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post #1 of 8 Old 07-30-2011, 04:31 PM - Thread Starter
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Looking to learn about Cables in A/V, Computer, and Telecommunication.
So I’m looking for sites and books and just help. Thanks for Your help. Maybe when I’m done I can make a FAQ type thread on cables. Looking for shielding, and high quality.* I don’t want to hear just buy it. I want to learn.*

What I’m looking for In cables:
Types of cables and use’s
Types of Shielding and uses
Types of connecting methods and connectors
Tools used for building and how to.
Do cables that have a metal jacket over them have better shielding or is this for looks?

Type of connecting methods I know of are:
Solder, Crimp, compression, Push on, Screw on


Speakers

Car speakers
Direct soldering, Spade

Loudspeakers
Bare wire, banana plug, Spade

Stander speakers
RCA, Spade, push in wire

Audio amplifiers

Car amplifiers
Pre amp inputs. RCA just stander nothing special?

Home amplifiers, stereo, A/V receivers

RCA
Banana plug
Spade
Push in Wire type


Computers
• Wifi *exclude RP as its same cable just different wiring*
o SMA
o SMB
o TNC
o MCX
o MMCX
o N connector

Modem
o “Cable” Coax
F connector
Coaxial
o “DSL“ phone
Registered Jack RJ11
Cat5-6


Ethernet
Connector - RJ45
Cable - Cat5,Cat5E, Cat6, cat7

Phone jack
Connector- RJ-11 To RJ-14
Cable- Cat?




Can one make an usb cable? Hyperlink Technologies l-com.com has cable, connector and cover (2.0). Seems to be solder job.
Can one make IEEE 1394 /firewire?
Can one make S-video,?
Fixing repairing Molex cords.( Removal of pins)
-----------------------------------------------------

Connectors:
F Connector
Ideal has tools and connectors.
Type: Crimped, Twist on, Push on, Compression
Cable: RG 6, RG 59, RG 11, Plenum
Ohm:75 Ω
Uses: TV, Satellite, Cable modems, others


RCA
Ideal has tools and connectors.
Type: compression
Cable: RG 6, RG 59, Mini-coax
Ohm: 75 Ω
Uses: loudspeakers, Composite Video, Digital audio (S/PDIF), Stereo audio, others


BNC
Ideal has tools and connectors.
Type: compression
Cable: RG 6, RG 59, Plenum
Ohm: 50 Ω and 75 Ω
Frequencies: 4 GHz And 2 GHz
Uses: Test equipment, Amateur radio, Commercial video devices, Recording studios, others




N Connector
Fab-corp.com and Hyperlink Technologies l-com.com has tools and connectors.
Type: Crimp
Cable: LMR 100, 195, 240, 400, 600, RG 316, 174, 58, 8/X, 8/U, WBC 100, 195, 240, 400, Belden 9913
Ohm: 50 Ω and 75 Ω
Frequencies: Up to 11 GHz, Some up to 18 GHz
Uses: Wifi equipment, Audio equipment, Amateur radio, Video equipment, others


TNC
Fab-corp.com and Hyperlink Technologies l-com.com has tools and connectors.
Type: Crimp
Cable: LMR 100, 195, 240, 400, 600, RG 316, 174, 58, 8/X, 8/U, WBC 100, 195, 240, 400, Belden 9913
Ohm: 50 Ω and 75 Ω
Frequencies: Up to 11 GHz
Uses: Wifi equipment, Audio equipment, power, Video, others


SMA

Fab-corp.com and Hyperlink Technologies l-com.com has tools and connectors.
Type: Crimp
Cable: LMR 100, 195, 240, 400, 600, RG 316, 174, 58, 8/X, WBC 100, 195, 240, 400
Ohm: 50 Ω
Frequencies: Up to 18 GHz, some up to 26.5GHz
Uses: Wifi equipment, others

MMCX
Fab-corp.com and Hyperlink Technologies l-com.com has tools and connectors.
Type: Crimp
Cable: LMR 100, WBC 100, RG 316, 188, 174
Ohm: 50 Ω
Frequencies: up to 6 GHz
Uses: GPS, Wifi equipment, PDA’s, others




MCX
Fab-corp.com and Hyperlink Technologies l-com.com has tools and connectors.
Type: Crimp
Cable: LMR 100, WBC 100, RG 316, 188, 174
Ohm: 50 Ω and 75 Ω
Frequencies: Up to 6 GHz
Uses: GPS, Wifi equipment, others



SMB
Fab-corp.com and Hyperlink Technologies l-com.com has tools and connectors.
Type: Crimp
Cable: LMR 100, RG 316, 174
Ohm: 50 Ω and 75 Ω
Frequencies: Up to 4 GHz
Uses: Wifi equipment, others

Banana Plug
has tools and connectors.
Type: Screw, solder, push on
Cable:
Uses:

Spades
has tools and connectors.
Type: Crimp, solder
Cable:
Uses:

RJ
Hyperlink Technologies l-com.com , Ideal has tools and connectors.
Type: Crimp
Cable:
Uses: Phones, Phone lines




8p8c “Rj45”
Hyperlink Technologies l-com.com , Ideal, monoprice, parts-express has tools and connectors.
Type: Crimp
Cable: Cat5, Cat5e, Cat6, Cat6a, Cat7
Uses: Ethernet Cable, others?

Notes: still working on this. Time is kinda short atm school is starting back up.

L-com Low loss cable is equivalent the LMR cable as flows.
CA-100 = LMR 100
CA-400 = LMR 400
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post #2 of 8 Old 07-30-2011, 06:07 PM
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Have you read the wikipedia articles on the subjects? That would be a good start.
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post #3 of 8 Old 07-30-2011, 09:17 PM
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There is a new vocation for ya... Cableisseur.

Solution: FREE. Explanation: I will have to charge$ you.

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post #4 of 8 Old 08-01-2011, 07:00 AM
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http://www.amazon.com/Audio-Video-In.../dp/0071386211

AV Cable Installer's Pocket Guide, by Stephen Lampen



NOT a pocket reference guide - an interesting read on cable construction, with a bit of history and amusing anecdotes rolled in. Each time you re-read, you'll gain more.

Edit -

Quote:


Steve Lampen has worked for Belden for nineteen years and is currently Multimedia Technology Manager and also Product Line Manager for Entertainment Products. Prior to Belden, Steve had an extensive career in radio broadcast engineering and installation, film production, and electronic distribution. Steve holds an FCC Lifetime General License (formerly a First Class FCC License) and is an SBE Certified Radio Broadcast Engineer. On the data side he is a BICSI Registered Communication Distribution Designer. His latest book, "The Audio-Video Cable Installer's Pocket Guide" is published by McGraw-Hill. His column "Wired for Sound" appears in Radio World Magazine.

Looks like he recently lectured at the National Association of Broadcasters conference in LV, covering 10 gig networking.

http://expo.nabshow.com/mynabshow201...ondetails.aspx

Quote:


2:00 – 2:30 p.m.
10 Gigabit Networking for Audio and Video
The hottest new thing in data is 10gig, 10GbaseT, and it will be sweeping into
audio, video and broadcast applications soon. This presentation shows what it is,
how it works, and why previous cable designs don’t work. Connectors, patch
panels, and patch cords are also critical and are included. This presentation
starts with the history of Ethernet® and twisted pairs for data.
Speaker: Stephen Lampen, Multimedia Technology Manager, Belden


Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it, no matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense. -Buddha

Give a monkey a brain and he'll swear he's the center of the universe. -Fishbone
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post #5 of 8 Old 08-02-2011, 01:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zeroblackwolf View Post

Whats up with all the coaxial cable? RG59, RG6 RG7 etc

In general, the larger diameter the copper conductor the stronger the signal and the farther it can be carried. The cable lines on the poles use a HUGE copper core (1/2" +).

RG6 or RG6 Quad is what most builders and companies use. Quad refers to quad shielding and uses a different fitting than the regular RG6, although the actual copper and connector is the same size. RG59 also bends and kinks too easily.

I used to install AT&T and Comcast 10 years ago and found myself replacing a lot of RG59 to resolve issues w/ weak signals.

I agree that Wikepedia would be a really good place to start.
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post #6 of 8 Old 08-03-2011, 07:23 AM
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Quote:


The cable lines on the poles use a HUGE copper core (1/2" +).

The coax cable is 1/2" in diameter, not the core.
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post #7 of 8 Old 08-03-2011, 09:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SAM64 View Post
The coax cable is 1/2" in diameter, not the core.
actually it's usually .625" for feeder and .875" for trunk in most modern systems. But you're right, that is outside diameter. I have worked with 1.125" QR cable for 'super trunk' applications too.
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post #8 of 8 Old 08-04-2011, 11:32 AM - Thread Starter
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Thanks your all your time guys.

Thanks for the book info to. I will give it a read.

Time is kinda tight atm, but I'm still looking up info on this subject. feel free to leave post if any of the info I posted is wrong I will fix it.
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