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post #1 of 24 Old 05-11-2014, 07:59 PM - Thread Starter
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NeoCities slows the FCC's Internet connection down to dial-up speeds
There's a lot of back and forth going on in regards to net neutrality and new rules proposed by Federal Communications Commission (FCC) chairman Tom Wheeler, who also happens to be a former lobbyist for cable and wireless companies. To show its opposition to the proposal, which is scheduled for a vote on May 15, 2014, web host NeoCities managed to throttle the FCC's connection to its website down to dial-up era speeds.

In a rather angrily written blog post, NeoCities creator Kyle Drake referred to Wheeler as the "bonehead responsible for this idiotic and insane proposal," and said "the FCC isn't doing their job of protecting American consumers." Rather than stop there, he neutered the FCC's connection and created "The Ferengi Plan," which for $1,000 per year he'll happily remove the 28.8kbps modem throttle.

"Since the FCC seems to have no problem with this idea, I've (through correspondence) gotten access to the FCC's internal IP block, and throttled all connections from the FCC to 28.8kbps modem speeds on the Neocities.org front site, and I'm not removing it until the FCC pays us for the bandwidth they've been wasting instead of doing their jobs protecting us from the 'keep America's internet slow and expensive forever' lobby," Drake wrote.

While this is likely to have limited effect, Drake went the extra mile by posting the throttling code they're using on GitHub. Game on, in other words.

"It's time for the web to organize and stand up against these thugs before they ruin everything that the web stands for," Drake said.

http://www.maximumpc.com/neocitiesthrottles_fcc_down_288kbps_opposition_proposed_net_neutrality_rules

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post #2 of 24 Old 05-11-2014, 08:49 PM
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I have no idea who these people are, but I love them nonetheless.
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post #3 of 24 Old 05-11-2014, 08:56 PM
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What a brilliant move!
Forgot Wheeler was a former/current lobbyist for the cable industry.
Talk about the inmates running the asylum.

http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/johncassidy/2013/05/tom--wheeler-federal-communications-commission.html
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post #4 of 24 Old 05-11-2014, 11:01 PM
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Good stuff. There was a petition to remove Wheeler as the chairman of the FCC. I will link it here. Please sign it and send it to all your friends.
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post #5 of 24 Old 05-11-2014, 11:02 PM
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post #6 of 24 Old 05-12-2014, 01:22 PM - Thread Starter
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Nice!

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post #7 of 24 Old 05-12-2014, 05:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

NeoCities slows the FCC's Internet connection down to dial-up speeds
There's a lot of back and forth going on in regards to net neutrality and new rules proposed by Federal Communications Commission (FCC) chairman Tom Wheeler, who also happens to be a former lobbyist for cable and wireless companies. To show its opposition to the proposal, which is scheduled for a vote on May 15, 2014, web host NeoCities managed to throttle the FCC's connection to its website down to dial-up era speeds.

In a rather angrily written blog post, NeoCities creator Kyle Drake referred to Wheeler as the "bonehead responsible for this idiotic and insane proposal," and said "the FCC isn't doing their job of protecting American consumers." Rather than stop there, he neutered the FCC's connection and created "The Ferengi Plan," which for $1,000 per year he'll happily remove the 28.8kbps modem throttle.

"Since the FCC seems to have no problem with this idea, I've (through correspondence) gotten access to the FCC's internal IP block, and throttled all connections from the FCC to 28.8kbps modem speeds on the Neocities.org front site, and I'm not removing it until the FCC pays us for the bandwidth they've been wasting instead of doing their jobs protecting us from the 'keep America's internet slow and expensive forever' lobby," Drake wrote.

While this is likely to have limited effect, Drake went the extra mile by posting the throttling code they're using on GitHub. Game on, in other words.

"It's time for the web to organize and stand up against these thugs before they ruin everything that the web stands for," Drake said.

http://www.maximumpc.com/neocitiesthrottles_fcc_down_288kbps_opposition_proposed_net_neutrality_rules

 

Serves those bastards right lol.

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post #8 of 24 Old 05-12-2014, 06:07 PM
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That whitehouse.gov petition needs more signatures. Reddit, tweet, facebook, etc

Fantastic links, not enough thumbs up to give smile.gif

http://www.reddit.com/r/technology/comments/17y3d1/cable_companies_make_97_margin_on_internet/
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post #9 of 24 Old 05-12-2014, 07:03 PM - Thread Starter
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The problem is most people are too lazy to do anything about it

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post #10 of 24 Old 05-12-2014, 08:03 PM
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Petitions like this and from change.org do have some influence I think. Especially in the political sphere, if it gets enough signatures to make it's way into primetime news, etc

Supposedly the Veronica Mars movie was "brought back" after the series was cancelled because of their supporters change.org petition

Family Guy was cancelled for ages until Fox had enough of it's supporters requests and brought it back smile.gif

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post #11 of 24 Old 05-13-2014, 12:37 AM
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I fail to see how this does anything more than cause a few "articles" to be written (if Internet news posts can even be called articles). And they would likely mostly be limited to technical sections of publications.
They slowed access to their own web site. They did nothing to the FCC's Internet access. If the FCC spends much time perusing NeoCities, I guess they'll be hurting.

I'd be amazed that a former lobbyist for the cable co's (who's likely still receiving some kind of favoritism) can head the FCC, but I'm over 15.
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post #12 of 24 Old 05-13-2014, 01:46 PM - Thread Starter
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It just makes no sense to neuter internet speed and charge a random to remove it.

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post #13 of 24 Old 05-15-2014, 09:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

It just makes no sense to neuter internet speed and charge a random to remove it.

If you're taking about why they do it, I think the simplest explanation is probably the correct explaination: because they can get away with it. Look at how long cell phone cos have been getting away with ETF's, while the rest of the world just buys their phones outright. Same thing with cable packages. We let them.

Netflix bitches about being made to pay a fee, then turns around and increases their subscription fee. Last time thay did that they suffered a mass exodus. This time? Comcast is the bad guy.

After someone figured out how to make people pay for water (water!) all bets were off.

As for charging a random company, it was a test case.
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post #14 of 24 Old 05-16-2014, 07:39 AM - Thread Starter
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“Fast Lanes” proposal open for discussion
The Federal Communications Commission has voted in favor to release the “fast lanes” proposal, and open it up for public comment, that would allow ISP providers, such as Comcast, to charge web sites, for example Netflix, an additional fee to prioritize traffic. The plan was approved Thursday in a three-to-two vote to open up debate on the proposed changes to the net neutrality rules.

Prior to the vote, FCC chairman Tom Wheeler said, “I strongly support an open, fast, and robust internet. This agency supports an open internet. There is one Internet. Not a fast internet, not a slow internet; one internet.”

While Wheeler talked about an open internet, it appears he seems determined to go through with the proposal that many believe is a threat to the internet's openness as he continued, “Nothing in this proposal authorizes paid prioritization despite what has been incorrectly stated today. The potential for there to be some kind of a fast lane available to only a few has many people concerned. Personally, I don't like the idea that the Internet could be divided into haves and have-nots and I will work to see that that does not happen. In this item we have specifically asked whether and how to prevent the kind of paid prioritization that could result in fast lanes."

Opposition to the “fast lanes” proposal has been loud and numerous since it was revealed back in April with thousands of emails being sent, petitions started, and concerned citizens camping outside the building trying to get their message across. Web host NeoCities even went so far as to throttle the FCC’s internet connection to its website down to dial-up speeds.

The plan is not a final ruling and will be open for the public to leave their comments up until September 10 so that the FCC can hear the arguments for and against it.

http://www.maximumpc.com/fcc_votes_consider_paid_priority_internet_2014

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post #15 of 24 Old 05-16-2014, 08:00 AM
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So, for argument's sake, a "neutral net" is one where ISPs are regulated against managing the traffic on their networks and charging content providers that use more bandwidth a higher price. Yet, you and I, the subscriber, it's no problem that they charge us more for a faster connection. Interesting mindset. If Comcast (or whoever) offers a premium service and services like Netflix use it and in return I get a better Netflix experience, why is that an issue? It might even encourage ISPs to invest again in their infrastructure so they can grab more of these high-paying customers.

 

 

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post #16 of 24 Old 05-16-2014, 08:54 AM - Thread Starter
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I viewed it opposite, I assumed that if paying companies got preferential treatment it would alleviate any pressure from the public or diminish consumer demand for faster internet or additional internet investment and performance of the ISP.

I saw a slow internet but fast mega sites like netflix or Facebook or iTunes or google ....

If a few sites get special treatment and it reduces complaints of slow internet performance then what incentive does ISO have to improve infrastructure ? Wouldn't they rather just charge a random for preferential treatment ? Which servers to further degrade everything else.

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post #17 of 24 Old 05-16-2014, 09:23 AM - Thread Starter
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I meant *ransom as in charge a ransom for more speed. The entire internet should be fast IMO - if it's too slow make it faster.

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post #18 of 24 Old 05-16-2014, 03:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StardogChampion View Post

So, for argument's sake, a "neutral net" is one where ISPs are regulated against managing the traffic on their networks and charging content providers that use more bandwidth a higher price.
That isn't really what's happening, though. If ISPs are allowed to create so-called "fast lanes", they are essentially allowed to deliberately cripple speeds of companies that don't pay. It isn't about traffic management.
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Originally Posted by StardogChampion View Post

If Comcast (or whoever) offers a premium service and services like Netflix use it and in return I get a better Netflix experience, why is that an issue?

It creates bias against smaller companies that can't afford to pay the extra fees, and it reduces competition, thus leading to inflated prices. If Comcast can throttle other companies, Comcast can cripple the experience you will get when trying to watch videos on its competitors' services while making videos on its in-house VOD service perform properly. That encourages people to only use Comcast's services, because the experience with its competitors' services is so poor.

It also opens the door to ISPs exerting undue influence over other arenas, such as politics. For example, suppose Comcast has a vested interest in seeing a particular politician get elected, so they allow you to access that politician's website normally, but "for some reason" the website of the politician who doesn't serve Comcast's interests takes forever to load. ISPs are almost as important as electric utilities in enabling people to connect with the outside world, obtain information, and participate in the political process; giving them the freedom to pick and choose which online services work properly gives them huge influence over a variety of issues they should have no control over.

It would be like the Post Office deciding that it liked Target but not Walmart, so buying a movie from Target would cost $3 to ship, while buying a movie from Walmart would cost $30 to ship. The Post Office isn't allowed to discriminate against different companies by using different pricing schemes, but eliminating net neutrality will allow ISPs to do just that.
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post #19 of 24 Old 05-16-2014, 03:55 PM - Thread Starter
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That isn't really what's happening, though. If ISPs are allowed to create so-called "fast lanes", they are essentially allowed to deliberately cripple speeds of companies that don't pay. It isn't about traffic management.
It creates bias against smaller companies that can't afford to pay the extra fees, and it reduces competition, thus leading to inflated prices. If Comcast can throttle other companies, Comcast can cripple the experience you will get when trying to watch videos on its competitors' services while making videos on its in-house VOD service perform properly. That encourages people to only use Comcast's services, because the experience with its competitors' services is so poor.

It also opens the door to ISPs exerting undue influence over other arenas, such as politics. For example, suppose Comcast has a vested interest in seeing a particular politician get elected, so they allow you to access that politician's website normally, but "for some reason" the website of the politician who doesn't serve Comcast's interests takes forever to load. ISPs are almost as important as electric utilities in enabling people to connect with the outside world, obtain information, and participate in the political process; giving them the freedom to pick and choose which online services work properly gives them huge influence over a variety of issues they should have no control over.

It would be like the Post Office deciding that it liked Target but not Walmart, so buying a movie from Target would cost $3 to ship, while buying a movie from Walmart would cost $30 to ship. The Post Office isn't allowed to discriminate against different companies by using different pricing schemes, but eliminating net neutrality will allow ISPs to do just that.

Well said.

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post #20 of 24 Old 05-20-2014, 07:14 AM - Thread Starter
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http://www.avsforum.com/t/1532490/fcc-tries-again-to-establish-open-internet-rules/0_100

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post #21 of 24 Old 05-20-2014, 09:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StardogChampion View Post

So, for argument's sake, a "neutral net" is one where ISPs are regulated against managing the traffic on their networks and charging content providers that use more bandwidth a higher price. Yet, you and I, the subscriber, it's no problem that they charge us more for a faster connection. Interesting mindset. If Comcast (or whoever) offers a premium service and services like Netflix use it and in return I get a better Netflix experience, why is that an issue? It might even encourage ISPs to invest again in their infrastructure so they can grab more of these high-paying customers.

It's an issue because letting carriers freely price-discriminate has turned out poorly in the past. In the US, we went through this with canal, railroad, and telephone networks. It has consistently been more lucrative for the dominant companies to monopolize a small pie than to share a piece of a larger pie. The benefits of reinvesting in more infrastructure get overshadowed by the benefits of erecting barriers to competition, so the big players have no incentive to cooperate.

When the government has enforced a level playing field in this scenario, it has had a tendency to bring a wave of market expansion and technology advancement.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gibbons_v._Ogden
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hepburn_Act
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bell_System_divestiture
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post #22 of 24 Old 05-20-2014, 10:57 AM - Thread Starter
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Well said ^

I quoted you in the main page article FYI. I agree.

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post #23 of 24 Old 05-20-2014, 02:08 PM
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Great responses. It will really help anyone who comes across this forum understand the issues and that this isn't just another anti-corporate "Occupy" thing.

 

 

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post #24 of 24 Old 05-22-2014, 09:25 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StardogChampion View Post

Great responses. It will really help anyone who comes across this forum understand the issues and that this isn't just another anti-corporate "Occupy" thing.

There is another newer thread on these topics after I posted this on the AVS main page.

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1532490/fcc-tries-again-to-establish-open-internet-rules/0_100

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