clients, not the personal/home office user.

All of this is why I'm using a personal, offsite NAS. I can do a full backup of ALL my data in my home and then move the NAS offsite. The offsite NAS will then automagically backup over the interwebnets, with no intervention or oversight on my part and little to no maintenance needed. Since it's starting with all 15TBs of data, the monthly backups will not take very long because only the new (or changed) files will need to be backed up. That's usually less than 10GBs a month which would take a few hours on a slow day.

Each NAS manufacturer has it's own version of automatic backup software (QNap is RTRR), but they all can be made to work with each other fairly easily since the underlying protocol (rsync) is the same. NAS's are self-contained units. So there's no software to install and, after initial setup, they don't need a computer to do their backup routines. All-in-all, I've found NAS units to be the best solution FOR ME at this time. Every person out there has a different use-case scenario and what works for me may not necessarily work for you. NAS's are not cheap, they can easily run over $2,000 WITHOUT hard drives when you get to the 8-bay units. Sometimes building your own makes a whole lot of sense. However, if you're not the type of person who wants the responsibility of being your own tech support if the server/NAS should have a problem AND you need to backup more than a couple of TBs of data, then a NAS might be right for you.

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post #47 of 59 Old 02-05-2014, 07:24 AM
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I think you're both still missing something, so let me start from the beginning. This might get a little long, and for that I apologize.

You are actually missing something I mentioned. Crashplan has a free option that does not involve their Cloud backup. You install the free Crashplan and backup your data to whatever you want, external drive or NAS, on site in your own house. You then go to somewhere else, such as a friend or parent, and connect that "seeded" backup. Install Crashplan on their system and point it to that seeded backup. You then invite your home account to that computer. Now your Crashplan sees the backup at the offsite location and you can do the same for the other account on your end to return the favor. Any changes you make at home get uploaded across the internet encrypted to the offsite location. When your house burns down you can physically obtain your backup drive and restore it on site or continue using the internet link. This is entirely free and does not use the Cloud other than you are technically creating a mini-cloud by doing this.

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post #48 of 59 Old 02-05-2014, 07:59 AM
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Originally Posted by bryansj View Post

You are actually missing something I mentioned. Crashplan has a free option that does not involve their Cloud backup. You install the free Crashplan and backup your data to whatever you want, external drive or NAS, on site in your own house. You then go to somewhere else, such as a friend or parent, and connect that "seeded" backup. Install Crashplan on their system and point it to that seeded backup. You then invite your home account to that computer. Now your Crashplan sees the backup at the offsite location and you can do the same for the other account on your end to return the favor. Any changes you make at home get uploaded across the internet encrypted to the offsite location. When your house burns down you can physically obtain your backup drive and restore it on site or continue using the internet link. This is entirely free and does not use the Cloud other than you are technically creating a mini-cloud by doing this.

This is a great option and one I will look into further. It may be something I can incorporate into the backup swap plan I outlined above. Thank you for explaining it to me.

However, I'd like to point out that this option still only works for "smaller" amounts of data (under 4TBs) since anything larger than that cannot currently be contained on a single external drive. And if you have a server or NAS units, you don't necessarily need Crashplan because most servers and NAS's have rsync for that purpose.

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post #49 of 59 Old 02-05-2014, 08:04 AM
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This is a great option and one I will look into further. It may be something I can incorporate into the backup swap plan I outlined above. Thank you for explaining it to me.

However, I'd like to point out that this option still only works for "smaller" amounts of data (under 4TBs) since anything larger than that cannot currently be contained on a single external drive. And if you have a server or NAS units, you don't necessarily need Crashplan because most servers and NAS's have rsync for that purpose.

Well I don't want my media backed up automatically offsite. The last thing I want to do is rip a Blu-ray and then upload 50GB and have the other end download 50GB each time. Pretty much the largest data I'm sending is a RAW dump from my camera and that turns out to be about a gig or two once I filter out the crap. My media is simply protected with on-site parity (FlexRAID) which isn't a true backup and I'm fine with it that way.

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post #50 of 59 Old 02-05-2014, 08:14 AM
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^ Completely agree. I have truly irreplaceable files like pictures, home movies, documents, tax files backed up in triplicate. For movies and music, I also just use parity on a server. It seems a terrible waste of time and money to backup something for which I have physical copies in the next room. Everyone’s data is different, but if my house burns down, I'm not going to be too terribly concerned if I lose my Pulp Fiction BD.

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post #51 of 59 Old 02-05-2014, 08:19 AM - Thread Starter
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^ Completely agree. I have truly irreplaceable file like pictures, home movies, documents, tax files backed up in triplicate. For movies and music, I also just use parity on a server. It seems a terrible waste of time and money to backup something for which I have physical copies in the next room. Everyone’s data is different, but if my house burns down, I'm not going to be too terribly concerned if I lose my Pulp Fiction BD.

+1

Media is too much physical size and volume and not important enough.

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post #52 of 59 Old 02-05-2014, 08:31 AM
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^ Completely agree. I have truly irreplaceable files like pictures, home movies, documents, tax files backed up in triplicate. For movies and music, I also just use parity on a server. It seems a terrible waste of time and money to backup something for which I have physical copies in the next room. Everyone’s data is different, but if my house burns down, I'm not going to be too terribly concerned if I lose my Pulp Fiction BD.

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+1

Media is too much physical size and volume and not important enough.

Well if I do end up with some media that I just couldn't live without, like the Justin Bieber movie and music, then I'll simply create a folder in my movie share called Important Media and point Crashplan to it. Then I'll always be a Bielieber no matter what.

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post #53 of 59 Old 02-05-2014, 08:37 AM
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I agree with all of you. In my case, since I run a graphic design business, even if you remove the 10TBs of music and movies from my NAS, I still have 5TBs of important data I need to back up off site. That is still too much for a Crashplan-like provider and is why I said offsite NAS backups work FOR ME. I don't plan on having my offsite NAS backup the media remotely, just my important personal and business files. For media, I'm probably going to use an external drive and manually backup my media to the remote NAS every 6 months, or whenever we get together for a family event. Media is easily replaced, as long as I don't have to manually re-rip EVERYTHING again.

With that said, I'd like to point out that if you don't make a copy of your ripped media files off site, then should something happen to your home you won't just lose the data, you might also lose the physical copies, too.
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post #54 of 59 Old 02-05-2014, 09:03 AM
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Absolutely, business critical data is a completely different ball game from my Spice Girls collection (which incidentally I keep in a safe deposit box along with my Justin Bieber posters.) There are other solutions for business critical data would be much more specific and targeted towards your needs. A company I used to work for used Iron Mountain. Barracuda also makes a solution. A google search would likely yield many others, which I'm guessing you have done. So, I'm just curious why you would be looking to Crashplan for something like this. Cost?

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post #55 of 59 Old 02-05-2014, 09:26 AM
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Absolutely, business critical data is a completely different ball game from my Spice Girls collection (which incidentally I keep in a safe deposit box along with my Justin Bieber posters.) There are other solutions for business critical data would be much more specific and targeted towards your needs. A company I used to work for used Iron Mountain. Barracuda also makes a solution. A google search would likely yield many others, which I'm guessing you have done. So, I'm just curious why you would be looking to Crashplan for something like this. Cost?

I'm always on the lookout for better ways to do things. Also, I'm continually trying to convince family and friends to back up their data, and any product that has a chance of making things simple and convenient for them is something I want to know about.

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post #56 of 59 Old 02-05-2014, 10:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MightyGeekMan View Post

However, I'd like to point out that this option still only works for "smaller" amounts of data (under 4TBs) since anything larger than that cannot currently be contained on a single external drive. And if you have a server or NAS units, you don't necessarily need Crashplan because most servers and NAS's have rsync for that purpose.

If I am understanding this, it sounds like Crashplan requires a computer be running on both ends for the automated back up to work? So if someone on one end causes the computer to get turned off the BU would not work?

Do home made servers like WHS 2011 have rsync? What info do you input into the NAS for it to find the target NAS?

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post #57 of 59 Old 02-05-2014, 10:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leebo View Post

If I am understanding this, it sounds like Crashplan requires a computer be running on both ends for the automated back up to work? So if someone on one end causes the computer to get turned off the BU would not work?

Do home made servers like WHS 2011 have rsync? What info do you input into the NAS for it to find the target NAS?

Sent from my Nexus 7

Yes, that is why I decided to pay for the Crashplan Pro Cloud service instead of relying on my parents to keep the PC and/or external drive connected and working. This is not much different than the target NAS needing to be up and ready for syncing.

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post #58 of 59 Old 02-05-2014, 11:36 AM
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Btw, WHS 2011 is on sale at Newegg today for $35. Link and code in the Computer Parts Deals thread.

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post #59 of 59 Old 02-06-2014, 06:52 PM - Thread Starter
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