Anyting from Computex on the UHD-BD-movie-playing front? - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 32 Old 06-01-2017, 09:56 AM - Thread Starter
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Anyting from Computex on the UHD-BD-movie-playing front?

Has anything whatsoever about laptop or desktop computer systems that, in addition to gaming and typical computer tasks, are designed to play commercial UHD-BD movies and, if so, what are they?

Thanks.
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post #2 of 32 Old 06-06-2017, 06:30 AM
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Originally Posted by Herve View Post
Has anything whatsoever about laptop or desktop computer systems that, in addition to gaming and typical computer tasks, are designed to play commercial UHD-BD movies and, if so, what are they?

Thanks.
OEMs have no options for UHD-BD drives at this time, so they are not part of the newly introduced products, some of which are shipping with older GPUs on the notebook side of things. Only a few drives - all of which appear to be the same product - are being sold in Asia and Pioneer doesn't actually make drives, so they can't offer anything in large quantities to anyone. LG is waiting on a UHD-BD certified optical drive chipset from MediaTek, who joined the licensee list in the last several months, so that is holding things up in getting drives out. Things just didn't come together in time for Computex, but it's possible that drives may be available by the Holiday sale season, when many of these new products will actually be available.
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post #3 of 32 Old 06-06-2017, 08:16 AM
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As much as I want my PC to do EVERYTHING for me.....I've given up on it as a 4k/Blu ray machine. Got an oppo 203 and it's working great.
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post #4 of 32 Old 06-06-2017, 02:32 PM
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As much as I want my PC to do EVERYTHING for me.....I've given up on it as a 4k/Blu ray machine. Got an oppo 203 and it's working great.
I agree. The hardware requirement is insane. And the greedy Cyberlink wants to charge $100 for PDVD, with possible costly "upgrade" every couple years. Standalone player is like $160. The PC playback of UHD bluray just does not make economical sense.
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post #5 of 32 Old 06-06-2017, 03:33 PM
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UHD PDVD is $200. Only the Ultra version does UHD-BD and it is currently on sale for $85, in order to drive sales in Asia, where they now have both internal and external drives available in most of Southeast Asia.
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post #6 of 32 Old 06-06-2017, 05:33 PM - Thread Starter
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Cyberlink says the following (with my added emphasis) in the "Mainboard" section on their specifications page ( http://www.cyberlink.com/support/faq...nt.do?id=19144 ):

"To output Ultra HD Blu-ray movies to an external display, the connection port embedded on the mainboard must support HDCP 2.2.
For laptop PCs, please refer to the specification of your laptop to see if the external display connection (HDMI/DisplayPort) supports HDCP 2.2 output."

I have two simple questions about the above quote.

1. On a Kaby laptop that has a "discrete", say GTX 1060 gpu, is the output HDMI "embedded on the mainboard"?

2. Is the aforementioned laptop, because of its discrete gpu, ineligible by default to play commercial UHD BD movie disks?

Thanks.
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post #7 of 32 Old 06-06-2017, 07:24 PM
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All the new notebooks with 1000-series GPUs meet the requirements when using an external UHD-BD-ROM drive. I'm not sure about the MX 150, the low-end version of the 1000-series for thin laptops. Right now, it's just a matter of the playback software and drivers being updated to work together. Nvidia will likely have that locked in by the end of Summer or some time in the Fall, as Asia has external drives available now, though I'm not sure how popular external drives would be in the Asian market outside of the obvious "I need to occasionally burn/read a disc!" usage. I really can't imagine someone lugging around a drive and using it constantly for entertainment purposes, but that's just me.
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post #8 of 32 Old 06-06-2017, 09:24 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by LexInVA View Post
All the new notebooks with 1000-series GPUs meet the requirements when using an external UHD-BD-ROM drive. I'm not sure about the MX 150, the low-end version of the 1000-series for thin laptops. Right now, it's just a matter of the playback software and drivers being updated to work together. Nvidia will likely have that locked in by the end of Summer or some time in the Fall, as Asia has external drives available now, though I'm not sure how popular external drives would be in the Asian market outside of the obvious "I need to occasionally burn/read a disc!" usage. I really can't imagine someone lugging around a drive and using it constantly for entertainment purposes, but that's just me.
Thanks, Lex. For people like me who have to buy some kind of new computer, regardless, that's good to know.

The desktop wanna-haves are being discriminated against, IMO, and the Cyberlink/UHD-BD requirements pretty much spell out why -- the display must be plugged into the HDMI embedded in the desktop's motherboard, at least when the user wants to play a commercial UHD-BD movie disk. Switching back and forth between the GPU's port and the mb port, etc., would be a royal PIA.

So for those who want to have some GPU power for games and 4k-file manipulation, as well the ability to stream 4K Netflix and Youtube and perform all the typical computer tasks, in addition to the ability to play those disks via external UHD-BD drive, it looks like a HDCP 2.2 laptop will fill the "all in one box" bill. Plus, the thing will be very portable. As everyone has already pointed out so well, the downside is its cost versus a well-equipped desktop for almost all tasks and an increasingly-less-expensive stand-alone UHD-BD player does the duty of playing the UHD-BD disks.
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post #9 of 32 Old 06-07-2017, 11:20 AM - Thread Starter
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In order for a Kaby HDCP 2.2 laptop (with say a discrete GTX 1060 gpu on board) to output commercial UHD-BD movies to an appropriate UHD display, does the display of the laptop itself have to be 4K native, or is a laptop having a less-expensive 1080-native display (typical on laptops with small displays) acceptable? More specifically, will the nVidia control panel on a 1080-display unit even allow the user to set 4K output to an external UHD display?

Thanks.
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post #10 of 32 Old 06-07-2017, 11:38 AM
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Note that it requires Intel HD630, which exclude all i5-7200U and i7-7500U CPU which are on most non-gaming laptops. Not sure HD620 would work.

From PowerDVD 17 Ultra UHD Bluray Playback Requirement:

[Ultra HD Blu-ray]
Intel 7th generation (Kaby Lake) Core i processors integrated with Intel HD Graphics 630, Intel Iris™ Graphics 640.

Ultra HD Blu-ray is supported only if a display is powered by Intel Graphics and supports HDCP 2.2. If your computer includes more than one graphics processor, Ultra HD Blu-ray is supported only on the display that is connected and powered by Intel Graphics.

[Ultra HD Blu-ray]
A mainboard is required which supports the Intel Software Guard Extensions (Intel SGX) technology. The Intel SGX feature needs to be enabled in the BIOS** settings and allocated with 128 MB or above memory space.

To output Ultra HD Blu-ray movies to an external display, the connection port embedded on the mainboard must support HDCP 2.2. For laptop PCs, please refer to the specification of your laptop to see if the external display connection (HDMI/DisplayPort) supports HDCP 2.2 output.

[Ultra HD Blu-ray]
Display device with HDMI 2.0a/DisplayPort 1.3 connection interface, and must support HDCP 2.2.
Screen resolution: Ultra HD resolution (3840 x 2160).

Display cable: HDMI 2.0a/DisplayPort 1.3 version cable without any adapters/splitters/repeaters.
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post #11 of 32 Old 06-07-2017, 05:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Herve View Post
In order for a Kaby HDCP 2.2 laptop (with say a discrete GTX 1060 gpu on board) to output commercial UHD-BD movies to an appropriate UHD display, does the display of the laptop itself have to be 4K native, or is a laptop having a less-expensive 1080-native display (typical on laptops with small displays) acceptable? More specifically, will the nVidia control panel on a 1080-display unit even allow the user to set 4K output to an external UHD display?

Thanks.
Embedded DisplayPort is what laptops use to put video signals on their displays and all the Kaby Lake laptops and AIOs use the latest version, which has HDCP 2.2 support. Display resolution means nothing and the GPU is capable of outputting a 4K signal via the external HDMI port or any external DisplayPort or even USB-C, which would simply work automatically if you connected a compatible display. There really is nothing to do except plug it in, select the external display for video playback, and get on your with your life.
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post #12 of 32 Old 06-07-2017, 07:32 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by LexInVA View Post
Embedded DisplayPort is what laptops use to put video signals on their displays and all the Kaby Lake laptops and AIOs use the latest version, which has HDCP 2.2 support. Display resolution means nothing and the GPU is capable of outputting a 4K signal via the external HDMI port or any external DisplayPort or even USB-C, which would simply work automatically if you connected a compatible display. There really is nothing to do except plug it in, select the external display for video playback, and get on your with your life.
Thanks!
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post #13 of 32 Old 06-08-2017, 07:19 AM - Thread Starter
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Note that it requires Intel HD630, which exclude all i5-7200U and i7-7500U CPU which are on most non-gaming laptops. Not sure HD620 would work.

From PowerDVD 17 Ultra UHD Bluray Playback Requirement:

[Ultra HD Blu-ray]
Intel 7th generation (Kaby Lake) Core i processors integrated with Intel HD Graphics 630, Intel Iris™ Graphics 640.

Ultra HD Blu-ray is supported only if a display is powered by Intel Graphics and supports HDCP 2.2.If your computer includes more than one graphics processor, Ultra HD Blu-ray is supported only on the display that is connected and powered by Intel Graphics.

[Ultra HD Blu-ray]
A mainboard is required which supports the Intel Software Guard Extensions (Intel SGX) technology. The Intel SGX feature needs to be enabled in the BIOS** settings and allocated with 128 MB or above memory space.

To output Ultra HD Blu-ray movies to an external display, the connection port embedded on the mainboard must support HDCP 2.2. For laptop PCs, please refer to the specification of your laptop to see if the external display connection (HDMI/DisplayPort) supports HDCP 2.2 output.

[Ultra HD Blu-ray]
Display device with HDMI 2.0a/DisplayPort 1.3 connection interface, and must support HDCP 2.2.
Screen resolution: Ultra HD resolution (3840 x 2160).

Display cable: HDMI 2.0a/DisplayPort 1.3 version cable without any adapters/splitters/repeaters.
Does a laptop that has an i7700x and say a discrete GTX 1060 have one graphics processor or two? That is, does the i7700x cpu (or any other Intel cpu, for that matter) that is designed and engineered for, and dedicated to, laptops that will have a discrete say 1060 gpu, have integrated Intel 630 or 40 HD graphics? (I ask because in the case of our Dell XPS desktop with an i5 and installed-by-Dell-at-time-of-sale discrete GTX gpu, Dell chose an i5 that does not have any Intel graphics processing capability. Presumably this was a cost-saving measure and I wonder if this might be the same for those Intel cpus that are designed to be installed in laptops that have discrete nVidia gpus.)

The reason I ask this is obvious. If it is true that Intel 630 or 640 must do the processing for UHD BD movies to play, and there is only one HDMI port on the laptop that has the discrete 10xx gpu, by my logic that laptop is not going to be able to support playback of commercial UHD BDs UNLESS for this specific purpose the cpu's internal graphics processor "takes over" and the 10xx "turns off" and allows the cpu's output to simply "pass through" to the HDMI port.

If the cpus that are dedicated to laptops that have discrete 10xx gpus do not have internal Intel graphics (after all, why should they?) and the requirement for 630 or 640 to play UHD BD movies still holds firm, then that laptop will not support UHD BD playback.

Have I missed something here?
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post #14 of 32 Old 06-08-2017, 08:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Herve View Post
Does a laptop that has an i7700x and say a discrete GTX 1060 have one graphics processor or two? That is, does the i7700x cpu (or any other Intel cpu, for that matter) that is designed and engineered for, and dedicated to, laptops that will have a discrete say 1060 gpu, have integrated Intel 630 or 40 HD graphics? (I ask because in the case of our Dell XPS desktop with an i5 and installed-by-Dell-at-time-of-sale discrete GTX gpu, Dell chose an i5 that does not have any Intel graphics processing capability. Presumably this was a cost-saving measure and I wonder if this might be the same for those Intel cpus that are designed to be installed in laptops that have discrete nVidia gpus.)

The reason I ask this is obvious. If it is true that Intel 630 or 640 must do the processing for UHD BD movies to play, and there is only one HDMI port on the laptop that has the discrete 10xx gpu, by my logic that laptop is not going to be able to support playback of commercial UHD BDs UNLESS for this specific purpose the cpu's internal graphics processor "takes over" and the 10xx "turns off" and allows the cpu's output to simply "pass through" to the HDMI port.

If the cpus that are dedicated to laptops that have discrete 10xx gpus do not have internal Intel graphics (after all, why should they?) and the requirement for 630 or 640 to play UHD BD movies still holds firm, then that laptop will not support UHD BD playback.

Have I missed something here?
My gaming laptop has an Nvidia 980M. There is a physical button near the keyboard to toggle to the Intel iGPU. I think it requires a reboot.

I had an older gaming laptop with an Nvidia 660M and there was no option for using the Intel iGPU.

So unless you can make the laptop meet the PowerDVD requirements with the Intel iGPU then you won't be using it for UHD. Maybe later it will get an update and support Nvidia.

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post #15 of 32 Old 06-08-2017, 08:53 AM - Thread Starter
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My gaming laptop has an Nvidia 980M. There is a physical button near the keyboard to toggle to the Intel iGPU. I think it requires a reboot.

I had an older gaming laptop with an Nvidia 660M and there was no option for using the Intel iGPU.

So unless you can make the laptop meet the PowerDVD requirements with the Intel iGPU then you won't be using it for UHD. Maybe later it will get an update and support Nvidia.
Interesting on both counts.

Have you found a need to use that button to switch to the Intel iGPU? If not, I wonder why Intel would provide that capability -- for example, perhaps if the nVidia gpu fails?

Regardless, I'd like to hear from owners of the latest kaby/Nvidia laptops to chime in with how many gpus are present on their units and whether they can switch back and forth between the two, if there are two.
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Looks like Computex dropped the hot potato (or cold potato rather) called UHD Blu-ray.

I see no new real support, new drivers and pretty much no interest at all.
Gaming is where the money is, not UHD Blu-ray, the market is just too small.
I also believe that the industry does not want us to play our UHD discs on a computer, this has become quite clear right from the beginning with all these ridiculous requirements _ nothing has changed.

There's always the wait until the next show, the next driver update the next line of GPU's that are supposed to support UHD...
Glad I bought my stand-alone.

If you have the hardware in place, well fine, but even the it's a PITA.
HDR not working, driver incompatibilities, SGX failure...
I guess if one likes to tinker more then they like to watch there movies...

If RedFox does it's thing, if ever, then I'll look into it, but for now, I just don't see the point.

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post #17 of 32 Old 06-08-2017, 09:59 AM
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Looks like Computex dropped the hot potato (or cold potato rather) called UHD Blu-ray.

I see no new real support, new drivers and pretty much no interest at all.
Gaming is where the money is, not UHD Blu-ray, the market is just too small.
I also believe that the industry does not want us to play our UHD discs on a computer, this has become quite clear right from the beginning with all these ridiculous requirements _ nothing has changed.
Ironically it seems to be rather the opposite. "The Industry" must actually be really interested in supporting PC playback of UHD, or else they just wouldn't go through the obviously enormous, and costly, effort to develop all these security schemes to "protect" the content. At least somebody wants to support it. It would have been much easier for BDA/AACS-LA to just make their requirements such that it was impossible for PCs to be licensed.

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If RedFox does it's thing, if ever, then I'll look into it, but for now, I just don't see the point.
Agreed, I gave up watching discs in PCs a long time ago, pretty much when Blu-ray came out. The licensed software is crap, buggy, unreliable. When I get a disc from Netflix I don't want to have to rip it, or update player software, etc, I just want to put it in something and watch it. Standalone players do that, and do that very well. I also gave up on the idea of one box when it became impossible to do everything with one, consistent user interface. Once you lose the UI consistency the whole story of "one box" just goes down the toilet.

Of course for the movies I buy, I rip them all and play them with Kodi/LibreELEC, and very much look forward to the day I can do that with my UHD BDs.
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post #18 of 32 Old 06-08-2017, 10:34 AM - Thread Starter
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..............
I also believe that the industry does not want us to play our UHD discs on a computer, this has become quite clear right from the beginning with all these ridiculous requirements _ nothing has changed.
......................
You may very well be right, but this means that the UHD-BD drives for computers, as well as the Cyberlink UHD-BD software would have been verboten right from the very beginning.

So this indicates to me that "the industry" is broken up into at least two parts that have competing interests. Again, if it was one monolith, the drives and software for computers would never have been put on the market in the first place. In the latter case, THEN we could conclude today that there was and still is a genuine conspiracy to not allow commercial UHD-BD movie disks to be played on computers.

Unfortunately for 4K movies, well-produced, excellently-upscaled-by-bone-crunching-computer-software 1080p BD movies look amazingly close in picture quality to 4K...... especially at so-called "normal" viewing distances. If the 4K movie/disk producers want 4K to succeed on a mass scale, they're going to have to either reduce the quality of BDs and 1080 streams to the point where it looks obviously inferior to 4K at "normal" viewing distances, or market new movies only in 4K.

It'll be interesting to see how 4K UHD-BD movies fare in the future.

However, I think UHD displays/TVs will fare very well. AFAICT more and more people want bigger and bigger displays for computer work and computer or box games. Not only that, but the "normal" viewing distance seems to me to be getting closer, but I might very well be wrong on that.

For example, I know that I'd really enjoy a 55" Sony 900e as a computer monitor to do computer things and just plain web surfing perhaps in multiple windows. But I'd also be very interested to experience watching a good UHD-BD HDR movie on that same "TV" from a viewing distance of say 30". Would the immersive, "big picture effect" be similar to the one I experience when sitting in the first few rows of a movie theater? If it is, then I would have no further desire to go to a theater or buy a ridiculously expensive 4K projector to replace our 1080 RS1. I used to think that it would be the home projectors or, later, relatively tiny VR headsets that would finally kill commercial movie theaters. Now I think the murder weapons might be UHD TVs from which people sit just a few feet (or even less).
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post #19 of 32 Old 06-08-2017, 10:36 AM
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Ironically it seems to be rather the opposite. "The Industry" must actually be really interested in supporting PC playback of UHD, or else they just wouldn't go through the obviously enormous, and costly, effort to develop all these security schemes to "protect" the content. At least somebody wants to support it. It would have been much easier for BDA/AACS-LA to just make their requirements such that it was impossible for PCs to be licensed.
I suppose...

People were chomping at the for UHD playback on a computer and Cyberlink went to bat.
When it was found out what the requirements were, people said "are you kidding" ?
I think the only ones that are interested are literally the people on this forum.

I'm pretty sure Cyberlink had to pay enormous licensing fees to make this happen because they were sniffing a cash cow.
I wonder when Cyberlink found out about the insane requirements, or did they have a hand in it ?
Maybe by the time they did, it was too late to pull out.

It may appear that the industry was really interested in support, but I think they were quite naïve to believe that users were going to go to these extreme lengths and they lost the gamble.
They spent all this time and money to make sure people can't over come AACS 2.0 for nothing.

It doesn't make any sense, why make it so expensive and so difficult for UHD playback on an HTPC, when a stand-alone player can do it all for much less ? And a lot less trouble !

I'm going to argue that all this was put in place to keep people from exploiting UHD on an HTPC whether Cyberlink was there to support it or not.
An example of this are the drives from LG that could see the files. I think if it wasn't for the strict DRM, that those LG drives would easily play UHD discs.
Everything was already in place for UHD PC playback, free software (MPC-HC) video cards and drivers that supported HDMI 2.0 and H.264/265 etc.

Along came Microsoft and Hollywood and said "Ohhh no you don't" !

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post #20 of 32 Old 06-08-2017, 10:38 AM
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Interesting on both counts.

Have you found a need to use that button to switch to the Intel iGPU? If not, I wonder why Intel would provide that capability -- for example, perhaps if the nVidia gpu fails?

Regardless, I'd like to hear from owners of the latest kaby/Nvidia laptops to chime in with how many gpus are present on their units and whether they can switch back and forth between the two, if there are two.
I never use it. The button is there for power savings on battery mode. When you aren't needing top graphics performance and want longer battery life you can switch to the lower powered iGPU.

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post #21 of 32 Old 06-08-2017, 11:47 AM
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You may very well be right, but this means that the UHD-BD drives for computers, as well as the Cyberlink UHD-BD software would have been verboten right from the very beginning.

So this indicates to me that "the industry" is broken up into at least two parts that have competing interests. Again, if it was one monolith, the drives and software for computers would never have been put on the market in the first place. In the latter case, THEN we could conclude today that there was and still is a genuine conspiracy to not allow commercial UHD-BD movie disks to be played on computers.
There's definitely two camps, and they've got conflicting ideas. The content owners want as much control as possible, they don't want people to be able to "own" anything. Then the hardware/software manufacturers who would just assume everything be completely open so they can build novel new products to sell everybody. So what we get is a compromise, BDA is made up of both. Clearly the hardware/software manufactuers are big/interested enough to fight for it to be possible to make PC based players.

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Unfortunately for 4K movies, well-produced, excellently-upscaled-by-bone-crunching-computer-software 1080p BD movies look amazingly close in picture quality to 4K...... especially at so-called "normal" viewing distances. If the 4K movie/disk producers want 4K to succeed on a mass scale, they're going to have to either reduce the quality of BDs and 1080 streams to the point where it looks obviously inferior to 4K at "normal" viewing distances, or market new movies only in 4K.
The real difference with 4K isn't the resolution, it's the new mastering, 10 bit encoding, HEVC, HDR (ST.2084), WCG, that is where the improvement lies.

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It'll be interesting to see how 4K UHD-BD movies fare in the future.
Reportedly, they're selling better than Blu-ray was at the same point in it's life.

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For example, I know that I'd really enjoy a 55" Sony 900e as a computer monitor to do computer things and just plain web surfing perhaps in multiple windows. But I'd also be very interested to experience watching a good UHD-BD HDR movie on that same "TV" from a viewing distance of say 30". Would the immersive, "big picture effect" be similar to the one I experience when sitting in the first few rows of a movie theater?
Not really, while it's true that viewing ratio is one of the largest factors in immersion, other cues factor in as well and there's really no substitue for actual size.

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If it is, then I would have no further desire to go to a theater or buy a ridiculously expensive 4K projector to replace our 1080 RS1.
There's a lot of reasons other than resolution to upgrade your RS1, it's ancient. You'd be shocked if you saw an RS620.

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I suppose...

People were chomping at the for UHD playback on a computer and Cyberlink went to bat.
When it was found out what the requirements were, people said "are you kidding" ?
I think the only ones that are interested are literally the people on this forum.

I'm pretty sure Cyberlink had to pay enormous licensing fees to make this happen because they were sniffing a cash cow.
I wonder when Cyberlink found out about the insane requirements, or did they have a hand in it ?
Maybe by the time they did, it was too late to pull out.

It may appear that the industry was really interested in support, but I think they were quite naïve to believe that users were going to go to these extreme lengths and they lost the gamble.
They spent all this time and money to make sure people can't over come AACS 2.0 for nothing.
Cyberlink has never made software for us, they make software for the big OEMs, for bundling on computers. It's probably just part of their business model to implement every new format that comes out so they've got a new box to check on the feature list to push new versions. Cyberlink couldn't care less about the individual end users who buy the software "retail", they're not even a dot on their radar. It's the Dell's, Lenovo's, and the like that they care about.

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It doesn't make any sense, why make it so expensive and so difficult for UHD playback on an HTPC, when a stand-alone player can do it all for much less ? And a lot less trouble !
Because it's not made for HTPCs, it's made for new PCs that come from Dell/Lenovo/etc, and those will probably all meet the requirements pretty easily because they all come with new hardware anyway.

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I'm going to argue that all this was put in place to keep people from exploiting UHD on an HTPC whether Cyberlink was there to support it or not.
An example of this are the drives from LG that could see the files. I think if it wasn't for the strict DRM, that those LG drives would easily play UHD discs.
Everything was already in place for UHD PC playback, free software (MPC-HC) video cards and drivers that supported HDMI 2.0 and H.264/265 etc.
Oh, it's definitely the DRM that's making it hard, and that comes from the content owners who think they can stop people from sharing movies on the internet, and selling bootleg copies in the streets in Asia. Everything that PCs have to go through to play things is a compromise to satisfy them.

But that was kind of my point, somebody, in fact it must have been a relatively large and powerful group of somebody's must really want PC playback, because they fought the content owners to make it possible, and "won". Thought it's probable that the people who actually negotiated those things are so disconnected from reality that they really had no clue what the implications were.
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post #22 of 32 Old 10-01-2017, 08:48 AM - Thread Starter
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There's definitely two camps, and they've got conflicting ideas. The content owners want as much control as possible, they don't want people to be able to "own" anything. Then the hardware/software manufacturers who would just assume everything be completely open so they can build novel new products to sell everybody. So what we get is a compromise, BDA is made up of both. Clearly the hardware/software manufactuers are big/interested enough to fight for it to be possible to make PC based players.
.............

Cyberlink has never made software for us, they make software for the big OEMs, for bundling on computers. It's probably just part of their business model to implement every new format that comes out so they've got a new box to check on the feature list to push new versions. Cyberlink couldn't care less about the individual end users who buy the software "retail", they're not even a dot on their radar. It's the Dell's, Lenovo's, and the like that they care about.

Because it's not made for HTPCs, it's made for new PCs that come from Dell/Lenovo/etc, and those will probably all meet the requirements pretty easily because they all come with new hardware anyway.
.....................
But that was kind of my point, somebody, in fact it must have been a relatively large and powerful group of somebody's must really want PC playback, because they fought the content owners to make it possible, and "won". Thought it's probable that the people who actually negotiated those things are so disconnected from reality that they really had no clue what the implications were.
I'm resurrecting this thread that I started back in early June because I still have not bought a computer to replace our old XP laptop, and I'd like to know if any "off the shelf", already-UHD BD-playing, laptops or desktops have been brought to market or are about to be brought to market in the near future.

Thanks.
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Originally Posted by Herve View Post
I'm resurrecting this thread that I started back in early June because I still have not bought a computer to replace our old XP laptop, and I'd like to know if any "off the shelf", already-UHD BD-playing, laptops or desktops have been brought to market or are about to be brought to market in the near future.

Thanks.
None that we know of, though OEM drives for desktops and notebooks are now available from LG, as of today. The issue is that PC makers have done away with optical drives on notebooks, so you will be hard-pressed to find a current non-gaming notebook that you could upgrade.
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None that we know of, though OEM drives for desktops and notebooks are now available from LG, as of today. The issue is that PC makers have done away with optical drives on notebooks, so you will be hard-pressed to find a current non-gaming notebook that you could upgrade.
Thanks, Lex.

Because I am still having such a great experience with an old HP slimline HTPC that was originally built and configured by HP to play both HD-DVDs and BDs during the "format war" a number of years ago, the ideal thing for me would be to buy a laptop or desktop that is already fully configured (UHD-BD drive, playback software and all) to play UHD-BDs, as well as playing and writing regular BDs and DVDs and doing all of the other typical computer tasks -- essentially, a modern-day, play-anything, do anything version of my old, ultra-reliable slimline.

Are there any signs or speculation that such a device is in the cards in the near future?

If not, I'm seriously considering buying this laptop, but used and at a good price:
https://www.gigabyte.com/Laptop/P57X-v7#kf
I don't have much hope that at the present time it can be configured with an external UHD-bd drive to play UHD bds, but maybe in the future with software/driver upgrades. If not, it's still a helluva laptop.

Thanks.
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HP still makes the Slimline, but all current models are equipped with HDMI 1.4 as far as I know, so they are not an option until that changes. It is a product they only offer through reseller channels and not their own website, so you are stuck with low-end configs that will end up costing you a lot of money to upgrade for HTPC use. You'd have to spend about half as much or more of the cost of the unit to get it right with hardware upgrades and there are presently no valid video card upgrades for those that would meet the UHD-BD requirements.

That laptop can be upgraded with the LG drive, but the GPU drivers for UHD-BD aren't available yet. That could come in the next several weeks, with the next big Windows 10 update, though I can't say with any certainty when the release date for the drivers would be.
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Thanks, Lex.

The old adage "all good things come to those who wait" is never more true than when it comes to waiting for a new computer or TV. If history is a guide for the future, the longer you wait, the better and less expensive those items become. (Whether that applies to reliability is another issue entirely.)

For example, during the four months that have transpired since I started this thread -- months spent without buying a new computer-- I haven't suffered one bit. Maybe I'll feel the same after another few months.
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The big problem is optical formats are dying. Most PCs do not have an optical drive anymore (and the UHD drives out now are full size drives, not laptop drives), and the public hasn't shown as much interest in disc formats as they have for streaming or downloads.

Chances are, if you want a prebuilt PC, it will have to be a white box desktop unit.
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The big problem is optical formats are dying. Most PCs do not have an optical drive anymore (and the UHD drives out now are full size drives, not laptop drives), and the public hasn't shown as much interest in disc formats as they have for streaming or downloads.

Chances are, if you want a prebuilt PC, it will have to be a white box desktop unit.
Plus Blu-ray playback never really took off on laptops (or desktops) even when they did ship with BD drives.

My work laptop is a rather current model and is a mobile workstation. At about $2,800 it shipped with a blank loaded into the optical drive bay.
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post #29 of 32 Old 10-02-2017, 07:43 AM
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I noticed this yesterday...

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As I said, desktop and notebook optical drives are available from LG now. It's simply a matter of upgrading, if possible. At this point, we all know the $200-$300 or so (not factoring in sale prices) cost for just the software and the drive make it a bad deal, but it's on the table nonetheless. However, it's really next year's integrated GPUs that will be checking all the boxes for UHD-BD, so I expect pre-configured systems to be available, especially since the 4K monitors that were to come out for the holidays have been pushed back to next year.

At a cursory glance, if you already have the required CPU & GPU, you could snag the LG desktop drive and the Ultra version of PowerDVD 17 for around $130, give or take some sales tax and shipping. Such a deal would be good, even if you don't have the required GPU, because you can get an add-in card as soon as UHD-BD drivers are available for the GPU of your choice. I will put together a system next year, either Intel or AMD-based, depending on what seems like the best fit.
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