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post #571 of 592 Old 09-27-2012, 07:22 AM
 
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Use a relay
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post #572 of 592 Old 12-14-2012, 08:38 PM
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Hi all,

I was thinking of going with 2 120mm fans from cool components. The application is a large av cabinet that will be cooling a power amp. The units are variable speed, always on(not interested in thermal control), and will be powered through a switched outlet.

Does anyone have any feedback on the cool components units in terms of problems or noise complaints?

Thanks in advance
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post #573 of 592 Old 12-15-2012, 05:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Shopping-TVs View Post

Does anyone know how to add a cooling fan to an A/V Cabinet? I've found many fans at places like Fry's or Radioshack, but I am not sure how to wire the unit to an AC plug? I'm not too savy when it comes to electrical. Any advice appreciated!

The first thing to consider is a passive approach to improving cooling. I was having problems with my AVR overheating while listening to action movies at high levels. I bored a hole several inches in diameter behind the AVR and just below the top of the cabinet. The problem went away and the whole cabinet's internal temperature dropped.

I was seriously considering a solution with cooling fans, but it became unecessary.

If I was adding cooling fans, I would worry about increased noise. Large diameter fans turning at slow speeds address this problem. I would also want to have some kind of speed control so that the fan was turning no faster than would be required to obtain the desired amount of cooling.

Here is a package of products that I would consider:

(1) A 12 volt DC power supply. Even the largest fans only use a few tenths of an amp, so a 1/2 or 1 amp power supply would suffice:

http://www.jameco.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10001_10001_252808_-1



A fan speed controller:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811998129



A large diameter slow speed fan:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835345007

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post #574 of 592 Old 12-15-2012, 05:07 AM
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Originally Posted by jekbrown View Post

Anyone have any tips on switching a standard PC case fan on via the 12v trigger on the back of my Denon AVR2313? Not looking to power the fan via the trigger....just tell the fan to turn on. I know it's possible and the AV cooler guy on ebay sells fan kits that include a module to do this....but he doesn't sell said module seperately as far as I can tell and I'd like to use different fans/speed controllers. Any tips?

There are usually a bunch of spare power connectors inside the PC. The ground line is usually a black wire and the 12 volt line is usually a yellow wire. The connectors are usually the type called "molex". You can buy these connectors in electronics store or you can liberate one from a cheap CPU fan. The power drawn by PC case fans is usually trivial and running them directly from PC power should have no bad side effects.
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post #575 of 592 Old 05-09-2013, 02:27 PM
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Hello all, I am trying to revive this as someone might have come up with new things, I actually found this at walmart, it's a power adapter that has molex adapters so you just need the fan(newegg has good prices)

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835103052&nm_mc=KNC-GoogleAdwords&cm_mmc=KNC-GoogleAdwords-_-pla-_-Case+Fans-_-N82E16835103052&gclid=CNSer6jTibcCFcXe4Aod9j8Ang

http://www.walmart.com/ip/16318477?wmlspartner=wlpa&adid=22222222227000000000&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=&wl3=21486607510&wl4=&wl5=pla&veh=sem#Item+Description



this is my new project and it's just on the planning, I am trying to cool off an Onkyo HT-S5000 which I heard gets pretty hot.

I am trying to use some stuff that I have lying in the house, I have several old desktops with their power supply but I think that might be overkill to power two 120mm computer fans, also the power supplies are the size of a brick. I also have several power adapters from an IBM laptop thinkpad T41(I think these are 9v) not sure if these will work.

Any advice on either using the desktop powersupply or the laptop power adapter?


This is the technical info for the laptop power adapter, 16V might be too much?


AC adapter: This ac-to-dc converter supplies the necessary power to the computer. The ac adapter also charges the battery pack when it is installed in the computer.
Universal AC adapter (72 W):
Input is 100/240V AC, 1.4/0.7A, 50/60Hz
Output is 16 V dc, 4.5 A
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post #576 of 592 Old 05-09-2013, 03:34 PM
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A small "wall wart" DC power supply will power a fan. Look at the amperage rating of the fan and buy one that meets the specs. I used one of the "universal" DC adapters with adjustable voltage - which works as way to adjust the fan speed (a static setting). A laptop power supply is way overkill, too. These fans are usually <15W...

Also, the power supply you show has a 16V output, which is above the 12V input most fans will use. 16V may kill it.

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post #577 of 592 Old 05-09-2013, 05:41 PM
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Also be sure that there is an adequate sized air intake as too small an intake will cause the fan to over heat as well as increase its noise level. - sort of like blocking the hose on a vacuum cleaner. Use convection to help move air. Cool air should enter at the bottom front of the rack and exhaust near the top rear.
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post #578 of 592 Old 05-10-2013, 08:53 AM
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Hello,
I need some advice, I don't know much of this but from my research these are the two methods that I am looking at with their aprox costs.

Any advice on either one of the methods is much appreciated, I want to know if I really need a CPU fan speed controller as it gets a little complicated with the molex connectors or should I just strip the cables and solder them, if not I think I might have to purchase additional molex connectors/adapters


This is an instructive I found only, this is the cheap method.

http://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-Cooling-Fan-For-Under-10-Bucks/step2/Making-the-connections/


So Method one, cheap method
- one DC 9v adapter, I can find one in the house, 9V instead of 12v as it will have the two fans running slower than at 12V - if this is inaccurate please let me know. cost- free
- 2 CPU 120mm CPU fans - newegg has 4 of these for $14 free shipping
- one on/off 12v switch cost $5
wires will be stripped and connected to the switch, this is for a two fan setup
total aprox cost $13 per set up.( I am looking to build two of these 2 fan setups)

Method two

- 2 CPU 120mm CPU fans - newegg has 4 of these for $14 free shipping
- one on/off 12v switch cost $5
- one CPU 3 or 4 pin speed fan controller - ebay $4
- one Raidmax molex 12V DC adapter from walmart $12 shipped
aprox cost per set up : $28
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post #579 of 592 Old 05-10-2013, 01:20 PM
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Why dont you just use one of these...

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/searchtools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=5472147&SRCCODE=WEBGOOPA&cm_mmc_o=mH4CjC7BBTkwCjCV1-CjCE&gclid=CNyiz7KgjLcCFUVyQgodAycA6g

Ive been using one for three years with 4 SilenX 120mm case fans and it works perfectly.
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post #580 of 592 Old 05-31-2013, 11:55 AM
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So glad I stumbled onto this thread. I've got a issue and need advice. I'm building a custom AV rack/cabinet. I will need fans to help keep it cool. My design is to put a fan or two at the bottom bringing air in and a fan at the top to exhaust hot air. So here are my questions:

1) Thinking of using the Pyle PFN41. But is it thermostat controlled or does it just display the temp?
2) If it is thermostat controlled can I wire in 1 or 2 Pyle PFN31? This way they would all kick on together.
3) If this whole plan sucks mad.gif what options would you recommend? I'm working on it this wknd and need an answer ASAP. I don't need to install the fans this wknd but do need to plan where they're going and how I'll route everything. Thanks

GO BLUE
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post #581 of 592 Old 12-21-2013, 04:01 PM
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After skimming through this post I found this higher quality component:http://www.coolcomponents.com/Component-Cooling-System-_p_191.html



I might consider it for my Marantz 8801. I don't remember seeing a link to them in any of the posting here but if it is I wonder if there are any reviews?

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post #582 of 592 Old 12-22-2013, 07:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Audiguy3 View Post

After skimming through this post I found this higher quality component:http://www.coolcomponents.com/Component-Cooling-System-_p_191.html



I might consider it for my Marantz 8801. I don't remember seeing a link to them in any of the posting here but if it is I wonder if there are any reviews?

It's metal box with some fans and a wall wart, not much that can go wrong there unless they skimp on the fans. Even at that, you can get 4 new fans for like $15 at newegg.
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post #583 of 592 Old 01-26-2014, 11:41 AM
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Hi guys,

Sorry to bump a relatively old thread but I've been reading casually through it to garner a few ideas regarding cabinet cooling.

I've just today added a couple of silent 120MM fans to the rear of my cabinet, which is closed at the sides and mostly at the back (apart from some cable holes).

The cabinet has two shelves with my AV amp and Meridian power amp sitting together on the bottom shelf.

Prior to adding the fans there was a lot of hot air gathering in the bottom half around the amps and the top of the Onkyo was hot to the touch.

Now that I've added the fans, the amp casings are much, much cooler to the touch and the general 'atmosphere' in this little area is much cooler. This leads me to believe the fans are doing a good job of pulling in cool outside air through the front of the cabinet over the equipment.


However.. the onboard temp readout of my Onkyo 705 (using the 'hidden' temp menu) seems to read a couple of degrees (Celsius) higher with the fans on when "idling".


This is weird and doesn't tie in with the lower "ambient" and casing temps!

Should I ignore the onboard reading and consider the lower temperatures a good thing?


Thanks smile.gif
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post #584 of 592 Old 01-26-2014, 04:20 PM
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Very possible the onboard temperature sensor is getting a different reading as the airflow changes when the fans are on. If the temperature measured around the components is lower, and you aren't blocking up any passive venting on the components, then you're fine...

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post #585 of 592 Old 03-05-2014, 06:59 AM
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post #586 of 592 Old 06-02-2014, 09:21 AM
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I currently have an enclosed cabinet with two levels. Bottom level is a Yamaha AVR that gets pretty hot. There is less than one inch clearance to the shelf above it. The top shelf has my mini-ITX HTPC. There are two holes at each level in the back. The top level currently has a USB fan that I recently discovered had died. For some reason the fan would run even with the HTPC off. Even so, it didn't cool off the cabinet that much, so I've resorted to cracking the door open for some more air flow when the AVR and HTPC are on.

I have these 120mm 12v fans ($5-7 after rebate 4x each):

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835553002

and

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835553001

I wired a Molex connector to an old 12v 1A AC Adapter and tested the non-PWM fans. They run pretty quiet at the stock voltage, so I'm leaning toward using those. I'm looking for a recommendation on the push/pull and location for 2 or more fans in this cabinet. I would cut out holes for the 120mm fans. I have a smart power strip that should be able to turn the fans on through the AC adapter when the HTPC is on. I've also considered a slight case mod to pass a molex through the back of the case.

I might be able to mount the AVR on the top shelf, but it would be a major PITA. As it is now, I get about 1/4 inch clearance when sliding it in at a 45 degree angle, then setting it on the bottom. Please assume the AVR will remain on the bottom.

Should I seal up the existing wire holes so that the only entrance/exit are the new fan holes?

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post #587 of 592 Old 06-05-2014, 06:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stettin View Post

I currently have an enclosed cabinet with two levels. Bottom level is a Yamaha AVR that gets pretty hot. There is less than one inch clearance to the shelf above it. The top shelf has my mini-ITX HTPC. There are two holes at each level in the back. The top level currently has a USB fan that I recently discovered had died. For some reason the fan would run even with the HTPC off. Even so, it didn't cool off the cabinet that much, so I've resorted to cracking the door open for some more air flow when the AVR and HTPC are on..........]

Not sure I have any earth-shattering advice, but here are a few rambling thoughts:

To blow air efficiently out of the enclosure you need to allow an equal volume of air into the space - this is why cracking your doors open helps lower the overall temps. One of the ways to do this in your situation is to drill a couple of holes in the base (assuming that the lowest shelf is not above a sealed space) and in the intermediate shelf - at a minimum this allows the air to rise passively as it gets warmed. Another approach might be to cut an additional pair of holes in the right hand side of the back [maybe even constructing a rectangular 'periscope-like' plenum behind the holes that allows cooler air to be drawn in from floor level] to provide unrestricted ingress of the coolest air in the room into the cabinet.

Most PCs suck air in from the front and blow it out of the rear of the case - if this is true for you, I'd make sure that I had a hole lined up with the rear exhaust port/grill to ensure that the hot air stood the best chance of actually being ejected from the cabinet. I'd be concerned that the current location of your top fan means that it is fighting with the fan in the HTPC - compromising getting airflow through the PC's enclosure as the designer intended. For the HTPC shelf, if this were my set up I'd again probably locate a hole a the far right side and use a fan and the plenum concept to suck cooler air into the upper void, I'd then construct some form of cowling immediately behind the HTPCs exhaust opening (making it as airtight as possible to minimize leakage back into the cabinet) and cut a hole in the cabinet immediately behind this - assuming the PC's fan is adequate, there probably is no need to use a second fan to blow air out of the top shelf space. The limited clearance in front of the HTPC will obviously impede the efficient flow of air into the case, but if you're getting cooler air into that top space you are in a much better place than before.

In terms of swapping the two units, the general rule of thumb is to locate the devices in descending order of heat output - putting the one that generates the most heat at the top. I suspect that the HTPC probably emits more heat than your AVR, so I think you're good as is. It's not clear if there is a gap behind the middle shelf, but you obviously still need to deal with the AVR's thermal output. I know that vertically centering your holes is the right thing to do from an aesthetic point of view, but you need to consider the airflow path through the AVR - with your proposed config there's a possibility you could be trying to blow air into the cabinet very near to where the AVR is trying to exhaust it, I can't tell. Again, you need a similar sized hole for air to enter the enclosure as you have for exhausting it - don't confuse stirring up the air with actually pulling cool air in, getting it to pass appropriately through the components, and exhausting it properly from the cabinet

If you can face it, the doc linked to by Geenowalker is a probably the definitive treatise on 'thermal heat management' - it gives you the fundamental tenets of how best to avoid frying your gear.

Hope something here helps!

Dave
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post #588 of 592 Old 06-06-2014, 09:34 PM
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Just a thought... I know there are usb powered fans for laptops, etc. But has anyone seen anything similar that is HDMI powered? (I didn't see anything on Newegg or Ebay)
Would this work? Have a "passthru" jack similar to the USB powered one pictured, but utilizing HDMI tapping into the 5V leads..(?)

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post #589 of 592 Old 06-06-2014, 10:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DGF View Post

Not sure I have any earth-shattering advice, but here are a few rambling thoughts:

To blow air efficiently out of the enclosure you need to allow an equal volume of air into the space - this is why cracking your doors open helps lower the overall temps. One of the ways to do this in your situation is to drill a couple of holes in the base (assuming that the lowest shelf is not above a sealed space) and in the intermediate shelf - at a minimum this allows the air to rise passively as it gets warmed. Another approach might be to cut an additional pair of holes in the right hand side of the back [maybe even constructing a rectangular 'periscope-like' plenum behind the holes that allows cooler air to be drawn in from floor level] to provide unrestricted ingress of the coolest air in the room into the cabinet.

Most PCs suck air in from the front and blow it out of the rear of the case - if this is true for you, I'd make sure that I had a hole lined up with the rear exhaust port/grill to ensure that the hot air stood the best chance of actually being ejected from the cabinet. I'd be concerned that the current location of your top fan means that it is fighting with the fan in the HTPC - compromising getting airflow through the PC's enclosure as the designer intended. For the HTPC shelf, if this were my set up I'd again probably locate a hole a the far right side and use a fan and the plenum concept to suck cooler air into the upper void, I'd then construct some form of cowling immediately behind the HTPCs exhaust opening (making it as airtight as possible to minimize leakage back into the cabinet) and cut a hole in the cabinet immediately behind this - assuming the PC's fan is adequate, there probably is no need to use a second fan to blow air out of the top shelf space. The limited clearance in front of the HTPC will obviously impede the efficient flow of air into the case, but if you're getting cooler air into that top space you are in a much better place than before.

In terms of swapping the two units, the general rule of thumb is to locate the devices in descending order of heat output - putting the one that generates the most heat at the top. I suspect that the HTPC probably emits more heat than your AVR, so I think you're good as is. It's not clear if there is a gap behind the middle shelf, but you obviously still need to deal with the AVR's thermal output. I know that vertically centering your holes is the right thing to do from an aesthetic point of view, but you need to consider the airflow path through the AVR - with your proposed config there's a possibility you could be trying to blow air into the cabinet very near to where the AVR is trying to exhaust it, I can't tell. Again, you need a similar sized hole for air to enter the enclosure as you have for exhausting it - don't confuse stirring up the air with actually pulling cool air in, getting it to pass appropriately through the components, and exhausting it properly from the cabinet

If you can face it, the doc linked to by Geenowalker is a probably the definitive treatise on 'thermal heat management' - it gives you the fundamental tenets of how best to avoid frying your gear.

Hope something here helps!

Dave

I got impatient and cross posted over in the HTPC forum. Actually, my AVR produces much more heat than the HTPC, but is too wide to slide in horizontally. This was bad planning on my part when reading the dimensions of the entertainment center. I failed to take into account the borders on the inside of the cabinet space when comparing measurements. Luckily I can get the AVR in at a 45 degree angle and set down gently. It would take two people to get it in with the middle shelf already on the bottom, then slowly raise it up and place the peg supports in to get it on the top. There is about a 1-2" gap in the back of the cabinet. I tried to illustrate that with the HTPC hanging just over the edge.

I will try swapping the HTPC / AVR if adding the 120mm fans doesn't sufficiently cool the cabinet. In either case, would you suggest cutting the NEW hole on the top level as close to the top of the cabinet as possible? I don't really care about aesthetics for the back holes because you can barely see back there anyway. Also the bottom of the cabinet isn't flush with the ground, but I'm really hesitant to drill holes unless at a last resort.

I'm thinking of doing an intake 120mm in the bottom, exhaust at the top, covering up the remaining back middle holes that the cables are routing through.

Unfortunately that link is broken. Does anyone have an alternate link? Could it be this one? http://pdfserv.maximintegrated.com/en/an/AN4679.pdf
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post #590 of 592 Old 06-06-2014, 10:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cohocarl View Post

Just a thought... I know there are usb powered fans for laptops, etc. But has anyone seen anything similar that is HDMI powered? (I didn't see anything on Newegg or Ebay)
Would this work? Have a "passthru" jack similar to the USB powered one pictured, but utilizing HDMI tapping into the 5V leads..(?)

Do you really want to risk blowing out your HDMI boards in the AVR or TV, by making it try to do something like powering a add-on fan that it was not designed to do?
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post #591 of 592 Old 06-06-2014, 11:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnla View Post

Do you really want to risk blowing out your HDMI boards in the AVR or TV, by making it try to do something like powering a add-on fan that it was not designed to do?

Depends on how much load the HDMI boards are designed to handle. I don't think the USB was originally designed for being a power supply either. Just wondering if it would be possible, and if anyone has tried it.
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post #592 of 592 Old 06-07-2014, 12:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stettin View Post

I got impatient and cross posted over in the HTPC forum. Actually, my AVR produces much more heat than the HTPC, but is too wide to slide in horizontally. This was bad planning on my part when reading the dimensions of the entertainment center. I failed to take into account the borders on the inside of the cabinet space when comparing measurements. Luckily I can get the AVR in at a 45 degree angle and set down gently. It would take two people to get it in with the middle shelf already on the bottom, then slowly raise it up and place the peg supports in to get it on the top. There is about a 1-2" gap in the back of the cabinet. I tried to illustrate that with the HTPC hanging just over the edge.

I will try swapping the HTPC / AVR if adding the 120mm fans doesn't sufficiently cool the cabinet. In either case, would you suggest cutting the NEW hole on the top level as close to the top of the cabinet as possible? I don't really care about aesthetics for the back holes because you can barely see back there anyway. Also the bottom of the cabinet isn't flush with the ground, but I'm really hesitant to drill holes unless at a last resort.

I'm thinking of doing an intake 120mm in the bottom, exhaust at the top, covering up the remaining back middle holes that the cables are routing through.

Unfortunately that link is broken. Does anyone have an alternate link? Could it be this one? http://pdfserv.maximintegrated.com/en/an/AN4679.pdf

If you're shifting enough air through the cabinet then the vertical order of the components isn't overly critical, so do try any mods first before going through the pain of swapping the two units.

If the new hole is for exhausting air out of the cabinet, then yes, the higher the better - just make sure you're not pulling incoming air away from the devices' cooling intakes. You also need to ensure that you're actually ejecting warmed air, not air that is pulled in straight from any intake holes - messing up the path the air takes through the cabinet and equipment is a frequent design error for these types of cabinets. I'm not sure of the reasons for your hesitation around cutting holes in the base, but this is a great way to get the coolest air in the room into the cabinet.

Re. the doc link - you found an interesting piece, but not one that's overly relevant to your situation - try this one: http://www.middleatlantic.com/~/media/MiddleAtlantic/Documents/WhitePapers/ThermalManagement.ashx

Dave
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