How to manually configure a SSD Samsung EVO 840 - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 17 Old 04-07-2014, 07:23 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
stevethebrain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Atlanta,GA,Ft.Walton Bch.FL
Posts: 1,174
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 64 Post(s)
Liked: 25
How to manually configure a SSD

Please include step by step instructions.

I recently installed a Samsung EVO 840 120 GB SSD in my LT I installed the SW Magician
To setup and configure the SSD now I have this peaskie warning each time I bootup
So I would like to manually configure SSD then delete this SW and hopefully the peaskie warning will go away.

Here’s the settings I want
I like these settings in max reliability
Hibernation has been disabled (I usalley never use this function anyway).
Indexing service has been disabled
Virtual memory has been set to initial size of 200MB and maxium of 1GB

I don’t like this setting in max reliability
Sys. Restore automatic backups are dissabilied would like this enabled

Confussed on these settings which are unhighlighted in max reliability setting so it’s unknown to me wheather these are enabled or dissabled.
Perfetch
Write Cache buffer
Write Cache buffer flushing

I also used the Magician SW to make Win7 think the primary drive C:/ is actualley a SSD and not a HDD.

I assume that trim is automaticalley enabled w/ win7, because I did’nt set it on or off however I did verifiy it’s enabled.


note: I’m only using the SSD for OS and programs I have a external 1TB HDD for storage.

w/ the assistanse of Magician SW I have the majority of SSD setup still plan a few adjustments, so if I just delete the Magician SW will configureation be lost and the SSD go to defualt settings?

Thanks STB

 

Samsung PN58C500/Amp: Yamaha RX-V465/Polk DSW1KProSub/DefTECH SM450/C1CC/Pro80/Sony BPX37 BD/Magnavox515HTPC-CPU: I3 550, 3.2 GHz/Mobo: Intel H57/RAM: 6GB DDR3 1333/HDD: 1TB/2TB Internal, 1TB external/Tuner: 1600-950 Haupague/W7 64 OS Remote: Harmony 700
stevethebrain is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 17 Old 04-07-2014, 09:35 AM
Senior Member
 
mcturkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 343
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 43
There is no reason to disable hibernation, indexing, automatic system restore backups, or anything else when using an SSD. This has not been necessary for several years, in fact. Modern SSDs have such long duration at this point that it is extremely difficult to kill one off from too much writing. You'll upgrade everything else in your system several times over long before that SSD dies. You'll have replaced the SSD because 120GB isn't near enough space long before it dies.

The only thing you need to do is disconnect other drives (Windows gets confused sometimes and will install the boot data to one drive and the actual OS to another), install Windows, and then hook the other drives up. No other software or tweaks are needed - Windows 7, 8, and 8.1 all recognize SSDs correctly and automatically disable defragmentation scans (which do nothing on SSDs since there are no platters).
Mfusick and StinDaWg like this.
mcturkey is offline  
post #3 of 17 Old 04-07-2014, 11:43 AM
AVS Special Member
 
grittree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Austin TX
Posts: 2,091
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Liked: 21
I think that Samsung software is nothing but a marketing gimmick. The only possibly worthwhile feature is the partitioning off 10% for replacing bad cells. Otherwise, win7 and later handle everything automatically.
grittree is online now  
post #4 of 17 Old 04-07-2014, 01:08 PM
AVS Special Member
 
hammerdwn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Northern California
Posts: 4,749
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 96 Post(s)
Liked: 41
Other things you can do only with the software would be enabling RAPID mode and updating Firmware.
hammerdwn is offline  
post #5 of 17 Old 04-07-2014, 04:54 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
Mfusick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Western MA
Posts: 24,220
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 197 Post(s)
Liked: 1016
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcturkey View Post

There is no reason to disable hibernation, indexing, automatic system restore backups, or anything else when using an SSD. This has not been necessary for several years, in fact. Modern SSDs have such long duration at this point that it is extremely difficult to kill one off from too much writing. You'll upgrade everything else in your system several times over long before that SSD dies. You'll have replaced the SSD because 120GB isn't near enough space long before it dies.

The only thing you need to do is disconnect other drives (Windows gets confused sometimes and will install the boot data to one drive and the actual OS to another), install Windows, and then hook the other drives up. No other software or tweaks are needed - Windows 7, 8, and 8.1 all recognize SSDs correctly and automatically disable defragmentation scans (which do nothing on SSDs since there are no platters).

+1 AND THUMBS UP

-

"Too much is almost enough. Anything in life worth doing is worth overdoing. Moderation is for cowards."
Mfusick is offline  
post #6 of 17 Old 04-08-2014, 06:16 AM
AVS Special Member
 
bryansj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 6,446
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 112 Post(s)
Liked: 204
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

+1 AND THUMBS UP

But if you remember from the other thread this was a cloning of a HDD to the SSD.

bryansj is offline  
post #7 of 17 Old 04-08-2014, 08:03 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
Mfusick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Western MA
Posts: 24,220
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 197 Post(s)
Liked: 1016
Quote:
Originally Posted by bryansj View Post

But if you remember from the other thread this was a cloning of a HDD to the SSD.

His first mistake .

-

"Too much is almost enough. Anything in life worth doing is worth overdoing. Moderation is for cowards."
Mfusick is offline  
post #8 of 17 Old 04-08-2014, 09:38 AM
Senior Member
 
mcturkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 343
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

His first mistake .

Agreed, it's never a good idea to clone from one drive to another unless they are the same type of drive. Even then, drive alignment (4k vs 512) issues can come up, as well as partition re-sizing problems. Unless you are creating an image to deploy to numerous systems, or a backup image to restore to, it's usually better to do a clean OS installation, then restore your individual data/settings. A Windows 7 install, including driver installation and reboots, takes about an hour if done from a DVD. If you use a USB stick, you can be done in 30-40 minutes. Windows 8/8.1 is even faster. Then restore your data and settings. Cloning is quicker if it works perfectly, but if something goes awry, you're going to spend way more time trying to fix it than if you'd just done the clean OS install in the first place.
mcturkey is offline  
post #9 of 17 Old 04-08-2014, 10:00 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
Mfusick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Western MA
Posts: 24,220
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 197 Post(s)
Liked: 1016
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcturkey View Post

Agreed, it's never a good idea to clone from one drive to another unless they are the same type of drive. Even then, drive alignment (4k vs 512) issues can come up, as well as partition re-sizing problems. Unless you are creating an image to deploy to numerous systems, or a backup image to restore to, it's usually better to do a clean OS installation, then restore your individual data/settings. A Windows 7 install, including driver installation and reboots, takes about an hour if done from a DVD. If you use a USB stick, you can be done in 30-40 minutes. Windows 8/8.1 is even faster. Then restore your data and settings. Cloning is quicker if it works perfectly, but if something goes awry, you're going to spend way more time trying to fix it than if you'd just done the clean OS install in the first place.


You are beyond wise. I've been saying exactly this for a long time around here. Every time I say this someone seems to pop into the thread after me and convince the OP that cloning is better- at this point I usually exit the thread and move on with my life. More than half the time more threads and problems pop up and I shake my head. Just reading Stevethebrains threads make my brain hurt. I could have done what he wants in about 40 minutes without any issues. There's so much nonsense it's hard to remove it all and provide clear direction.

if you want to upgrade your SSD OS you should:

First,
Download windows ISO and make installable USB stick (or use disc)
Second,
Install windows OS to a bare clean drive- or format it under advanced and partition then install on a used drive.
Third,
Install the MFG drivers from the MFG webpage (motherboard) [ it helps to do this and put them all on a USB stick prior to starting if you need a LAN driver ]
Fourth,
Install and run windows updates a few times.
Fifth,
Install your software and programs you wants [again you can pre-download them and have them ready to go on USB stick for quicker]
Sixth,
Make a DVD restore disk, and/or a backup and label it with the date and info so you can restore back to this point next time if needed.

Live happily ever after.

It's easier than the trouble Steve the brain has had thus far, and the performance is superior. Nothing runs as smooth as a clean fresh install. biggrin.gif
Also,

other than making sure you install your OS with BIOS in ACHI mode for SSD there is little other tweaks to settings you need to do. All that "tweaks" are just mumbo jumbo BS.

-

"Too much is almost enough. Anything in life worth doing is worth overdoing. Moderation is for cowards."
Mfusick is offline  
post #10 of 17 Old 04-10-2014, 02:31 PM
AVS Special Member
 
augerpro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Denver, Colorado
Posts: 1,715
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked: 29
So you guys really think there can be issues going SSD to SSD using say Acronis to do the imaging? I really need to step up my capacity and I DREAD doing a clean install. Takes me 2 days to get everything where I want it again.
augerpro is offline  
post #11 of 17 Old 04-10-2014, 02:50 PM
Senior Member
 
mcturkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 343
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by augerpro View Post

So you guys really think there can be issues going SSD to SSD using say Acronis to do the imaging? I really need to step up my capacity and I DREAD doing a clean install. Takes me 2 days to get everything where I want it again.

Going from SSD to SSD will probably be OK, since these should all use the same alignment. HDD->SSD (or vice versa) is where a lot of problems occur. Still, it's worthwhile to backup your configuration/data in case the imaging process doesn't work and you need to reinstall.
mcturkey is offline  
post #12 of 17 Old 04-10-2014, 05:24 PM
AVS Special Member
 
J_Palmer_Cass's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 6,475
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 277 Post(s)
Liked: 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcturkey View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

His first mistake .

Agreed, it's never a good idea to clone from one drive to another unless they are the same type of drive. Even then, drive alignment (4k vs 512) issues can come up, as well as partition re-sizing problems. Unless you are creating an image to deploy to numerous systems, or a backup image to restore to, it's usually better to do a clean OS installation, then restore your individual data/settings. A Windows 7 install, including driver installation and reboots, takes about an hour if done from a DVD. If you use a USB stick, you can be done in 30-40 minutes. Windows 8/8.1 is even faster. Then restore your data and settings. Cloning is quicker if it works perfectly, but if something goes awry, you're going to spend way more time trying to fix it than if you'd just done the clean OS install in the first place.



After reading the above I was a bit worried, so I had to check out all of my hard drives (internal and external) to see what I own. It appears that all of my drives are 4k, so no problem there.

Now what is the basic problem of cloning from a HDD to a SSD?

I recently had to do a HDD OS & program re-install from my external HDD C:\ backup, and it only took about 1/2 an hour beginning to end. Maybe 5 minutes to do the setup.
J_Palmer_Cass is offline  
post #13 of 17 Old 04-10-2014, 10:37 PM
Senior Member
 
ikkuranus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 222
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Liked: 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcturkey View Post

There is no reason to disable hibernation, indexing, automatic system restore backups, or anything else when using an SSD. This has not been necessary for several years, in fact. Modern SSDs have such long duration at this point that it is extremely difficult to kill one off from too much writing. You'll upgrade everything else in your system several times over long before that SSD dies. You'll have replaced the SSD because 120GB isn't near enough space long before it dies.
I disable hibernation every time. I do it to save space and not because of the misguided belief that it will cause the drive to fail early. My Computers are either on, off, or using str(S3).
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcturkey View Post

The only thing you need to do is disconnect other drives (Windows gets confused sometimes and will install the boot data to one drive and the actual OS to another), install Windows, and then hook the other drives up. No other software or tweaks are needed - Windows 7, 8, and 8.1 all recognize SSDs correctly and automatically disable defragmentation scans (which do nothing on SSDs since there are no platters).

I cringe a little every time someone posts something like this. Yes it gets the job done but it also means you will more then likely have to do it again in the future on each and every reinstall. The proper way to ensure windows only gets installed to one drive is to ensure that your primary hdd or ssd is setup as the first non removable boot device in the bios or uefi. During installation if you see the drive you wish to install to (not including extra partitions) at the very top, then you can rest assured that it will install all files to that one drive this time and every time after without having to disconnect any drives.

In the event your drive does not show up at the very top during installation you should go back into bios/uefi boot menu and make sure it is the first drive. In some special cases you wont have the option to make certain drives the very first. In my experience this has only happened when dealing with older motherboards that have both sata and ide but don't have the option to specify which controller has priority. Unfortunately if you fall under that category unplugging may be the only choice.

ikkuranus is offline  
post #14 of 17 Old 04-11-2014, 06:10 AM
Member
 
billdacat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 188
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Liked: 16
To clone or not to clone?? That is the question..
Or has my grampappy would say "Quit your cloning around, dam it!"

Mfusick: How am I going to reinstall worthless manufactures bloat-ware if I don't clone??? eek.gif

Que flying monkeys...

Sorry .....I can't help it; just having some fun.
billdacat is offline  
post #15 of 17 Old 04-11-2014, 12:51 PM
Advanced Member
 
sawfish's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 848
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 61 Post(s)
Liked: 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by ikkuranus View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by mcturkey View Post

The only thing you need to do is disconnect other drives (Windows gets confused sometimes and will install the boot data to one drive and the actual OS to another), install Windows, and then hook the other drives up. No other software or tweaks are needed - Windows 7, 8, and 8.1 all recognize SSDs correctly and automatically disable defragmentation scans (which do nothing on SSDs since there are no platters).

I cringe a little every time someone posts something like this. Yes it gets the job done but it also means you will more then likely have to do it again in the future on each and every reinstall. The proper way to ensure windows only gets installed to one drive is to ensure that your primary hdd or ssd is setup as the first non removable boot device in the bios or uefi. During installation if you see the drive you wish to install to (not including extra partitions) at the very top, then you can rest assured that it will install all files to that one drive this time and every time after without having to disconnect any drives.

In the event your drive does not show up at the very top during installation you should go back into bios/uefi boot menu and make sure it is the first drive. In some special cases you wont have the option to make certain drives the very first. In my experience this has only happened when dealing with older motherboards that have both sata and ide but don't have the option to specify which controller has priority. Unfortunately if you fall under that category unplugging may be the only choice.

The problem is, Windows can enumerate multiple drives differently than the BIOS, and I'm not aware performing an extra-special BIOS tweak can change this fact. The problem is definitely not limited to old motherboards.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/937251

Presumably if Windows installer gets the drive order right, it won't do anything stupid anyway like writing the boot files to a secondary drive, but if you see Windows has borked the drive order, don't go through with the install. Power down, disconnect the secondary drives, and start over. I would recommend disconnecting the drives anyway.
sawfish is online now  
post #16 of 17 Old 04-11-2014, 06:23 PM
Member
 
Jerry Murphy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 41
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12

Back in the days of Vista and early Win 7, I used robocopy to clone HDDs very effectively.

For standard HDDs I would install OS, updates, software. Once system was running the way like I would robocopy to a different HD that would than be the main HD.

Reason for doing this?

During installation/updates, individual files are blotched all over the HD. A single file can be broken down into dozens of spots all over the HD. Yes defrag can reassemble files to a degree. But usually never back as one file all together intact regardless which defrag app you use. Especially large files for say.. a game like WoW. Robocopy will start at very beginning of HDD and duplicate one file at a time. Fully intact files. It's a slight improvement in boot time etc for awhile. Worth the time? Na... but it's something I do. Let robocopy run on new systems while I go watch Dr Who.

 

I never tried this on a SSD. I think the old command I used was ~  ROBOCOPY E:\ C:\ /e /efsraw /copyall /dcopy:t /r:0

 

Anyone else familiar with robocopy and usage on SSD?

Jerry Murphy is offline  
post #17 of 17 Old 05-02-2014, 07:29 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
stevethebrain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Atlanta,GA,Ft.Walton Bch.FL
Posts: 1,174
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 64 Post(s)
Liked: 25
update the SSD and extrenal 1TB HDD is working out good I just have to remember when I create folders to create in external drive E,

I've disabled all the peaskie warnings will try to remember to enable warning when I DL stuff.

anyone here have the PNY pro 240 SSD this will be the next SSD I try out, I would like to know if it has the peaskie warning?

Thanks STB

 

Samsung PN58C500/Amp: Yamaha RX-V465/Polk DSW1KProSub/DefTECH SM450/C1CC/Pro80/Sony BPX37 BD/Magnavox515HTPC-CPU: I3 550, 3.2 GHz/Mobo: Intel H57/RAM: 6GB DDR3 1333/HDD: 1TB/2TB Internal, 1TB external/Tuner: 1600-950 Haupague/W7 64 OS Remote: Harmony 700
stevethebrain is offline  
Reply Home Theater Computers

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off