Visiting Consumer Reports TV Testing Lab - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 1Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 41 Old 10-22-2013, 05:55 PM - Thread Starter
Senior Writer @ AVS
 
imagic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 6,537
Mentioned: 33 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1861 Post(s)
Liked: 3159

Consumers Union is the nonprofit organization that publishes Consumer Reports. The magazine is famous for the impartiality of its reviews, starting with the fact that the organization buys all the products it tests using secret shoppers. Naturally, the range of products the magazine tests includes televisions…many televisions.

 

I was unfamiliar with the current state of Consumer Reports' television-testing program, probably because it has been many years since I subscribed to the magazine. However, a chat with AVS member Jim Willcox (JakeNY28) revealed that he is actually the Senior Editor/Electronics at CR, and he graciously arranged for a visit to the testing lab.

 

I arrived at the 14-acre campus in Yonkers, NY, and met with Jim, who introduced me to Claudio Ciacci, the Electronics Testing Program Leader. We went straight to the lab and delved into details of the testing process, while I took in stark surroundings—Claudio designed the entire space to make testing televisions as efficient as possible. 

 

Consumer Reports National Testing and Research Center in Yonkers, NY

 

Over the course of one year, Consumer Reports tests and reviews over 200 different TV models. Every unit goes through exactly the same battery of tests, all designed to reveal the full capabilities of each television. Nothing is taken for granted—even something as basic as whether a TV is 720p or 1080p is subject to independent verification—because printed specifications are not always accurate.

 

The lab is currently set up to test thirty TVs at one time

 

Claudio is responsible for how Consumer Reports tests televisions today. It takes five weeks for a TV to pass through the lab, and the lab tests 30 TVs in that time period. Technicians subject each unit to a series of tests that measure its capabilities while simultaneously identifying the optimum settings for that display.

The testing and review process is dauntingly technical. I saw the workbook in which all the collected data resides—it is amazing that Consumer Reports can distill so much information into its traditional method of ranking from poor to excellent. When one considers the explosion of features that are the hallmark of modern TVs, it becomes clear what a Herculean task it is to stay on top of it all.

 

The first thing the lab does is measure basic performance parameters—contrast, sharpness, color, resolution, native refresh rate, power consumption, etc.—as well as compile a list of features. The technicians go over each unit with a fine-tooth comb and essentially create a new spec sheet from scratch. Every part of the testing process is proprietary to Consumer Reports, including the test patterns.

 

A Photo Research SpectraScan PR-740 spectroradiometer takes hyper-accurate measurements

 

If a TV has premium features such as 3D capability, those also are tested. One of the more impressive examples revealed the amount of 3D ghosting generated by a given TV. I was bit shocked by the sorry state of active-shutter 3D technology, especially when it comes to LCD panels. For example, I did not know that crosstalk was such a big issue—thanks to Claudio's tests, its ubiquitous presence on active-shutter panels was obvious.

 

Claudio Ciacci explaining the testing process

 

Once I was in the lab, I began to grasp how serious Consumer Reports is about its TV-testing program. As Jim and Claudio explained it, in years past, the testing process took too long to be relevant, considering the frantic pace of development in the flat-panel arena. With traditional print publishing, it could take up to six months for a new TV model's review to appear—and even then, the sheer number of makes, models, and screen sizes made researching a TV purchase a daunting process. Fortunately, websites bypass all of these limitations, allowing for timely publication of reviews while incorporating search and sort tools that make comparisons fast and easy. This is crucial, because the pace of change in the TV industry is literally breakneck—it truly is survival of the fittest.

 

This year is a perfect example, with the introduction of OLED and the surprising growth of the UHD/4K segment. Screen sizes are going way up, and prices are dropping. Streaming and other "smart" features are standard on most TVs, and even "dumb" TVs are compatible with third-party streaming solutions such as ChromeCast, Roku, and Apple TV. Choosing the right model is more complex than ever before—a consumer still has to juggle many factors when making an educated decision about which TV to buy.

 

I asked Claudio about his opinions regarding video processing, such as noise reduction, so-called "vivid mode," and frame interpolation. He is totally opposed to gratuitous video processing, which came as a great relief. Part of the CR testing process includes confirming that the video-processing features—which are normally on by default—can be disabled by the user. This is not always the case with all TVs, especially when it comes to budget brands. Turning a feature off does not always completely disable processing.

 

Some of the test patterns and scenes used by Consumer Reports lab

 

Over the past year, I have had the pleasure of seeing the latest TVs, such as the $10,000 55" OLEDs from LG and Samsung, reference-quality plasmas from Samsung and Panasonic, and some amazing full-array local-dimming UHD/4K LCD TVs such as Samsung's 84" S9. At the extreme high end, image quality is very close to perfect. However, the vast majority of TVs sold today are LED-edgelit LCD panels, which suffer significant image-quality issues—something I've seen demonstrated numerous times in controlled environments.

 

Even so, it's always a shock to see tests designed to show the flaws with LED-edgelit LCDs. Simply put, the same technology that allows TVs to be thin, light, and energy-efficient also results in inferior performance—largely characterized by uneven illumination—that can be extremely distracting.

 

Edge lit LCD TVs suffer from halo artifacts when rendering bright objects on dark backgrounds

 

One of the more punishing tests for edgelit LCD TVs is watching a simple white object traveling horizontally across a black background. Manufacturers often claim some form of "local dimming" for these units, but the simple fact is there's no way to isolate the light coming from the edges to illuminate a bright object in the center of the screen. An artifact known as flashlighting is clearly visible, as is an amorphous bright blob around the white object—a halo artifact. In the same room, a calibrated high-end plasma television served as a reference unit. The white object tracked perfectly on the plasma, with no halo or flashlight artifact. The combined difference in black levels and lack of artifacts demonstrated a stunning gap in performance between the two technologies. Plasma fans certainly know what they are talking about when it comes to image quality issues and edgelit LCD.

 

There are two basic types of LCD panels—VA (vertical alignment) and IPS (in-plane switching). Each has its advantages and disadvantages. When viewed head-on, VA panels tend to have deeper blacks than IPS, but when viewed from the side, IPS panels maintain picture quality while VA panels tend to lose saturation and contrast. I knew about these characteristics already, but Claudio showed me something I did not know about—when viewed from below, many IPS panels suffer the same loss of contrast and saturation that VA panels do when viewed from the side.

 

A little light bulb lit up above my head, and I asked Claudio, "Aren’t many TVs mounted above a fireplace mantle? This could be a real issue with IPS panels." He agreed, saying that buyers of IPS panels should make sure to get a wall mount that tilts in that case.

 

The point is that TVs present a complex subject to cover. There are many makes and models, and finding the right one for a specific application takes a fair bit of research. Most of this research is impossible to perform in a store. In fact—and this might be a bit controversial—I think that many people would actually be better off shopping for a television using nothing but online tools, as opposed to trying to pick out the right television while standing in a big-box discount store. I am not referring to high-end retailers, where there is a light-controlled environment and a knowledgeable salesperson—I'm talking about the giant wall of TVs where many shoppers choose their flat panels.

 

For example, when it comes to discount televisions, manufacturers sometimes use panels from different suppliers in different-sized televisions within the same line. As a result, performance is not consistent throughout all screen sizes, which is why it is necessary to test all the different screen sizes. Another factor is firmware version, because sometimes a firmware update can fundamentally change the settings that are optimal for a given television.

 

The point of the CR lab's process is to get the televisions to the best possible state in terms of picture quality, short of a professional calibration. As Claudio explained it, if a television really does require professional calibration to look great, that will actually count against it. The reason is simple—many modern televisions actually do perform very well out of the box. Of course, it also counts against a TV if standard tweaking does not result in a good picture.

 

By design, the tests are as objective as possible; any trained technician can take the place of any other trained technician and produce essentially the same results. The technicians log the optimum settings, along with the accompanying firmware version. At this point, the TV moves on to the final testing phase.

 

TVs lined up for testing

 

As I mentioned earlier, there is a reference-quality plasma television in the lab—a fully calibrated Panasonic TC-P55VT50. Actually, there are two of them. Each television has to go up against this reference, which is a tough TV to beat. Then, the techs watch a variety of content on the optimized TV in order to get a handle on how it performs an actual use, as opposed to how it measures. Ultimately, both factors are relevant to any thorough review.

 

Of course, there is a catch—what Consumer Reports does is undoubtedly an expensive endeavor. As I noted at the beginning, the nonprofit Consumers Union publishes the magazine, which eschews advertising and does not accept product samples from manufacturers. That leaves one source of funding—paying subscribers. The magazine itself requires a subscription, of course. However, when it comes to television reviews, consumerreports.org offers the most comprehensive resource for researching a potential purchase. Some access is free, but access to ratings, comparison tools, settings used to optimize televisions, and other premium features require a subscription.

 

I cannot help but be impressed by the program Claudio and Consumer Reports have put together. As Jim described it, prior to Claudio, the publication's television reviews were relatively subjective. Claudio injected more science and objectivity into the process and added economies of scale. The result is an unprecedented amount of TV testing—at the current pace, Consumer Reports will test 300 different units each year. I do not know of any other outlet that is testing that many televisions as thoroughly and scientifically. I want to thank Jim Willcox for making my visit possible, and Claudio Ciacci for taking the time to show me the lab. I also want to thank engineers Christopher Andrade and Matt Ferretti, who were present on the tour and do a lot of the heavy lifting in the lab.

 

Consumer Reports has a lot of experience with testing TVs

 

Finally, I would like to note that AVS Forum features a user reviews section, which can offer insights into how actual consumers perceive products. Proper research includes looking at a mix of professional reviews, user reviews, and actual TVs. The average American watches around four hours of TV per day—far more time than they spend driving a car. Clearly, it is wise to learn as much as possible about all the available options before walking into a store.

 

Follow AVS Forum on Twitter

Like AVS Forum on FaceBook

+1 AVS Forum on Google+


Mark Henninger
imagic is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 41 Old 10-22-2013, 06:23 PM
 
vinnie97's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Nunya
Posts: 11,657
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 213 Post(s)
Liked: 1011
Depressing read!
vinnie97 is offline  
post #3 of 41 Old 10-22-2013, 06:54 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Scott Wilkinson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Burbank, CA
Posts: 1,356
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 363 Post(s)
Liked: 1211
Quote:
Originally Posted by vinnie97 View Post

Depressing read!


Why is that? I found it fascinating, and it really increased my respect for Consumer Reports' TV reviews.

FzyLgic likes this.

Scott Wilkinson
AVS Editor
Scott Wilkinson is offline  
post #4 of 41 Old 10-22-2013, 07:49 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Reddig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Hays, KS
Posts: 1,680
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Liked: 179
Great report! I am thoroughly impressed at Cunsomer Electrinics. I had no idea they went to such lengths to test there televisions. I gotta give them a kudos!

JBL Pro Cinema
Reddig is offline  
post #5 of 41 Old 10-22-2013, 08:10 PM
Advanced Member
 
DeadEd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Walnut Creek, CA
Posts: 504
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
Liked: 89
GREAT article imagic! That's for taking the time to share all that with us.

Dyslexics are teople poo.
DeadEd is offline  
post #6 of 41 Old 10-22-2013, 09:41 PM
Member
 
kauaidoug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 131
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Been a supporter of Consumer Reports magazine and .org. Your article was illuminating. thank you. I live in an area where I completely have to rely on reviews etc. I do have a walmart but that is it.
kauaidoug is offline  
post #7 of 41 Old 10-22-2013, 09:48 PM
AVS Special Member
 
robnix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,832
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 183 Post(s)
Liked: 303
Thanks Mark, this was really eye opening and brings a new sense of respect for CR.

Looky here!
robnix is online now  
post #8 of 41 Old 10-22-2013, 11:42 PM
 
vinnie97's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Nunya
Posts: 11,657
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 213 Post(s)
Liked: 1011
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Wilkinson View Post


Why is that? I found it fascinating, and it really increased my respect for Consumer Reports' TV reviews.
Yes, that was interesting, but the depressing part was the overbearing prevalence of LED-edgelit LCDs.
vinnie97 is offline  
post #9 of 41 Old 10-23-2013, 05:06 AM
AVS Club Gold
 
Scott Greczkowski's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Newington, Connecticut
Posts: 1,402
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Liked: 19
I am waiting for Joe Kane to chime in here. smile.gif

I would love his take on things as I know he talked about this on the last Home Theater Cruise.

Scott
SatelliteGuys.US / MultiChannel News
Scott Greczkowski is offline  
post #10 of 41 Old 10-23-2013, 07:19 AM
Member
 
JakeNY28's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 39
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 46
Hi, Scott. The reference you make to the number of LED-backlit sets in our lab simply reflects the market we cover. Last numbers I saw showed plasma at about 6 percent of the market, so the number of plasma TVs we review is actually disproportional to the market condition. Both Claudio and I use plasma sets (plus front projection systems) in our homes, so it is certainly not an indication of our personal preferences, nor the personal recommendations we make when asked for help by friends and family. (Personally it's been both amusing and annoying watching LCD manufacturers tout "features" —such as 120Hz technology or local dimming—that are in essence attempts to address shortcomings in LCD technology.) But market statistics show that most people are buying LCD TVs, so we do review a lot of them and try to let people know about their relative merits and drawbacks.

Thanks to Mark for coming to visit, and his fair, comprehensive article on our TV testing program. Over the past five or so years, Claudio (testing) and I (editorial) have worked hard to improve the TV testing and reporting that goes on here at Consumer Reports. It's sometimes frustrating to realize that the perception of Consumer Reports ("those stodgy old folks over CR") lags the reality of the changes we've been able to implement here. Claudio came here from Philips, where he was heavily involved in the development of the ATSC high-definition standards. (Though I jokingly blame him for Ambilight.) Before joining CR—and until it merged recently with Home Theater—I was a contributing editor at Sound & Vision magazine, and have been a contributing editor at Video, Video Review, Audio, Stereo Review--well, I better stop here or it's going to sound like a magazine graveyard. So our backgrounds were a bit different from previous hires.

Two quick things I'd like to add: One, we've pushed to be able to publish a lot of the First Looks (head to head reviews of the first passive and active 3D TVs, first looks at Ultra HD and OLED sets, etc.) as blogs, which reside in front of the paywall so everyone can see them. I've tried to jump in here to let you know when we publish something unique, and frankly I've learned a thing or two every time I do. (Most recently I was trying to figure out why we were seeing motion blur on the Samsung OLED until someone pointed out that OLED was a sample-and-hold technology, something that hadn't occurred to me until then. Thanks!) But a lot of this newsier info is available for free, if you weren't aware.

Also, Mark noted that we're using two fully calibrated Panasonic VT50 sets as references. I'm happy to report that we'll soon be adding an OLED TV as another reference, though we're trying to see if we can get one with a flat, rather than curved, panel.

Thanks again to Mark for his visit, and to all the AVS members who contribute to the discussions/knowledge about TVs. You sure keep us on our toes!--Jim Willcox, Senior Editor, Consumer Reports
imagic, Bigham16, Chere and 2 others like this.
JakeNY28 is offline  
post #11 of 41 Old 10-23-2013, 11:29 AM
Advanced Member
 
En Sabur Nur's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 733
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Thanks to iMagic and Consumer Reports for this insight into all the work involved in evaluating televisions displays. Very informative and exciting read. Ya know, I've read a few posts on this sight, over the years, implying that CR doesn't have the knowledge or equipment to evaluate television displays and that they're ratings, at least to them, were useless. I consider their opinions for televisions displays with almost as much consideration as I do for David Katzmeier, Kevin Miller and Thomas J. Norton, for example.. It's amazing how often the ones who know and understand come to similiar, if not the same, conclusions in their reviews. I've been a subscriber to Consumer Reports for a few years now and this look at Consumer Reports just reinforces my confidence in subscribing year after year. ! Keep up the good work.
En Sabur Nur is offline  
post #12 of 41 Old 10-23-2013, 11:39 AM
 
SeLfMaDe111985's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: United States
Posts: 1,305
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 99
Great read!! Didn't know that's how they get it done. And I agree with Vinnie it is kind of depressing to know that the reference panel is a VT50 which already indicates plasma superiority over LED is the main reference panel for all TVs and yet more and more people but LED. Idk led is cool if you game a crap ton till ur fingers bleed but for those who love accuracy and great blacks..plasma is the king here
SeLfMaDe111985 is offline  
post #13 of 41 Old 10-23-2013, 11:53 AM
Member
 
JakeNY28's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 39
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 46
One last thing, If I can. Claudio and I spent the time with Mark so we got the mentions in the article, but we have two really great young engineers—Christopher Andrade and Matt Ferretti—who perform a lot of the actual TV testing. Props to both those guys for the huge amount of work they take on.

In regard to En Sabur Nur's comments, it's true that the top reviewers generally have similar, if differently nuanced, findings. In the past I've worked with both David Katzmaier and Kevin Miller (Kevin actually performed the professional calibration on the projector in my home theater), and I know Tom Norton professionally, though not as well. All are great guys that I respect and read regularly. Jim
JakeNY28 is offline  
post #14 of 41 Old 10-23-2013, 11:59 AM - Thread Starter
Senior Writer @ AVS
 
imagic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 6,537
Mentioned: 33 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1861 Post(s)
Liked: 3159
Quote:
Originally Posted by En Sabur Nur View Post

Thanks to iMagic and Consumer Reports for this insight into all the work involved in evaluating televisions displays. Very informative and exciting read. Ya know, I've read a few posts on this sight, over the years, implying that CR doesn't have the knowledge or equipment to evaluate television displays and that they're ratings, at least to them, were useless. I consider their opinions for televisions displays with almost as much consideration as I do for David Katzmeier, Kevin Miller and Thomas J. Norton, for example.. It's amazing how often the ones who know and understand come to similiar, if not the same, conclusions in their reviews. I've been a subscriber to Consumer Reports for a few years now and this look at Consumer Reports just reinforces my confidence in subscribing year after year. ! Keep up the good work.

The exact opposite is true. The resources available in the lab are world-class and of course what Consumer Reports covers extends well beyond the TV lab. There is a full-sized anechoic chamber on site. There is another lab where streaming devices are tested, and another for listening to speakers in a living room type environment. It's all very scientific, the facilities are all modern and well-equipped. A couple more pictures...

 

A full-sized anechoic chamber is just one of the resources available at Consumer Reports labs

 

 

There are plenty of accessories for TVs that also get tested, like soundbars

Bigham16 likes this.

Mark Henninger
imagic is online now  
post #15 of 41 Old 10-23-2013, 02:20 PM
Advanced Member
 
Bigham16's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Lewisville, TX
Posts: 596
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 88 Post(s)
Liked: 50
Great read and thank you all for taking the time to share.



______________________
9.2.4 Home Theater Thread
Bigham16 is offline  
post #16 of 41 Old 10-23-2013, 05:01 PM
Member
 
pqwk50's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 74
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeadEd View Post

GREAT article imagic! That's for taking the time to share all that with us.


Yes, I agree. Fantastic article. Love Consumer Reports!

pqwk50 is offline  
post #17 of 41 Old 10-23-2013, 05:39 PM
AVS Special Member
 
tubetwister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Sacramento delta N. Cal. US Don't trust any air I can't see ☺
Posts: 3,324
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 684 Post(s)
Liked: 397
Excellent I like CR and c net TV reviews bought 2 new sets this year and both organisations pointed me in the right direction and helped make what so far have proven to be good choices for me. I have been a CR supporter for many years so when folks knock them I dismiss that as
an uninformed opinion .

Hires Music formats ..............."Why does it sound like a CD ?" ............. can we make it louder "?
"The wireless music box has no commercial value. Who would pay for a message sent to nobody in particular?"
- David Sarnoff's associates at RCA the 1920's -
tubetwister is online now  
post #18 of 41 Old 10-23-2013, 06:01 PM
AVS Special Member
 
MCaugusto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: BOSTON --- MA ---
Posts: 1,256
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 52 Post(s)
Liked: 48
Thanks Mark for this eye-opening visit to the Consumer Report testing facility. Like so many people here, i was very surprised in seeing their testing methodology, the state-of-the-art testing equipment and the workbook with all data collected from hundreds of different TVs. I had NO idea !
It has been awhile since i searched Consumer Reports for information on HDTV test results because it always showed such minimal amount of testing data - no full-on/full-off contrast ratio, no grey-scale tracking, no color chart tracking, no video processing results, etc - that i found them nearly useless, with the exception of repair / longevity data supplied by CR subscribers that can be rather revealing.
Which begs the question : If Consumer Reports has such full-feature HDTV testing facility then why not post the complete test data instead of just minimal ratings from "poor to excellent" for contrast, brightness, sharpness, color and tint ? What a waste of material...
I understand it would take too much magazine space to print graphs and charts results for every HDTV, but i am sure they could find a way to include such data (without charts) by simply inputting the results in numbers in that comparative grid display that the magazine uses when comparing products.
Has Consumer Reports changed the way it displays test results for HDTVs to include such data ? If so i would gladly renew my long expired subscription otherwise why bother, simply to read useless test reports such as "great contrast" or "poor color" ?
Marcos
MCaugusto is online now  
post #19 of 41 Old 10-24-2013, 09:36 AM
Member
 
JakeNY28's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 39
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 46
Would it be of interest if I were to show everyone an example of what we publish behind the paywall? I'll have to get permission, but I think it would be worthwhile for us to show how much more detailed test results are now available to subscribers than a few years ago. Let me know and I'll try and get the go-ahead to show what we publish for a single TV review.--Jim
JakeNY28 is offline  
post #20 of 41 Old 10-24-2013, 11:17 AM
Advanced Member
 
Ozzie Isaac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 531
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeNY28 View Post

Would it be of interest if I were to show everyone an example of what we publish behind the paywall? I'll have to get permission, but I think it would be worthwhile for us to show how much more detailed test results are now available to subscribers than a few years ago. Let me know and I'll try and get the go-ahead to show what we publish for a single TV review.--Jim

I would find that very useful. I have paged through the magazine from time to time and looked at the free information available, but always assumed the information behind the paywall matched the magazine and was mostly relegated to repair frequency and longevity.. Seeing a full review would be appreciated.

The repair/longevity comment is not a knock. It really good info. I use CR for lots of other items. Now I will definitely put more weight behind their TV recommendations.
Ozzie Isaac is offline  
post #21 of 41 Old 10-24-2013, 11:33 AM - Thread Starter
Senior Writer @ AVS
 
imagic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 6,537
Mentioned: 33 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1861 Post(s)
Liked: 3159
Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeNY28 View Post

Would it be of interest if I were to show everyone an example of what we publish behind the paywall? I'll have to get permission, but I think it would be worthwhile for us to show how much more detailed test results are now available to subscribers than a few years ago. Let me know and I'll try and get the go-ahead to show what we publish for a single TV review.--Jim
I think that is a great idea, if you do get the permission I will update the article with the example review.

Mark Henninger
imagic is online now  
post #22 of 41 Old 10-24-2013, 01:21 PM
Member
 
JakeNY28's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 39
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 46
Got the go-ahead, I emailed Mark to see the best way to handle it. Stay tuned. --jim willcox
JakeNY28 is offline  
post #23 of 41 Old 10-25-2013, 08:32 AM
BP
Senior Member
 
BP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Suburban NYC
Posts: 430
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Hi JakeNY28;
I live just a couple minutes from the CR offices and am truly surprised by the changes happening behind those walls! Very impressive lab.
I am looking forward to reading the "behind the wall" report!
BP

BP

Open mind, open ears. There are no absolutes!
BP is offline  
post #24 of 41 Old 10-28-2013, 08:34 AM
Member
 
JakeNY28's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 39
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked: 46
BP—Since you live so close, CR holds an open house every year in October—if you haven't you should come and depending on the year, you can visit our labs and facilities. --Jim
JakeNY28 is offline  
post #25 of 41 Old 10-28-2013, 01:49 PM
Advanced Member
 
Ozzie Isaac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 531
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 97
For those subscribed to this thread, a sample review has been posted .....

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1496510/sony-xbr-55x900a-consumer-reports-shares-a-review-with-avs

Thank you JakeNY28 for helping this to happen.
Ozzie Isaac is offline  
post #26 of 41 Old 10-28-2013, 07:06 PM
Member
 
stereo55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Menifee , Calif
Posts: 57
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Niiiiice read . Thanks !!! biggrin.gif

I miss my old Altec 1590 monoblocks ....
stereo55 is offline  
post #27 of 41 Old 10-29-2013, 08:16 AM
AVS Special Member
 
HuskerHarley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Lincoln,Neb
Posts: 1,465
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Thanks Mark & Jim, excellent read.

HH
HuskerHarley is offline  
post #28 of 41 Old 10-29-2013, 10:38 AM
Member
 
labman1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 77
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Liked: 18
Great read! When I visit my folks for holidays I always flip through their copies of CR it looks like I need my own subscription!smile.gif
labman1 is offline  
post #29 of 41 Old 10-30-2013, 12:02 AM
Member
 
conanb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Houston area
Posts: 101
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Maybe CR has updated their testing methodologies, but according his presentations on the last Home Theater Cruise, Joe Kane was very crtical of Consumer's Reports inadequate and inaccurate TV reviews.

SA: http://www.avsforum.com/t/744728/consumer-reports-rates-14-front-projectors/30
conanb is offline  
post #30 of 41 Old 10-30-2013, 06:46 AM
AVS Special Member
 
HuskerHarley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Lincoln,Neb
Posts: 1,465
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by conanb View Post

Maybe CR has updated their testing methodologies, but according his presentations on the last Home Theater Cruise, Joe Kane was very crtical of Consumer's Reports inadequate and inaccurate TV reviews.

SA: http://www.avsforum.com/t/744728/consumer-reports-rates-14-front-projectors/30

That thread is dated 2006, What am I missing?
HuskerHarley is offline  
Reply Latest Industry News

Tags
Displays

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off