Power Conditioner reads 122-126v frequently. Should I be worried? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 16 Old 02-17-2011, 11:05 PM - Thread Starter
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First of all, the system in question:

Pioneer PRO-141FD
Arcam AVR600
SVS PB13 Ultra
PSB Subsonic 6i
Oppo BDP83
Cambridge Audio Azur 840C
PS3

I currently have my entire system connected to an older Monster "Reference" 1600 Power Conditioner( I know...) and the theater room is on its own 20A circuit alone (receptacles only, no lights). I know this is not the ideal solution and I should probably have 2 seperate conditioners/regulators basically one for the TV/AVR and one for the 2 Subs... or 2 seperate 20A circuits doing the same thing.

My conditioner frequently reads 122-125v and tonight it is reading 126v for the first time (that I've witnessed anyway). This is when all gear is still in stand-by mode, it drops down to 122-123 (from 126) when in operation. Should I be worried about overvolting my gear and potentially causing damage/shortening its lifespan? I'd be particularly worried about the 141FD, AVR600 and PB13 Ultra as they are not exactly cheap.

I've been looking at some better options for power conditioning... something that includes voltage regulation, do you guys feel this is necessary? Aside from this, is there anything that I should do with regards to the single 20A circuit? Is there a cost-effective way to beef up the circuit or to run another 20A or 30A line into the theater room?

I'm by no means an electrical expert but is it not possible to just re-route the current line into an empty 30A circuit instead of the 20A? I should also mention that I have a surge protector installed @ the panel for whole-house protection, it's called "Intermatic PanelGuard". Unfortunately, I don't think it has any regulation properties.

Cheers.

Why let facts or common sense get in the way of your opinions.

Quick shot of my gear/theater.
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post #2 of 16 Old 02-18-2011, 09:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AuralXTC View Post

First of all, the system in question:

Pioneer PRO-141FD
Arcam AVR600
SVS PB13 Ultra
PSB Subsonic 6i
Oppo BDP83
Cambridge Audio Azur 840C
PS3

I currently have my entire system connected to an older Monster "Reference" 1600 Power Conditioner( I know...) and the theater room is on its own 20A circuit alone (receptacles only, no lights). I know this is not the ideal solution and I should probably have 2 seperate conditioners/regulators basically one for the TV/AVR and one for the 2 Subs... or 2 seperate 20A circuits doing the same thing.

My conditioner frequently reads 122-125v and tonight it is reading 126v for the first time (that I've witnessed anyway). This is when all gear is still in stand-by mode, it drops down to 122-123 (from 126) when in operation. Should I be worried about overvolting my gear and potentially causing damage/shortening its lifespan? I'd be particularly worried about the 141FD, AVR600 and PB13 Ultra as they are not exactly cheap.

I've been looking at some better options for power conditioning... something that includes voltage regulation, do you guys feel this is necessary? Aside from this, is there anything that I should do with regards to the single 20A circuit? Is there a cost-effective way to beef up the circuit or to run another 20A or 30A line into the theater room?

I'm by no means an electrical expert but is it not possible to just re-route the current line into an empty 30A circuit instead of the 20A? I should also mention that I have a surge protector installed @ the panel for whole-house protection, it's called "Intermatic PanelGuard". Unfortunately, I don't think it has any regulation properties.

Cheers.

You don't need to worry. The first issue is the voltage measurement from the 'conditioner'. The voltage reading is not an absolute number but may vary from the actual voltage due to equipment 'tolerance' issues. I would expect this equipment to have a tolerance no better than 1-3%...which means the actual voltage is somewhat different. You would need to use a recently calibrated voltmeter to determine the actual voltage magnitude with any certainty.

Additionally, your equipment will probably operate easily within a 10% tolerance of 120V meaning a range of 108-132V nominal. Some equipment is more sensitive than others, but generally this range works for most eqiupment.

My Home Theater Site:

DJ-Theater
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post #3 of 16 Old 02-18-2011, 01:58 PM
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Should you be worried? If you live in Europe, yes.

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Applications Engineer
QSC Audio Products, LLC
Costa Mesa, Calif.

Secretary, Audio Engineering Society
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post #4 of 16 Old 02-18-2011, 06:17 PM
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That's the bad thing of having "too much information" like the instant mileage gauge on that new car... now u want to coast the dang thing!

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post #5 of 16 Old 02-18-2011, 06:46 PM
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I would rather have 122-126 than beg to get 105-110 out of the outlet.
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post #6 of 16 Old 02-19-2011, 08:35 PM
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Quote:


it drops down to 122-123 (from 126)

I'd be a bit concerned that it drops by 3 or 4 volts when you turn it on....Did you use 14 gauge wire for this circuit or something?
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post #7 of 16 Old 02-19-2011, 08:53 PM
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Why? The voltage is well within the operating range of the equipment. There is going to be a difference in measured voltage between an unloaded circuit and a loaded one due to IR losses under load. NEC says that 5% voltage drop is acceptable for normal efficiency. Even if there is more, it is just an efficiency problem if the voltage stays within the operating range of the equipment.
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post #8 of 16 Old 02-19-2011, 10:26 PM
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The voltage display detection and drive circuit design may also affect the accuracy.
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post #9 of 16 Old 02-21-2011, 12:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colm View Post

Why? The voltage is well within the operating range of the equipment. There is going to be a difference in measured voltage between an unloaded circuit and a loaded one due to IR losses under load. NEC says that 5% voltage drop is acceptable for normal efficiency. Even if there is more, it is just an efficiency problem if the voltage stays within the operating range of the equipment.

It was more curiosity. Assuming a hundred feet of wire between the fusebox and the outlet, 12 gauge would be loaded to about 10 amps to get that drop, 14 gauge to 6 or so. 1200 watts of load seemed quite a bit....
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post #10 of 16 Old 02-28-2011, 04:49 PM
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I recommend to get rid of the Monster snake-oil box and go to a Furman IT-20II, if you can afford it. It is a balanced conditioner with industrial Hubbell outlets and a circuit breaker. Mine reads 116-117v constantly. It also eliminates any video and audio noise, good to 30A, not that I ever draw THAT much current.

-A
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post #11 of 16 Old 03-01-2011, 06:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ProAudio5 View Post

I recommend to get rid of the Monster snake-oil box and go to a Furman IT-20II, if you can afford it. It is a balanced conditioner with industrial Hubbell outlets and a circuit breaker. Mine reads 116-117v constantly. It also eliminates any video and audio noise, good to 30A, not that I ever draw THAT much current.

-A

So it is good for 30 amps Lol on a 15 amps circuit wow this thing make current now. 116 to 117 v or 125 volts will depends on your area power grid.

Warning to prevent risk of injuries, you should always be smarter than the equipment you are about to use.
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post #12 of 16 Old 03-01-2011, 06:41 AM
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From the list of stuff you have i honestly do not think you need more than the 20 amps circuit you have right now. Also a power conditioner should not be use with amplifier(s) or high demand current electronic devices just plug them directly to the wall and stop being worry IMO.

Warning to prevent risk of injuries, you should always be smarter than the equipment you are about to use.
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post #13 of 16 Old 03-01-2011, 05:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kouack View Post

So it is good for 30 amps Lol on a 15 amps circuit wow this thing make current now. 116 to 117 v or 125 volts will depends on your area power grid.

Presumably you are referring to me. Honestly when you have a system setup like I do, and you have multiple sources scattered about a large listening room (Large 3-gun CRT, cable box, several consoles, computer, amplifiers, crossovers and other equipment all in different racks), it makes a dramatic difference in isolating ground loops and noise. Also provides ground-referenced circuit-interruptor. Plus, I have a dedicated 30A supply to the equipment, not 15.

-A
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post #14 of 16 Old 03-01-2011, 06:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ProAudio5 View Post

Honestly when you have a system setup like I do, and you have multiple sources scattered about a large listening room (Large 3-gun CRT, cable box, several consoles, computer, amplifiers, crossovers and other equipment all in different racks), it makes a dramatic difference in isolating ground loops and noise. Also provides ground-referenced circuit-interruptor. Plus, I have a dedicated 30A supply to the equipment, not 15.

-A

Please an exhaustive list of equipment with picture would be great, because sound like my c... is bigger than yours contest to me. Anyway my system still bigger than yours and still very small compare to 1000's of people here with only about 10 kilo watts, still not a single ground loops problem.

Have you check where the ground of your house is hook up after the panel?, mine it is a single point to earth.

Can you explain what kind of plug you have to hook up your 30 amps thing?? because 30 amps is not the regular home plug and the furman you are referring to is rated 20 amps http://www.furmansound.com/product.php?id=IT-20_II

Warning to prevent risk of injuries, you should always be smarter than the equipment you are about to use.
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post #15 of 16 Old 03-02-2011, 04:44 AM
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You are correct, and 30A was a typo. However, is there any reason bring the size of your appendage into the discussion and be so rude when discussing AV gear? I was simply making a recommendation, nothing more. Why so nasty and subversive?

-A
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post #16 of 16 Old 03-04-2011, 05:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AuralXTC View Post

My conditioner frequently reads 122-125v and tonight it is reading 126v for the first time (that I've witnessed anyway). This is when all gear is still in stand-by mode, it drops down to 122-123 (from 126) when in operation.

The national standard for the electrical supply in the US and Canada is ± 5% (114V – 126V) so you are within range. Its normal for voltage to vary depending on where you live, the time of day and season. IMHO, it is unusual for voltage to drop as much as you’ve described by simply turning on your system.

To make a comparison, I took voltage measurements of the circuit feeding my HT system in standby and when powered. Voltage was 122.0 with the system in standby and 121.9 with everything on. Your system does not have any high current draw equipment like big class A monoblocks, so IMO you should not be seeing that kind of voltage drop.

Quote:


I've been looking at some better options for power conditioning... something that includes voltage regulation, do you guys feel this is necessary?

IMO its not necessary.

Quote:
Originally Posted by olyteddy View Post

I'd be a bit concerned that it drops by 3 or 4 volts when you turn it on.

I Agree.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ProAudio5 View Post

I recommend to get rid of the Monster snake-oil box and go to a Furman IT-20II, if you can afford it. It is a balanced conditioner with industrial Hubbell outlets and a circuit breaker. Mine reads 116-117v constantly. It also eliminates any video and audio noise, good to 30A, not that I ever draw THAT much current.

Your voltage varies so little because where you live, apparently its rock solid, not because of your Furman unit, which does not regulate voltage. I use balanced power too with my main system.

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