Subwoofer RG6 line help - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 10 Old 02-10-2010, 04:41 PM - Thread Starter
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Hi - not finding an answer in any older threads, so I'll ask here - I have RG6 line run in the walls for a subwoofer. Looking for a wall plate that is female coax on one side and female rca on the other. Haven't had any luck finding one on monoprice.com and other sites. Does anyone have any suggestions where to look?

thanks!
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post #2 of 10 Old 02-10-2010, 05:30 PM
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dont know what you are saying here. I think you are saying the inside of the wall you want f-type connectors and the outside regular rca. if this is the case use a f type on both sides with a custom rg6 cable you can make with f type on one end and rca on the other.
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post #3 of 10 Old 02-11-2010, 12:39 AM
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Sounds like you would like to have a wall plate with a single RCA female that mounts on the wall much like cable tv. There are other options. You could mount a BNC fitting on the wallplate instead and that would be 75 ohm like the RG6 and be a locking fitting as well. Radio Shack has all the f fittings and adapters for F to BNC or F to RCA and wall plates to fit them. Some of their fittings are gold plated too. There are even retrofit boxes that can be mounted into dry wall without having to find a stud to nail to (to give an even more profesional approach). Are you good at terminating coax? It's very easy and Radio Shack has the tools to do that as well.
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post #4 of 10 Old 02-11-2010, 08:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rpryce77 View Post

Looking for a wall plate that is female coax on one side and female rca on the other.

Probably no such thing. Just get a regular F-connector wall plate (aka "female coax"). Use a regular "antenna" cable between the wall and sub, and use an F-to-RCA adapter at the subwoofer end.




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Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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post #5 of 10 Old 02-11-2010, 01:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rpryce77 View Post

Hi - not finding an answer in any older threads, so I'll ask here - I have RG6 line run in the walls for a subwoofer. Looking for a wall plate that is female coax on one side and female rca on the other. Haven't had any luck finding one on monoprice.com and other sites. Does anyone have any suggestions where to look?

thanks!

ICC (and others) make keystone inserts that are female F on the inside, and female RCA on the outside. The RCA insert is available in all colors so they can be used for component video (R/G/B), composite video (Y), stereo audio (R/W), SPDIF digital (O) etc. I think I got mine from the Computer Cable Store but they are widely available for around $2.50-3.00. (Example photo is their part #IC107RFC). You can use a "single" keystone wallplate, or combine the sub feed with other low voltage signals up to six in a single gang or twelve in a dual gang. I have used these for ceiling projector feeds, wall subwoofer, Wii link, composite video etc. and they work well.

Leviton also makes a "unified" keystone insert that crimps directly to RG-6 on the inside and has a female RCA on the outside, but it takes a different compression tool than I have so I haven't used them.

Hope that helps!

Mike
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post #6 of 10 Old 02-11-2010, 06:14 PM - Thread Starter
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thanks to all for the suggestions! I already have a box mounted to a stud and the RG6 line was run before the drywall went up, so no need for a retrofit. Anyone have an idea which method would give the best signal quality:

1) regular f-connector wall plate, coax cable from wall to sub, with F to RCA adapter at end

2) female F-connector/female RCA for wall plate, RCA sub cable directly from wall to sub

thanks again!
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post #7 of 10 Old 02-12-2010, 02:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rpryce77 View Post

Anyone have an idea which method would give the best signal quality:

1) regular f-connector wall plate, coax cable from wall to sub, with F to RCA adapter at end

2) female F-connector/female RCA for wall plate, RCA sub cable directly from wall to sub

thanks again!

IMHO it makes no difference quality-wise. Purists would prefer the fewest possible connectors between the source and device, so would probably choose #2, but were talking about analog low frequency audio, which is not fussy. You can probably find all the pieces locally for solution #1 in Lowes, HomeDepot, Radio Shack, etc. You may have to order the F/RCA adapter, but it's easy to find and not expensive.

Mike
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post #8 of 10 Old 02-12-2010, 03:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr.Rich View Post

You could mount a BNC fitting on the wallplate...

I use BNC connectors for coax in my home. Be aware that BNC connectors come in 75 ohm and 50 ohm versions. You will normally want to use the 75 ohm versions with RG6. No telling what Radio Shack sells. Using 50 ohm connectors can cause reflection of part of the signal. It may or may not be enough to cause you problems. For a subwoofer, it shouldn't be an issue at all because the cable isn't going to be acting like a transmission line unless it is very, very long. Any decent shielded cable, doesn't even have to be coax, will work. For RF, it is a different story.
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post #9 of 10 Old 02-12-2010, 03:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colm View Post

I use BNC connectors for coax in my home. Be aware that BNC connectors come in 75 ohm and 50 ohm versions. You will normally want to use the 75 ohm versions with RG6. No telling what Radio Shack sells. Using 50 ohm connectors can cause reflection of part of the signal. It may or may not be enough to cause you problems. For a subwoofer, it shouldn't be an issue at all because the cable isn't going to be acting like a transmission line unless it is very, very long. Any decent shielded cable, doesn't even have to be coax, will work. For RF, it is a different story.

When using the cable/connector for audio, the characteristic impedance of 50 or 75 Ohms won't matter. What will matter is mixing 50 & 75 Ohm connectors! They have different size center pins. So going small pin to large hole - no contact. Going large pin to small hole - destroys the female connector.

Also outside diameter of the cable needs to mate with the connector.

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post #10 of 10 Old 02-12-2010, 05:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedskater View Post

So going small pin to large hole - no contact. Going large pin to small hole - destroys the female connector.

Some manufacturers' 50 ohm and 75 ohm connectors are compatible, like Amphenol. It depends on the design. But it sure won't hurt to stick to one or the other.

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Also outside diameter of the cable needs to mate with the connector.

And this is true whether we are talking about BNC connectors, F connectors, or any other coax connector. One size does not fit all.
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