Fiber or Cat6 network - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 6Likes
  • 1 Post By mcturkey
  • 1 Post By blueiedgod
  • 1 Post By balky
  • 1 Post By ajhieb
  • 1 Post By kapone
  • 1 Post By RobNY
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 28 Old 08-10-2014, 11:45 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 61
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 53 Post(s)
Liked: 0
Fiber or Cat6 network

Hey guys. So I may be buying a house sooner than I thought after all. Thats IF all my Military cards fall right. My question is should I run a Cat6 network or should I run a fiber backbone network and then upgrade as I go from there or is fiber overkill?
My premise is my whole house will be wired for full network Media Server access. At first it will be Apple T.V.s or something along those lines but each device will slowly get upgraded to an actual HTPC. We are even going to have a T.V. in our master bathroom. Plus at this point we will probably be going the cable card route for cable television if we have not by then already.
With all this networking I cant make up my mind on whether I should do fiber or Cat6 cable. Who thinks fiber is overkill and not worth the cost and who thinks fiber is the way to go for full home networking?
(If it helps I can get the tools from work and I would totally do the install myself.)
Leon1972 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 28 Old 08-11-2014, 12:26 AM
AVS Special Member
 
ajhieb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,392
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 305 Post(s)
Liked: 386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leon1972 View Post
Hey guys. So I may be buying a house sooner than I thought after all. Thats IF all my Military cards fall right. My question is should I run a Cat6 network or should I run a fiber backbone network and then upgrade as I go from there or is fiber overkill?
My premise is my whole house will be wired for full network Media Server access. At first it will be Apple T.V.s or something along those lines but each device will slowly get upgraded to an actual HTPC. We are even going to have a T.V. in our master bathroom. Plus at this point we will probably be going the cable card route for cable television if we have not by then already.
With all this networking I cant make up my mind on whether I should do fiber or Cat6 cable. Who thinks fiber is overkill and not worth the cost and who thinks fiber is the way to go for full home networking?
(If it helps I can get the tools from work and I would totally do the install myself.)
Unless you get some really good deal on fiber, fiber nics, a fiber switch, and some fiber bridges for all of the non-compatible fiver devices on your network (AppleTV, Roku, etc) I'd suggest going with Cat6 as it will be much cheaper, and easier.

Every time I've wired I always did Cat6 (or 5 depending on the time) and a run of RG-6 Quad shield. If the existing coax is in decent shape you can skip the RG-6, but if I'm going to the trouble of running cable anyway, I typically do the RG-6 too. (And that will keep all of your cable boxes working well until you migrate to using HTPCs.

Congrats on the (possible) good news. Good luck with the new home!

RAID protection is only for failed drives. That's it. It's no replacement for a proper backup.
ajhieb is online now  
post #3 of 28 Old 08-11-2014, 03:24 AM
Advanced Member
 
tman247's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: UK
Posts: 863
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Liked: 29
Don't bother with fibre in the house. Not worth it at all. Stick with CAT6a, and you're pretty much future proofed to 10G and possibly beyond.
tman247 is online now  
post #4 of 28 Old 08-11-2014, 04:02 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 61
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 53 Post(s)
Liked: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajhieb View Post
Unless you get some really good deal on fiber, fiber nics, a fiber switch, and some fiber bridges for all of the non-compatible fiver devices on your network (AppleTV, Roku, etc) I'd suggest going with Cat6 as it will be much cheaper, and easier.

Every time I've wired I always did Cat6 (or 5 depending on the time) and a run of RG-6 Quad shield. If the existing coax is in decent shape you can skip the RG-6, but if I'm going to the trouble of running cable anyway, I typically do the RG-6 too. (And that will keep all of your cable boxes working well until you migrate to using HTPCs.

Congrats on the (possible) good news. Good luck with the new home!
Fiber and starting equipment only about 1500. That's not bad.
He'll, I MAY be able to get the fiber for free. EVEN BETTER!!!! Lol
Leon1972 is offline  
post #5 of 28 Old 08-11-2014, 04:07 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 61
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 53 Post(s)
Liked: 0
Fiber nics are only 150 each. But a switch is only 70. Put one of those in each room for now and I'm set. I still get the fiber speed through the backbone the slowdown would only be from the switch to each device but there would be zero slowdown through the big picture.
I would be running data through five bedrooms, a living room, a den, bathroom, basement, great room. That is a lot of possible data running at once. That's why I'm thinking a fiber backbone that can be built on.
No question if I can acquire fiber for free and tools to borrow from work.
Leon1972 is offline  
post #6 of 28 Old 08-11-2014, 04:21 AM
AVS Special Member
 
ajhieb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,392
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 305 Post(s)
Liked: 386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leon1972 View Post
Fiber nics are only 150 each. But a switch is only 70. Put one of those in each room for now and I'm set. I still get the fiber speed through the backbone the slowdown would only be from the switch to each device but there would be zero slowdown through the big picture.
I would be running data through five bedrooms, a living room, a den, bathroom, basement, great room. That is a lot of possible data running at once. That's why I'm thinking a fiber backbone that can be built on.
No question if I can acquire fiber for free and tools to borrow from work.
What Nics and switch are you looking at? $70 for 10G Fiber switch sounds too good to be true.

RAID protection is only for failed drives. That's it. It's no replacement for a proper backup.
ajhieb is online now  
post #7 of 28 Old 08-11-2014, 04:37 AM
Senior Member
 
mcturkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 343
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leon1972 View Post
Hey guys. So I may be buying a house sooner than I thought after all. Thats IF all my Military cards fall right. My question is should I run a Cat6 network or should I run a fiber backbone network and then upgrade as I go from there or is fiber overkill?
My premise is my whole house will be wired for full network Media Server access. At first it will be Apple T.V.s or something along those lines but each device will slowly get upgraded to an actual HTPC. We are even going to have a T.V. in our master bathroom. Plus at this point we will probably be going the cable card route for cable television if we have not by then already.
With all this networking I cant make up my mind on whether I should do fiber or Cat6 cable. Who thinks fiber is overkill and not worth the cost and who thinks fiber is the way to go for full home networking?
(If it helps I can get the tools from work and I would totally do the install myself.)
If you're building, run conduit, as that's the only future proof option. If you're retrofitting an existing home, I'd go with Cat6. Aside from cost, the problem with fiber is that while it's easy enough to add a fiber NIC to a PC, there are plenty of other devices that can connect to a home network that can't be upgraded/changed from an RJ45 ethernet port. Unless you're willing to live with WiFi connections, or having a separate switch in any areas where you are using those devices, I'd really suggest sticking to Cat6.
ajhieb likes this.
mcturkey is offline  
post #8 of 28 Old 08-11-2014, 06:51 AM
Advanced Member
 
balky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 844
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 48 Post(s)
Liked: 50
For a home network consisting of TV's, Roku's, ATVs, HTPCs... etc... I think a fiber network is quite an overkill...

Cat6 cabling is more than sufficient for most of the IP traffic that will be generated by your devices...

If you're thinking about (over) protecting the main server, you could put a dual port NIC and set up link aggregation between the server and the central switch...
This is known as LAGG in FreeNAS... NIC teaming in Windows... etc...

If you have switch - switch (uplink) connections, you could also double those...

For the each of the devices, you will barely ever see more than 40% utilization on the 1Gb/s switch port connecting it...
balky is offline  
post #9 of 28 Old 08-11-2014, 07:03 AM
Senior Member
 
EnjoyingMyRide's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 212
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Liked: 18
I have used Cat6. I bought a new 2014 Samsung LED Smart TV, I was shocked when I read Samsung recommended Cat7 in the manual! Cat6 works just fine.

You may be interested in:

http://www.itproportal.com/2014/07/0...oadband-costs/

10x faster than Google Fiber for 30 meters using copper lines. . .

Steve

Last edited by EnjoyingMyRide; 08-11-2014 at 07:09 AM. Reason: Update
EnjoyingMyRide is offline  
post #10 of 28 Old 08-11-2014, 07:25 AM
AVS Special Member
 
blueiedgod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Amherst, NY
Posts: 1,551
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 76 Post(s)
Liked: 68
I would like to know where Leon is getting his Fiber equipment pricing. 10G switch for Cat6a is like $10,000, and NIC's are $3000. I would expect Fiber equipment to be even more expensive.

Cat5e/Cat6 is all that is needed for a house. We have Cat5e, 6 TV's, 12 tunes, and when it is all running at the same time, we barely reach 300 Mbps on the switch (30% utilization).

Even if 4K makes it into our house, and doubles our throughput, we are still going to be at 600 Mbps (60% of network utilization).

Also, when the time comes to sell the house, no one is going to pay more for having Fiber vs Ethernet. Most expect to have Coax, and even that does not make someone pay more for the house.
Dark_Slayer likes this.

6 TV's in the house on FiOS and we only pay $4.99/month to connect them all!!! Power to the CableCard and WMC7!!!
blueiedgod is offline  
post #11 of 28 Old 08-11-2014, 07:25 AM
Advanced Member
 
balky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 844
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 48 Post(s)
Liked: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnjoyingMyRide View Post
I have used Cat6. I bought a new 2014 Samsung LED Smart TV, I was shocked when I read Samsung recommended Cat7 in the manual! Cat6 works just fine.

You may be interested in:

http://www.itproportal.com/2014/07/0...oadband-costs/

10x faster than Google Fiber for 30 meters using copper lines. . .
The Samsung recommendation is very very strange...
Cat7 is majorly designed / aimed for 10Gb/s networks, and unless the Samsung TV has a 10Gb NIC on it, Cat7 will be a waste...

All other switches and devices also need to support 10Gb/s...

10Gb/s in a home network?... nice to have if you have the money...
balky is offline  
post #12 of 28 Old 08-11-2014, 08:00 AM
Senior Member
 
EnjoyingMyRide's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 212
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Liked: 18
^ +1

Yup, like I said Cat6 works just fine. You did a fine job of listing some of the limiting factors that would need to be addressed. You just don't install Cat7 and suddenly reap insane speeds!

Steve
EnjoyingMyRide is offline  
post #13 of 28 Old 08-11-2014, 05:11 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 61
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 53 Post(s)
Liked: 0
What about speed drop off from longer distances? That was a big reason I was thinking of running the backbone in fiber and then at each point just drop a 70$ fiber in cat out switch.
Guess looking drop dead tired doesnt help. those were patch panels that I was seeing at 150. lol.
Leon1972 is offline  
post #14 of 28 Old 08-11-2014, 06:40 PM
AVS Special Member
 
ajhieb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,392
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 305 Post(s)
Liked: 386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leon1972 View Post
What about speed drop off from longer distances? That was a big reason I was thinking of running the backbone in fiber and then at each point just drop a 70$ fiber in cat out switch.
Guess looking drop dead tired doesnt help. those were patch panels that I was seeing at 150. lol.
What speed were you planning on having for your backbone? 1Gb? 10Gb? What distances are you going to be dealing with?

If you can find a decent switch that has a fiber port, for $70, to use at the various locations throughout your new home, that's great, but you can't really do that at both ends of the fiber. (I guess you could but having 10 switches connected to one another in the same location is a rather clumsy solution) The "proper" alternative to that is to just use an all fiber switch, and those are typically thousands of dollars.

RAID protection is only for failed drives. That's it. It's no replacement for a proper backup.
ajhieb is online now  
post #15 of 28 Old 08-12-2014, 01:17 AM
Advanced Member
 
balky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 844
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 48 Post(s)
Liked: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajhieb View Post
What speed were you planning on having for your backbone? 1Gb? 10Gb? What distances are you going to be dealing with?

If you can find a decent switch that has a fiber port, for $70,
Does this exist?

Unless you're meaning an intelligent web managed Gb switch with SFP uplink ports... I believe they usually cost more than $70...

This is the switch I use at home for the core of my home network... http://www.planet.com.tw/en/product/...t.php?id=25554
The internet (DSL) Cisco router takes up one port, the FreeNAS server takes up two ports in a LACP setup, and the rest of the house is cabled Cat5 directly to the switch,
I have used this one http://www.planet.com.tw/en/product/...t.php?id=12194 in the newly setup room in the attic...

If you have lesser than 100m cable length between an end-point device (HTPC, ATV... etc...) and the main switch you're pretty much in good shape with Cat 5/5e/6 cabling... this is assuming you cable all your RJ-45 outlets directly to the main switch,

If you live in a mansion, you most likely can't be bothered or have any financial concerns with running fiber all over the place

IMO, having a 10Gb backbone network in a home environment is a really sweet thing to talk about, but in reality adds no value to user experience...
The only area where I can see any benefit is in doing large (at least > 1TB) file transfer, in which case you need to have a 10Gb NIC on each endpoint involved in the file transfer...
Apart from this, the rest is mostly cosmetic...
ajhieb likes this.
balky is offline  
post #16 of 28 Old 08-12-2014, 01:37 AM
AVS Special Member
 
ajhieb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,392
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 305 Post(s)
Liked: 386
Quote:
Originally Posted by balky View Post
Does this exist?
Well, that's kinda the point I was getting at. $70 was the number the OP listed for a fiber switch. No, I don't think that is a realistic number.

I think if you look around you can get older 1GB fiber stuff for vaguely reasonable prices but that isn't going to bring any improvement on speed, over Cat6 and unless the house is huge (as you pointed out) the cable length isn't going to be a factor.

10GB Fiber equipment is pricey, not to mention it's going to make a home installation needlessly complex. Even if I could get the entire project done for the same price as running cat6, I still wouldn't do fiber in the home.
balky likes this.

RAID protection is only for failed drives. That's it. It's no replacement for a proper backup.
ajhieb is online now  
post #17 of 28 Old 08-12-2014, 04:39 AM
AVS Special Member
 
kapone's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 4,417
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 77 Post(s)
Liked: 117
Well, I guess I'll be the lone dissenter..

I actually think running fiber is a great idea, with some caveats.

Running wire throughout a house is an expensive proposition. It's not always feasible to run conduit, especially with a house that's already built, and running conduit is even more expensive. Cost of wire is cheap, relatively speaking. And once you run wire in wall, it's going to stay there for a long time.

If all else permits, I don't see why running fiber is a bad idea, IF you're taking on a wire renovation project. It may not be useful today, but I can promise you, it will be, in the future. Forget file transfers, think "streams", as in HD and beyond, uncompressed streams. Think what you could do, if you could sling uncompressed AV streams around the house...

That being said, I'd never fiber only. As others have said, running CAT cable as well is almost a requirement. You can use that CAT cable today and as technology permits, transition over to using the fiber. I can see lots of potential in having a high speed/bandwidth backbone that runs to every room in the house. Think automated voice recognition, kinect like camera sensors, heat sensors, etc etc all hooked into a central place, and controlling various aspects of the house.

We're building a new house as we speak, and I did the same (and then some, I guess). I'm running fiber (and a couple of CAT6 and a few other cables) to almost every room in the house, including bathrooms, garages, attic, you name it. Yes, the cost ended up not being trivial per se, but I think in the long run, it'll pay for itself. Houses tend to last a long time...
kapone is offline  
post #18 of 28 Old 08-12-2014, 04:54 AM
AVS Special Member
 
ajhieb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,392
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 305 Post(s)
Liked: 386
Quote:
Originally Posted by kapone View Post
Well, I guess I'll be the lone dissenter..

I actually think running fiber is a great idea, with some caveats.

Running wire throughout a house is an expensive proposition. It's not always feasible to run conduit, especially with a house that's already built, and running conduit is even more expensive. Cost of wire is cheap, relatively speaking. And once you run wire in wall, it's going to stay there for a long time.

If all else permits, I don't see why running fiber is a bad idea, IF you're taking on a wire renovation project. It may not be useful today, but I can promise you, it will be, in the future. Forget file transfers, think "streams", as in HD and beyond, uncompressed streams. Think what you could do, if you could sling uncompressed AV streams around the house...

That being said, I'd never fiber only. As others have said, running CAT cable as well is almost a requirement. You can use that CAT cable today and as technology permits, transition over to using the fiber. I can see lots of potential in having a high speed/bandwidth backbone that runs to every room in the house. Think automated voice recognition, kinect like camera sensors, heat sensors, etc etc all hooked into a central place, and controlling various aspects of the house.

We're building a new house as we speak, and I did the same (and then some, I guess). I'm running fiber (and a couple of CAT6 and a few other cables) to almost every room in the house, including bathrooms, garages, attic, you name it. Yes, the cost ended up not being trivial per se, but I think in the long run, it'll pay for itself. Houses tend to last a long time...
Yeah, that's a fair point that if you run both and utilize the copper now and have the fiber in place for later, that's a decent proposition. (again, assuming money is no object)

But I stand by my statement that I wouldn't want to rely on fiber in my home right now. With so many devices unable to utilize it, it makes a lot of aspects needlessly complex and adds several points of failure. It's been a few years since I've worked with fiber, (FDDI) but last time I did it was much more fussy than copper. I'm just not a fan.

And don't get me wrong... I think you do "go for the gusto" better than most around here, and you generally don't make compromises in your builds (I'm still in awe of your E38 build) but I'm not sure I'm onboard with the potential for throwing around uncompressed video streams. I can't think of a scenario where I'll have access to uncompressed HD streams of external content. I can't think of a purpose for slinging around any uncompressed HD streams from any content I've created. And I'm pretty sure they already have much cheaper cable tHat can hanDle uncoMpressed vIdeo streams, right now.

Oh, and FWIW, my old boss ran fiber in his house when he built it back in '99. He was certain it was going to be the thing to have in a few years. We still keep in touch. He's still never used it.

RAID protection is only for failed drives. That's it. It's no replacement for a proper backup.
ajhieb is online now  
post #19 of 28 Old 08-12-2014, 05:07 AM
AVS Special Member
 
kapone's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 4,417
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 77 Post(s)
Liked: 117
Not disagreeing, we're on the same page. But, since I was running a whole bunch of cables everywhere anyway, adding two strands of fiber everywhere was only a few thousand more. (disclaimer: I have lots of contacts in the tech industry and can generally get discounted pricing on a lot of things).

As you said, I'm pretty sure as well, that I won't be using that fiber anytime soon. However.... (and I'm putting my futurist hat on ) think holographic displays, ceiling mounted 3D laser projectors etc etc. Yes, you're right that an uncompressed stream is probably unnecessary, but I was being glib, when I used that term. We're already hitting the limits of HDMI with 4K displays at 60Hz, and it is necessitating HDMI 2.0. Who knows what the future will bring and what kind of bandwidth you'll need?

p.s. If and when I sell this house, trust me, I can spin that backbone into a selling point, like nobody's business..
ajhieb likes this.
kapone is offline  
post #20 of 28 Old 08-12-2014, 06:00 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 61
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 53 Post(s)
Liked: 0
So I think I will just run cat6. If I find a use for fiber in my time I'll run that then. Chances are if I gains more commercial use and popularity it may be cheaper then. I'll just try to run conduit without completely tearing up the walls when I run the cat. I'm in the military (commo running is my job) so I'm used to getting tasks that we think are impossible till we figure it out. Lol

Thanks for all the advice guys!!!
Leon1972 is offline  
post #21 of 28 Old 08-12-2014, 06:36 AM
Advanced Member
 
balky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 844
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 48 Post(s)
Liked: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by kapone View Post
Not disagreeing, we're on the same page. But, since I was running a whole bunch of cables everywhere anyway, adding two strands of fiber everywhere was only a few thousand more. (disclaimer: I have lots of contacts in the tech industry and can generally get discounted pricing on a lot of things).

As you said, I'm pretty sure as well, that I won't be using that fiber anytime soon. However.... (and I'm putting my futurist hat on ) think holographic displays, ceiling mounted 3D laser projectors etc etc. Yes, you're right that an uncompressed stream is probably unnecessary, but I was being glib, when I used that term. We're already hitting the limits of HDMI with 4K displays at 60Hz, and it is necessitating HDMI 2.0. Who knows what the future will bring and what kind of bandwidth you'll need?

p.s. If and when I sell this house, trust me, I can spin that backbone into a selling point, like nobody's business..
I think I agree with you in a way, but we need to see as well that compression efficiency keeps getting better...
If we arrive at the situation where the 1Gb/s backbone will not be up to the task anymore, then it will not really matter if you have your 1Gb/s backbone on fiber or Cat 6... neither of the two will work...
Investing in a 10Gb/s fiber backbone in the home at the this time for future proofing the home network is IMO just a nice to have which probably will never get used...
balky is offline  
post #22 of 28 Old 08-12-2014, 08:18 AM
AVS Special Member
 
LexInVA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 1,931
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Liked: 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leon1972 View Post
Hey guys. So I may be buying a house sooner than I thought after all. Thats IF all my Military cards fall right. My question is should I run a Cat6 network or should I run a fiber backbone network and then upgrade as I go from there or is fiber overkill?
My premise is my whole house will be wired for full network Media Server access. At first it will be Apple T.V.s or something along those lines but each device will slowly get upgraded to an actual HTPC. We are even going to have a T.V. in our master bathroom. Plus at this point we will probably be going the cable card route for cable television if we have not by then already.
With all this networking I cant make up my mind on whether I should do fiber or Cat6 cable. Who thinks fiber is overkill and not worth the cost and who thinks fiber is the way to go for full home networking?
(If it helps I can get the tools from work and I would totally do the install myself.)
Fibre is overkill. The infrastructure costs are immense unless you get your hands on a bunch of older low-grade gear, which won't be worth the money. Use high-grade Cat6/Cat7 Ethernet cabling with business/enterprise-class hardware, and you'll get all the performance you need.
LexInVA is offline  
post #23 of 28 Old 08-12-2014, 09:08 AM
Senior Member
 
mcturkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 343
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by balky View Post
I think I agree with you in a way, but we need to see as well that compression efficiency keeps getting better...
If we arrive at the situation where the 1Gb/s backbone will not be up to the task anymore, then it will not really matter if you have your 1Gb/s backbone on fiber or Cat 6... neither of the two will work...
Investing in a 10Gb/s fiber backbone in the home at the this time for future proofing the home network is IMO just a nice to have which probably will never get used...
It should be pointed out that you can easily run 10GbE over Cat6a for sub-100m distances (55m for Cat6), so in terms of a "backbone" that distributes out to other 1GbE runs throughout a home, it's still plenty capable. So when 10GbE switches finally come down in price (they are starting to now, and should drop a lot more in the next couple of years), that's a pretty reasonable option.
mcturkey is offline  
post #24 of 28 Old 08-12-2014, 09:29 AM
AVS Special Member
 
blueiedgod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Amherst, NY
Posts: 1,551
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 76 Post(s)
Liked: 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by kapone View Post
Running wire throughout a house is an expensive proposition. It's not always feasible to run conduit, especially with a house that's already built, and running conduit is even more expensive.
Running conduit in an existing structure is no different, in fact easier than replacing pipes. And pipes get replaced on the regular basis.

If your house has forced heating and cooling, conduit from the basement into the attic can be installed in the existing return duct.

If your house has a central chimney, conduit can be run right along side.

Having wired 2 of my own houses, I can tell you that a $60 1000 ft spool of Cat5e goes a long way. And we are not talking tiny houses, they are over 3,000 ft² colonials.

Figure it will cost about $100 in materials (wire, wall plates, keystone jacks, crimp terminations) and a good portion of a weekend to accomplish.

First floor rooms get wired from the basement up to wall plates. Second floor rooms get wired from the attic down to the wall plates. Wires go from basement to the attic through conduit installed in the HVAC return (one house) and conduit installed along the chimney (not used since switching to High Efficiency HVAC system) in another house.

The cost of equipment is $10 for crimp tool for connectors, and $10 fish tape to pull the wires through.

6 TV's in the house on FiOS and we only pay $4.99/month to connect them all!!! Power to the CableCard and WMC7!!!
blueiedgod is offline  
post #25 of 28 Old 08-12-2014, 11:36 AM
Advanced Member
 
balky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 844
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 48 Post(s)
Liked: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcturkey View Post
It should be pointed out that you can easily run 10GbE over Cat6a for sub-100m distances (55m for Cat6), so in terms of a "backbone" that distributes out to other 1GbE runs throughout a home, it's still plenty capable. So when 10GbE switches finally come down in price (they are starting to now, and should drop a lot more in the next couple of years), that's a pretty reasonable option.
Yes, you're absolutely correct...
The only other interesting thing to look out for will be power consumption and heat that will be generated by the models of 10Gb switches released at that point in time in the future...
balky is offline  
post #26 of 28 Old 08-12-2014, 01:12 PM
AVS Special Member
 
LexInVA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 1,931
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Liked: 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by tman247 View Post
Don't bother with fibre in the house. Not worth it at all. Stick with CAT6a, and you're pretty much future proofed to 10G and possibly beyond.

Indeed. The latest 10 Gigabit Ethernet switches are very economical compared to their fibre counterparts and will provide all the bandwidth needed with current Cat6/7 cabling.
LexInVA is offline  
post #27 of 28 Old 08-13-2014, 06:41 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 137
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 84 Post(s)
Liked: 22
If money is no object or you get the stuff for super cheap, run both Cat7 and Fiber at the same time that way you will be prepared for most eventualities. If money is tighter, Cat6 is the best choice. Always run two cables to each location, though, since running two at once is almost as easy as running one and then you have an installed spare.
htpcforever is offline  
post #28 of 28 Old 08-13-2014, 08:02 AM
Member
 
RobNY's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 87
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked: 14
Fiber is really only useful if you are planning on running very long distances. Do yourself a favor and stick with copper.
Sammy2 likes this.
RobNY is offline  
Reply Home Theater Computers

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off